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Ciuvat A.L.,Transilvania University of Brasov | Ciuvat A.L.,Forest Research and Management Institute Bucharest | Abrudan I.V.,Transilvania University of Brasov | Blujdea V.,Forest Research and Management Institute Bucharest | And 3 more authors.
Notulae Botanicae Horti Agrobotanici Cluj-Napoca | Year: 2013

The aim of the paper was to develop biomass equations for young black locust trees from plantations and coppices established in South-West Romania. A destructive method was used to develop allometric biomass equations and to assess the carbon content of the individual tree and its biomass components. 418 black locust young trees (1-4 years old) from 27 plots established in plantations and coppices growing on sandy soils in Dolj and Olt counties were sampled. Simple linear regression models were developed for biomass estimation. The results shown that root collar diameter was the most accurate biomass predictor, whilst intercept and slope values were similar to those identified in other recent studies. The specific carbon content (mean values) was 45% for roots and 48% for leaves, similar to the values provided by Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change.


Merce O.,Forest Research and Management Institute Bucharest | Borlea G.F.,Banat University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Timisoara | Turcu D.O.,Forest Research and Management Institute Bucharest | Cantar I.C.,Forest Research and Management Institute Bucharest | Biris I.A.,Forest Research and Management Institute Bucharest
International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference Surveying Geology and Mining Ecology Management, SGEM | Year: 2015

Virgin forests are the most complex forest ecosystems both functionally and in terms of complexity and information provided. They show the following structural characteristics: they have a large amount of biomass, they present exemplars of trees with large dimensions, having very old ages, they have significant volumes of dead wood in various stages of decay, they have a heterogeneous structure with a mosaic distribution of the components. In the „Runcu Grosi” Nature Reserve they were studied the stages of decomposition and the deadwood volume using 41 sample plots of 1000 m2 each, located in the Reserve’s area. The measured amount of dead wood was 126.40 m3/ha. Using the statistical test “t – student”, we compared the volumes of (living) standing wood and the dead wood from the 41 sample plots, grouped, according to the predominant species by stading (living) wood volume, in three variants with 17, 16 and and 8 repetitions. Therefore, comparing the variants where the volume of standing wood is mainly sessile oak with the variants where the entire standing volume is beech, we obtained significant differences in the volume of dead wood. The same result was obtained when we compared the variants constituted by mainly beech and exclusively beech of living wood. When we compared the variants of predominant beech and predominant sessile aok living volumes, the differences were not significant in terms of volume of dead wood. © SGEM2015 All Rights Reserved.


Sofletea N.,Transilvania University of Brasov | Budeanu M.,Forest Research and Management Institute | Parnuta G.,Forest Research and Management Institute Bucharest
Silvae Genetica | Year: 2012

The performance of 33 Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] seed sources from the Romanian Carpathians was evaluated with respect to growth and wood characteristics in comparative trials located at two different site conditions: Avrig- outside of the natural range of Norway spruce and Breţcu - within the natural range of this species. The radial increment (RI), latewood percentage (LWP) and conventional wood density (CWD) traits were evaluated at age 30 years after plantation. Phenotypic correlations between the evaluated traits, on the one hand, and between the same traits and the geographic gradients of the origin of seed sources, on the other hand, were calculated. Analysis of variance showed significant (p<0.01) differences between seed sources for RI, while for LWP and CWD, the differences were highly significant (p<0.001). These results suggest that selection at seed sources level could be possible. The test sites influence the LWP and CWD, while the RI is almost similar in both sites. For RI, the most valuable populations are situated in the Eastern and Western Romanian Carpathians. The highest LWP was registered for the Eastern Carpathian populations, while the lowest was recorded for the Western Carpathian populations. The Southern Carpathian populations, characterized by a lower growth rate, had higher values for wood density.


Budeanu M.,Forest Research and Management Institute | Sofletea N.,Transilvania University of Brasov | Parnuta G.,Forest Research and Management Institute Bucharest
Annals of Forest Research | Year: 2012

Growth traits and survival rate were evaluated in two field trials consisting of 33 provenances (seed stands) spread across the entire natural distribution range of Norway spruce in Romania. Total tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH) and survival rate were measured at 30 years after planting. Both growth and adaptation traits show substantial genetic variation among the tested seed stands. The amplitude of variation depends markedly on trait and testing site. This fact suggests that the best performing seed stands for growth and adaptation traits at each testing site can be selected. Two groups of valuable populations from Romanian Carpathians - the Northern and Western part (Apuseni Mountains) - were identified. Survival rate was negatively correlated with growth traits, the average values in the two field trials were 68% and 70%. By analyzing growth and adaptation traits together with stem and wood qualitative traits, the best performing populations will be considered as tested seed sources and the forest reproductive material they can provide will be recommended for use in the regions of provenance where the two field trials are located.


Turcu D.-O.,Forest Research and Management Institute Bucharest | Merce O.,Forest Research and Management Institute Bucharest | Bouriaud O.,Forest Research and Management Institute Bucharest | Tomescu R.,Forest Research and Management Institute Bucharest | Ponette Q.,Catholic University of Louvain
International Multidisciplinary Scientific GeoConference Surveying Geology and Mining Ecology Management, SGEM | Year: 2015

The forests with high degree of naturality represent archetypes of structure and functioning of the forest ecosystems. The “Izvoarele Nerei” Nature Reserve, located in South-Western Romania, is one of the largest natural forest massifs from Europe – approx. 5000 ha – consisting of pure beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forests. A network of 12 sample plots of 1 ha each was set up on 4 altitudinal levels: 800, 1000, 1200 and 1350 m, respectively 3 plots/altitudinal level. Structural characteristics were measured and described within these plots. An average of 3 trees/ha of over 100 cm in DBH, 20 trees/ha of over 80 cm and 59 trees/ha of over 60 cm was found. For the standing dead trees, the average values were 0.5 trees/ha, 3 trees/ha and 6 trees/ha, respectively. Most of the large trees, over 100 cm in DBH, were concentrated in the area located at 800-1000 m altitude, where local densities of 7-11 trees/ha were found, while in the area close to the tree line showed 0-1 such large trees. Considering all trees over 60 cm in DBH, the situation is similar – there is a maximum (70-77 trees/ha) at 800-1000 m altitude and quite small densities of such trees at 1350 m altitude. It was observed that these outstanding trees, excelling by DBH or by total height, have often both these dimensions exceptional. It was concluded that large tree densities represent a key structural characteristic for the natural forests. © SGEM2015 All Rights Reserved.

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