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Suprapti S.,Forest Products Research and Development Center
Journal of Tropical Forest Science | Year: 2010

The decay resistance of five bamboo species, i.e. ampel bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris), betung bamboo (Dendrocalamus asper), andong bamboo (Gigantochloa pseudoarundinacea), tali bamboo (G. apus) and wulung bamboo (G. atroviolacea), collected from Bogor and Yogyakarta, was evaluated using the Kolle flask method (dried blocks on malt agar in flasks). The bamboo samples were divided longitudinally into three parts, namely, bottom, middle and top portions. Bambusa vulgaris, G. apus and G. atroviolacea were found to be moderately resistant to attack by 15 fungi, whereas G. pseudoarundinacea and D. asper were not resistant. Weight losses between bottom, middle and top portions of bamboo were not significantly different. However, the highest weight loss was encountered on the middle portion of G. pseudoarundinacea exposed to Pycnoporus sanguineus HHBI-324 (38.3%), while the lowest was found on the bottom portion of B. vulgaris exposed to Lentinus lepideus (2.3%). The most severe decay was caused by P. sanguineus HHBI-324, Tyromyces palustris and Polyporus sp. Source


Suprapti S.,Forest Products Research and Development Center
Journal of Tropical Forest Science | Year: 2010

Eighty-four species of wood from Aceh, Jambi, Riau, Sulawesi, Moluccas, Kalimantan and Java, which cover 36 families and 67 genera, were evaluated for their resistance against brown rot (Dacryopinax spathularia) and white rot (Pycnoporus sanguineus and Schizophyllum commune) attacks using Kolle-flask method (DIN 52176-modified standard). Results showed that the attack of white rot fungi were generally more severe than that of brown rot fungi. It was found that 30 wood species were categorised as resistant (class II), 20 species as moderately resistant (class III), 32 species as non-resistant (class IV) and 2 species as perishable (class V). Source


Djarwanto,Forest Products Research and Development Center | Tachibana S.,Ehime University
Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences | Year: 2010

This research was conducted in the aim of preventing wild fire through reducing potential energy source to become in situ fertilizer. To prevent forest fires by reducing wood waste using lignocellulose-degrading fungi, six fungal isolates were tested for lignin and cellulose-degrading activity with Acacia mangium leaves and twigs over a period of 1 to 3 months. The fungi degraded 8.9-27.1% of the lignin and 14-31% of the holocellulose. The degradation rate varied depending on the fungal species. An increase in incubation time tended to decrease the amounts of holocellulose and lignin. However, the hot water soluble tended to increase following a longer incubation period. From the results obtained here, more time was needed to degrade lignin rather than other components in the sample. © 2010 Asian Network for Scientific Information. Source


Hadi Y.S.,Bogor Agricultural University | Nurhayati T.,Forest Products Research and Development Center | Jasni,Forest Products Research and Development Center | Yamamoto H.,Nagoya University | Kamiya N.,Lumber Business Consultant
Journal of Tropical Forest Science | Year: 2010

Mindi wood (Melia azedarach) and sugi wood (Cryptomeriajaponica) were smoked for 12 hours using mangium wood (Acacia mangium) to study their resistance against termite. For comparison, wood preserved with 5% borax and untreated wood were prepared. All wood specimens were tested against (1) subterranean termite (Coptotermes curvignathus) in the in-ground test for one year, (2) subterranean termite in the laboratory, and (3) dry wood termite (Cryptotermes cynocephalus) in the laboratory. Sizes of wood specimen were 2 × 0.8 cm in cross-section, and in longitudinal directions were 20 cm for in-ground test, 2.5 cm for subterranean termite test and 5 cm for dry wood termite test. Ten replications were conducted for the in-ground test while for the rest of the tests, five replications. Results showed that mindi wood was more resistant to subterranean termite and dry wood termite attacks compared with sugi wood. Based on the Indonesian National Standard 2006, wood resistance against subterranean and dry wood termite attacks increased one class higher when samples were treated with smoke although it was still lower than wood preserved with borax 5%. Source

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