Forschungsinstitut der Diabetes Akademie Bad Mergentheim FIDAM

Bad Mergentheim, Germany

Forschungsinstitut der Diabetes Akademie Bad Mergentheim FIDAM

Bad Mergentheim, Germany
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Hummel M.,TU Munich | Simon J.,Gemeinschaftspraxis im Altstadt Carre | Jacob S.,Praxis fur Pravention und Therapie | Braun P.,KfH Gesundheitszentrum | And 6 more authors.
Diabetes, Stoffwechsel und Herz | Year: 2016

Early diagnosis, qualified management and training, and individualised therapy may play a major role in improving quality of life in patients with diabetes type 2, while also reducing costs. Compliance with recommended treatment standards and cooperation between physicians in primary care and diabetes specialists are crucial in treatment effectiveness. An online panel surveyed 203 general practitioners, while tablet-based inquiries on attitudes and expectations on diabetes care in patients with type 2 diabetes were used in a survey on 143 diabetes specialists. The survey results confirm general practitioners as the primary contact point for patients. Both groups of healthcare professionals advocate constructive cooperation for the benefit of the patients, but there were differences in the importance attached to early and regular diabetes management. In conclusion, this analysis provides data previously lacking in Germany and reveals interesting details on management and referral practices in patients with type 2 diabetes alongside potential for optimisation. More intensive cooperation between primary care and diabetes specialists could stimulate a constructive discussion on "suitable" referral times for diabetes patients, and the differences between the healthcare professional groups involved reveal specific starting points for further scientific investigation.


Kulzer B.,Forschungsinstitut der Diabetes Akademie Bad Mergentheim FIDAM | Luthgens B.,Novo Nordisk AS | Landgraf R.,Deutsche Diabetes Stiftung | Hermanns N.,Forschungsinstitut der Diabetes Akademie Bad Mergentheim FIDAM
Diabetologe | Year: 2015

Background: The DAWN2™ study aims to improve the understanding of problems and unmet needs of people with diabetes and their family members, as well as healthcare professionals, patient organizations, and key stakeholders in diabetes. This article reports the results for the German study population and compares them to the global results. Methods: A total of 8596 people with diabetes participated in the global DAWN2™ study which was conducted in 17 countries representing 4 continents. Per country about 500 people with diabetes participated in the trial. The German study population comprised 502 people with diabetes (80 people with type 1 diabetes, 422 people with type 2 diabetes). Validated questionnaires for standardized measurement of quality of life, diabetes-related distress, diabetes self-care activities, empowerment, and healthcare provision were used. Additional items, e.g. social discrimination, were included. Results: Compared to the general population in Germany, people with diabetes reported a reduced quality of life and emotional well-being. Dispite this negative impact of diabetes on the quality of life, psychosocial aspects are rarely integrated in routine diabetes care. Nevertheless, compared to global results, the German results show a high satisfaction with diabetes care in general and a high rate of diabetes education. The extent of social discrimination is notably high, but lower than in the global comparison. Conclusion: The DAWN2™ study reveals that diabetes is associated with significant psychosocial burden. There is a need for improvement in psychosocial care for people with diabetes. Clinical trial registration: Universal Trial Number (UTN): U1111-1123-7509; Clinical Trials gov Identifier (NCT): NCT01507116. © 2015, ©The Author(s) (2015) This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com.


Kulzer B.,Forschungsinstitut der Diabetes Akademie Bad Mergentheim FIDAM | Krichbaum M.,Forschungsinstitut der Diabetes Akademie Bad Mergentheim FIDAM | Hermanns N.,Forschungsinstitut der Diabetes Akademie Bad Mergentheim FIDAM
Diabetologe | Year: 2013

Hypoglycemia is a serious psychological burden for the majority of persons with diabetes. This report summarizes the various aspects of mental distress caused by hypoglycemia, psychosocial risk factors for severe hypoglycemia and strategies for patients who have problems with hypoglycemia. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Schmitt A.,Forschungsinstitut der Diabetes Akademie Bad Mergentheim FIDAM | Gahr A.,Forschungsinstitut der Diabetes Akademie Bad Mergentheim FIDAM | Herrmanns N.,Forschungsinstitut der Diabetes Akademie Bad Mergentheim FIDAM | Haak T.,Forschungsinstitut der Diabetes Akademie Bad Mergentheim FIDAM | And 2 more authors.
Medizinische Welt | Year: 2012

Depressive symptoms are common in diabetes. Already sub-threshold depression has a strong negative impact on diabetes self-care and the patient's long-term prognosis. With the aims of an effective as well as efficient care of diabetes patients with subthreshold depression the cognitive-behavioural group therapy programme "DIAMOS - Strengthening diabetes motivation" was developed. The programme is suitable for patients with type 1 as well as type 2 diabetes and designated for four to six attendants. Its primary focus lies in diabetes-specific problems and distress. In the course of ten sessions strategies to cope with these problems are developed und motivating goals are set. The article presents the concept, structure and contents of the programme. © Schattauer 2012.


Hermanns N.,Forschungsinstitut der Diabetes Akademie Bad Mergentheim FIDAM | Kulzer B.,Forschungsinstitut der Diabetes Akademie Bad Mergentheim FIDAM | Kohlmann T.,Institute for Community Medicine | Landgraf W.,Sanofi S.A. | And 2 more authors.
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes | Year: 2015

Background: Pharmacological and clinical differences between insulin glargine and NPH insulin may translate into differences in patient reported outcomes, but existing data are equivocal. Methods: In this 48-week, open-label, randomized, multi-center, crossover phase IV trial, insulin naïve type 2 diabetes patients with blood glucose not at target on oral hypoglycemic agents had basal insulin added to their treatment regimen. A total of 343 patients were randomized to either receive insulin glargine (n = 176; sequence A) or neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin (n = 167; sequence B) in period 1 (weeks 1-24) and vice versa in period 2 (weeks 25-48). The primary objective was to assess patient reported outcomes using a composite Diabetes Related Quality of Life (DRQoL) score based on an unweighted Insulin Treatment Experience Questionnaire (ITEQ) score, a Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) questionnaire score, and the mental health score in the Short Form (SF)-12® Health Survey, analyzed by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Results: Patients (mean age 62.3 ± 9.0; 39.5 % female) had a mean diabetes duration of 9.6 ± 5.9 years, a mean baseline HbA1c of 8.15 ± 0.72 %, and a mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) level of 9.37 ± 2.19 mmol/L. A total of 229 patients were available for primary endpoint evaluation (modified intention to treat population). Combining all data from both periods for each insulin treatment, on a 0-100 scale, the mean DRQoL score was 69.6 (±9.04) with insulin glargine and 70.0 (±9.40) with NPH insulin. Neither an effect of treatment with insulin glargine vs NPH insulin (p = 0.31) nor a period effect (p = 0.96), nor a sequence effect (p = 0.76) was observed using ANCOVA. Conclusions: The results show that in a patient population with sub-optimal glycemic control at baseline, and a low target achievement rate together with a low rate of hypoglycemia, differences in the patient reported outcomes evaluated in this study were negligible between insulin glargine and NPH insulin. © 2015 Hermanns et al.


PubMed | Forschungsinstitut der Diabetes Akademie Bad Mergentheim FIDAM, Institute for Community Medicine and Sanofi S.A.
Type: | Journal: Health and quality of life outcomes | Year: 2015

Pharmacological and clinical differences between insulin glargine and NPH insulin may translate into differences in patient reported outcomes, but existing data are equivocal.In this 48-week, open-label, randomized, multi-center, crossover phase IV trial, insulin nave type 2 diabetes patients with blood glucose not at target on oral hypoglycemic agents had basal insulin added to their treatment regimen. A total of 343 patients were randomized to either receive insulin glargine (n=176; sequence A) or neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin (n=167; sequence B) in period 1 (weeks 1-24) and vice versa in period 2 (weeks 25-48). The primary objective was to assess patient reported outcomes using a composite Diabetes Related Quality of Life (DRQoL) score based on an unweighted Insulin Treatment Experience Questionnaire (ITEQ) score, a Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) questionnaire score, and the mental health score in the Short Form (SF)-12 Health Survey, analyzed by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA).Patients (mean age 62.39.0; 39.5 % female) had a mean diabetes duration of 9.65.9 years, a mean baseline HbA1c of 8.150.72 %, and a mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) level of 9.372.19 mmol/L. A total of 229 patients were available for primary endpoint evaluation (modified intention to treat population). Combining all data from both periods for each insulin treatment, on a 0-100 scale, the mean DRQoL score was 69.6 (9.04) with insulin glargine and 70.0 (9.40) with NPH insulin. Neither an effect of treatment with insulin glargine vs NPH insulin (p=0.31) nor a period effect (p=0.96), nor a sequence effect (p=0.76) was observed using ANCOVA.The results show that in a patient population with sub-optimal glycemic control at baseline, and a low target achievement rate together with a low rate of hypoglycemia, differences in the patient reported outcomes evaluated in this study were negligible between insulin glargine and NPH insulin.Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00941369.

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