Forschungsanstalt Geisenheim

Geisenheim, Germany

Forschungsanstalt Geisenheim

Geisenheim, Germany
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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE.2010.1.2-04 | Award Amount: 4.07M | Year: 2011

The main objective of the EUBerry project is to provide the necessary knowledge and tools to facilitate development of high quality, consumer-desirable fresh berry fruits of high nutritional quality optimal for human health at a competitive cost. The further objective is the development and validation of a set of tools to improve competitiveness of European berry production and consumer accessibility to berry fruits. The EUBerry platform will be developed and validated by using strawberry and raspberry and blueberry as model crop species. Additionally, specific critical points related to improvement of berry fruit quality and reduction of production costs will be considered also for currants and blackberries. This project will apply the most recent technical advances in: a) Identifying germplasm of the main berry fruit genera appropriate for sustainable production throughout the EU, with respect to fruit quality and environmental adaptation and expanding use of modern breeding strategies to accelerate the release of new berry fruit cultivars into the future; b) Ensuring and expanding high-quality production systems to improve availability of high-quality fresh berries for consumers by focusing on the modern cultivation techniques for berry season extension, on adaptation to different cultivation conditions and systems, as well as to climate change, and on reducing the impact on environment in different European regions; c) Developing and applying validated methods to control and maintain fruit nutritional quality, improving shelf-life of fresh berries and increasing their availability to consumers; d) Developing economic studies to verify the impacts of the new technologies in increasing berry economic viability, farmer and consumer attractiveness; e) Disseminate and communicate the results to research scientists, academia, technical services, growers, market organizations, consumers, food industries, health authorities and regulatory and legislative authorities.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-1 | Award Amount: 1.30M | Year: 2009

Botrytis cinerea is a fungus that affects wine grapes and is responsible for the grey rot infection, which can strongly alter the quality of grapes and derived wine, causing: browning, destruction of flavour compounds, decrease of foaming properties, fermentation stopping. Grey rot is the largest infection of grapes in vineyards all over the world and is a major problem both for wine growers and wine producers, being very rapid and resistant to fungicides. The derived economic impact is disastrous, accounting for the loss of 15-40% of harvests, overcoming 15 billions of Euro per year (25% of the potential world wine production turnover). Quality control is usually done visually or through lab based analysis which need several minutes and are highly complex and expensive. The SAFEGRAPE aims to develop a simple and cheap instrument for the wine industry, able to provide a quantitative and reliable evaluation of the presence of grey rot infection in grapes in a very short time. The instrument is based on a biosensor system and on an innovative analysis method, that allows a precise and very fast analysis procedure, i.e. in less than one minute, which is compatible with the quality control procedures applied to grapes before wine-making (measure of total acidity, sugar content). The main result expected from the project is the development of the biosensor system integrated in 2 instruments: 1. portable instrument for the measure in vineyard, to be used by winegrowers in the field or after grape-harvest; 2. on-line instrument for quality control in wine production sites, to be integrated in the quality controls commonly applied (sugar and total acidity content). These instrumentations will allow to increase the wine quality and reduce the loss of harvest of about 10%, by a fast intervention in the field and is expected to have a market potential of several tens of millions of Euro for the SME proposers.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.1.2-04 | Award Amount: 8.49M | Year: 2013

The strategic goal of the project is to help the European vineyard sector facing the increasingly global competition by meeting: * Consumer demands for diversified high quality wines and concerns for food safety * Citizens requests for environment-friendly production systems involving decreased or no use of pesticides and spare of not renewable natural resources * Producers needs of plant material, tools and methods to help them cope with the negative impacts of climate change while responding to demands for quality, environmental friendliness and needs of profitability To reach this overall goal, the project will: * At the plant level, improve and design agricultural practices (canopy management, irrigation, fertilisation, training systems, pest and disease control, etc.) aimed at maximising berry quality, durable resistance to pests and and diseases, and adaptation to climate change (higher CO2, drought, UV light, and higher temperatures) * At the vineyard level, design, develop and test innovative agronomic systems integrating new agricultural practices and taking into account the variability of constraints met by European vineyards grown under a wide range of environments * At the breeding level, diversify grapevine varieties with regard to desirable adaptative traits building on tools and knowledge developed through international breeding and genomic initiatives. The project will combine short, medium, and long-term approaches to respectively conceive innovative viticulture systems, design and test novel agronomic practices and decision support systems, and exploit the genetic diversity of grapevine that all together will ensure a progress towards sustainable viticulture.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-1 | Award Amount: 1.49M | Year: 2010

The wine industry, which is made up of thousands of SMEs and family business, is an important contributor to the EU economy, providing countless jobs in vine cultivation and harvesting, wine production, bottling and distribution. However, the sector faces severe problems. Consumption is down, and exports from the New World are making huge inroads into the market. Over the last decade, imports have grown by 10% per annum, while exports are only increasing slowly. On current trends, excess wine production will reach 15% of annual production by 2010/11. The modern wine industry needs tools for process control and quality assessment in order to better manage the fermentation process, which is critical in determining the ultimate quality of red wine. During fermentation it is important to measure both substrate and product concentrations (sugars, phenolic compounds, etc.). However, analysis of these compounds by traditional means requires sample preparation, and in some cases several purification steps, proving time consuming, laborious and prone to human error, while offering no real-time data. To this end, this project aims to develop an affordable, reliable on-line tool for the rapid monitoring of red wine fermentation. Novel inspection techniques will be researched to determine their potential for predicting critical wine fermentation parameters. A prototype VITISPEC on-line monitoring system will be designed, developed and tested in a modern wine making facility and calibrated against existing methods. The results of this project will add real value to EU wine producers by raising the quality standards and consistency of their wine, strengthening Europes position as a leading wine producing region of the world and safeguarding the growth of many rural economies across EU-27.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-1 | Award Amount: 1.52M | Year: 2010

Wine producers are constantly striving to achieve a stable product with an extended period of peak taste and bouquet. Naturally aged wine tends to be milder tasting, smoother to drink and have a higher metabolism than non-aged wine. Research has shown this to be due to the dynamic structures of the ethanol-water clusters being changed to a smaller, more uniform state as the wine ages. Prior to the ageing process, many wines are treated with certain additives, such as potassium bisulphate, sodium bisulphate, and other conditioners and ingredients. However it is left to the traditional ageing process to disperse these ingredients throughout the liquid, as well as to the judgement of expert winemakers to periodically taste the wine to determine whether more additives are required. The various modules in wine will then blend with or attach to each other imperfectly over time. When attachment is complete a degree of stability sets in for a period of time. At this point the wine is at its optimal state for consumption. Following this period the process of detachment begins, resulting in a loss of wine quality. Research to date has revealed that the aging process can be enhanced with by the application of high pressures and temperatures over time, however extremes in either can be detrimental to the quality of the wine and controlled delivery is of utmost importance. This project will build on past research that has demonstrated promising results for the application of temperature and pressure by ultrasonic radiation which can alter the interaction of wine ingredients to obtain chemical changes in the wine resembling many years of natural ageing. A prototype ultrasound device will be designed, built and integrated into existing wine fermentation vats in order to validate its usefulness at industrial scale for the production of homogenous wines with an extended shelf-life in very short periods of time compared to natural ageing.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.2.2 | Award Amount: 2.72M | Year: 2013

The aim of this project is the design, development, and deployment of a novel use-case agricultural robot under the scope of Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV), and equipped with several non-invasive sensing technologies to monitor: 1) of grape yield, 2) vegetative growth, 3) Water stress and 4) Grape composition in order to optimize the vineyard management and improve grape composition and wine quality.\n\nThe use of UGVs to monitor vineyard physiological parameters and grape composition has several advantages over simple hand-held devices for manual sampling and over UAV.\n\nUGVs may provide key information regarding vineyard physiology and water stress, grape composition, and pests and diseases incidence much faster than manual solutions and at higher resolution, in a more flexible way, and lower cost than aerial scouting carried out by drones or planes.\n\nThe scope covers the integral monitoring of vineyards, over the entire season, by placing a ground robot along the vineyards (endowed with artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques).\nThe final users will receive updated in mobile application (app).\n\nThe proposed use-case agricultural robots (where key proximal sensing technologies will be implemented) will allow revolutionary and conclusive decision making to optimize vineyard management and to drive agronomical fundamental decisions according to grape yield estimation, plant growth monitoring, water status, and berry composition assessment. UGV proposed will incorporate an integrated system that includes machine vision, thermography and fluorescence-based sensors. Canopy images and data acquisition processes will be executed in real time through customized algorithms to compose specific production maps.


Comuzzo P.,University of Udine | Rauhut D.,Forschungsanstalt Geisenheim | Werner M.,Forschungsanstalt Geisenheim | Lagazio C.,University of Genoa | Zironi R.,University of Udine
Food Control | Year: 2013

A survey was carried out on a thousand wines from organic viticulture from different European countries. Analytical data were collected about the most used quality control parameters (e.g. alcoholic strength, reducing sugars, total acidity and pH, volatile acidity, malic and lactic acid, free and total sulfur dioxide), as well as regarding some compounds harmful for human health, such as ochratoxin A and biogenic amines. The results collected on quality control parameters were generally in agreement with the values normally detectable for conventional wines. Total sulfur dioxide was lower than 110-120mg/L in the most of the samples and no significant correlation was found between sulfite levels and other parameters. Ochratoxin A (OTA) seemed not a generalized problem for organic wine productions: its concentration was below the European legal limit, in the 95% of the samples analyzed; nevertheless, the risk of OTA pollution seemed higher in certain southern European regions. On the other hand, biogenic amines (BA) appeared a serious problem for organic winemaking and high concentrations were found in many of the analyzed wines. They seemed connected with a bad management of malolactic fermentation, being generally associated with high pHs and volatile acidities. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Guardiola M.,CSIC - Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes | Frotscher J.,Forschungsanstalt Geisenheim | Uriz M.J.,CSIC - Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes
Hydrobiologia | Year: 2012

The allochthonous calcarean sponge Paraleucilla magna has proliferated in the western Mediterranean during the last decade, where it currently shows a highly patchy distribution with dense populations in the neighboring of sea farms and slightly eutrophised marinas, and more sparse populations in well-preserved habitats. To gain knowledge about the species invasive capacity, we studied spatial genetic differentiation and structure, clonality, and temporal differentiation, in three close populations of P. magna at the NE of the Iberian Peninsula, in three successive years. The study hypothesis was that the species is able to proliferate under favorable conditions in newly colonized habitats but populations can easily disappear where perturbations occur with some frequency. Samples were genotyped for nine polymorphic microsatellites. Spatial genetic structure was found in the three populations of 2006. One population disappeared in 2007, and the other two remained slightly differentiated, while the three populations were in place again in 2008, and showed very low (but significant) F ST values, and non-significant D values. Low but statistically significant differentiation also occurred for the three populations between years. Results showed high-allele diversity, but heterozygote deficit and changes in allele frequencies in the populations over the 3 years, which are consistent with some genetic drift. The whole population descriptors pointed to the species as a good opportunistic colonizer as it has been hypothesized, but highly sensitive to stochastic events affecting recruitment. This suggests a high impact of the species in favorable habitats (sea culture and sheltered zones) and a low-medium influence in native communities. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


A substantial expansion of wine supply has induced a strong product proliferation on the market. It is not only the taste of wines that has become more diversified, but quality signals are increasingly utilized, too. Quality signals include information on the wine bottle, such as origin, grape variety or brands. Additionally, there is a strong trend towards using the product design, i.e. bottle type or style of the wine label, as an instrument of product differentiation. The objective of this article is to analyze whether the product design affects the perceived taste of wine and the willingness to buy a wine. Primary data, which have been collected from an experiment combined with a survey of wine consumers, reveal that product design strongly affects the willingness to buy a wine. This strong effect occurs when the wine is tasted prior to the purchase decision. Interestingly, the product design affects consumers' taste evaluation of the wine that is crucial for the consequential effects on the willingness to buy. An alternative modeling approach with a direct impact of product design on willingness to buy strongly underestimates the role of product design. A cluster analysis additionally reveals that product design and other quality signals do matter in some wine consumer segments but less in others.

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