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Tawn E.J.,University of Manchester | Tawn E.J.,Formerly of Westlakes Research Institute | Curwen G.B.,University of Manchester | Curwen G.B.,Formerly of Westlakes Research Institute | And 5 more authors.
Radiation Research | Year: 2015

Workers from the Sellafield nuclear facility (Cumbria, UK) with occupational exposures to external sources of ionizing radiation were examined for translocation frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This is an extension of an earlier study of retired workers, and includes analyses of additional samples from the earlier collection, bringing the total to 321. Another 164 samples from both current and retired employees, including 26 repeat samples, were obtained from a new collection, thus giving a combined dataset of 459 workers. This all-male population of workers was divided into 6 dose groups comprising 97 with recorded external occupational doses <50 mGy, 118 with 50-249 mGy, 129 with 250-499 mGy, 89 with 500-749 mGy, 17 with 750-999 mGy and 9 with >1,000 mGy. Univariate analysis showed a significant association between external dose and translocation frequency (P < 0.001) with the estimate of slope ± standard error being 1.174 ± 0.164 × 10-2 translocations per Gy. Multivariate analysis revealed that age increased the rate of translocations by 0.0229 ± 0.0052 × 10-2 per year (P < 0.001). However, the impact of age adjustment on the radiation dose response for translocation frequencies was minor with the new estimate of slope ± standard error being 1.163 ± 0.162 × 10-2 translocations per Gy. With the dose response for the induction of translocations by chronic in vivo low-LET radiation now well characterized, cytogenetic analysis can play an integral role in retrospective dose reconstruction of chronic exposure in epidemiological studies of exposed populations. © 2015 by Radiation Research Society. Source


Tawn E.J.,University of Manchester | Tawn E.J.,Formerly of Westlakes Research Institute | Curwen G.B.,University of Manchester | Curwen G.B.,Formerly of Westlakes Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Radiological Protection | Year: 2015

Germline minisatellite mutation rates were investigated in male workers occupationally exposed to radiation at the Sellafield nuclear facility. DNA samples from 160 families with 255 offspring were analysed for mutations at eight hypervariable minisatellite loci (B6.7, CEB1, CEB15, CEB25, CEB36, MS1, MS31, MS32) by Southern hybridisation. No significant difference was observed between the paternal mutation rate of 5.0% (37 mutations in 736 alleles) for control fathers with a mean preconceptional testicular dose of 9 mSv and that of 5.8% (66 in 1137 alleles) for exposed fathers with a mean preconceptional testicular dose of 194 mSv. Subgrouping the exposed fathers into two dose groups with means of 111 mSv and 274 mSv revealed paternal mutation rates of 6.0% (32 mutations in 536 alleles) and 5.7% (34 mutations in 601 alleles), respectively, neither of which was significantly different in comparisons with the rate for the control fathers. Maternal mutation rates of 1.6% (12 mutations in 742 alleles) for the partners of control fathers and 1.7% (19 mutations in 1133 alleles) for partners of exposed fathers were not significantly different. This study provides evidence that paternal preconceptional occupational radiation exposure does not increase the germline minisatellite mutation rate and therefore refutes suggestions that such exposure could result in a destabilisation of the germline that can be passed on to future generations. © 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd. Source

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