Forensic Science Laboratory Of Okayama Prefectural Police Hq

Kita-ku, Japan

Forensic Science Laboratory Of Okayama Prefectural Police Hq

Kita-ku, Japan
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Igoh A.,Forensic Science Laboratory Of Okayama Prefectural Police Hq | Akutsu T.,Chiba Institute of Science | Doi Y.,Forensic Science Laboratory Of Okayama Prefectural Police Hq | Doi Y.,Okayama University of Science
Analytical Methods | Year: 2016

Vaginal fluid identification is often required for forensic investigation of sexual assault cases. However, standardized assays for vaginal fluid identification have not been developed. Recently, we identified human fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) and human small proline-rich protein 3 (SPRR3) as characteristic vaginal fluid proteins by performing peptide mass fingerprinting. In this study, we developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for detecting FABP5 and SPRR3 and evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of these assays for detecting vaginal fluid. The data indicate that the levels of both protein markers were significantly higher in vaginal fluids and vaginal fluid stains than in other body fluids (nasal secretions, saliva, urine, semen, blood, and sweat). The dilution limits of FABP5 and SPRR3 ELISAs equated to 0.06 μL and 0.03 μL, respectively, of vaginal fluid extracts, thought to be sufficient for application to real forensic samples. Furthermore, the levels of both protein markers are not lowered during the menstrual cycle. The protein markers were also detectable in menopausal samples, taken from menopausal and pregnant volunteers. The protein markers were detected in some aged stains. FABP5 ELISA showed a better detection rate in inter laboratory tests using simulated casework samples compared to SPRR3 ELISA. Overall, FABP5 can be more useful for the identification of vaginal fluid for forensic investigation, although both FABP5 and SPRR3 assays can potentially be useful. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2016.


Igoh A.,Forensic Science Laboratory Of Okayama Prefectural Police Hq | Tomotake S.,Forensic Science Laboratory Of Okayama Prefectural Police Hq | Doi Y.,Forensic Science Laboratory Of Okayama Prefectural Police Hq | Doi Y.,Okayama University of Science
Legal Medicine | Year: 2015

Saliva is one of the most common body fluids found at a crime scene. Therefore, identifying saliva is important in forensic science. However, the current protein marker assays used to identify saliva are not sufficiently specific. Although proline-rich proteins (PRPs) are highly specific for saliva, their forensic potential has not yet been investigated. In this study, we developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) to detect acidic salivary PRP HaeIII subfamily 1/2 (PRH1/2) and basic salivary PRP 2 (PRB2). The specificity, sensitivity, and efficiency of the ELISAs for PRH1/2 and PRB2 were compared with those of the ELISA for statherin (STATH), a known protein marker for saliva. The levels of PRH1/2 were significantly higher in saliva and saliva stains than in other body fluids (nasal secretions, urine, semen, vaginal fluid, blood, and sweat). PRB2 and STATH were detected in both nasal secretions and saliva. The PRH1/2 ELISA showed sensitivity similar to that of STATH ELISA. The detection rate of PRH1/2 ELISA was almost similar to that of STATH ELISA, followed by the ELISA for PRB2. The PRH1/2 ELISA had higher specificity for saliva than STATH ELISA. Therefore, the PRH1/2 ELISA has potential as a method to identify saliva for forensic investigation. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.


Igoh A.,Forensic Science Laboratory Of Okayama Prefectural Police Hq | Doi Y.,Forensic Science Laboratory Of Okayama Prefectural Police Hq | Doi Y.,Okayama University of Science | Sakurada K.,Tokyo Medical and Dental University
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry | Year: 2015

Vaginal fluid is one of the most common body fluids found at crime scenes. Discriminating vaginal fluid from other body fluids is important in forensic science; however, few potential protein markers have been reported to date. Proteomic methods for identifying protein markers have gained attention, although few reports have applied this technology to forensic protein markers. Therefore, to identify characteristic vaginal proteins, we examined various body fluids (nasal secretions, saliva, urine, semen, vaginal fluids, and sweat) using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and peptide mass fingerprinting. We identified three components (average molecular mass values 17,237∈±∈2, 18,063∈±∈2, and 15,075∈±∈1) detectable only in vaginal samples: two human small proline-rich protein 3 (SPRR3) isoforms and a human fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) with an acetylated (+42) N-terminal region lacking the initiator methionine residue (-131). Using ELISA, these yielded markedly high average values in vaginal fluids. The mass spectra of these proteins were not detected in infant saliva but were detected in the vaginal fluid throughout the menstrual cycle. The results of forensic analysis (detection limit, mixed body fluid samples, casework samples, and blind samples) suggest that these proteins are potential forensic markers. In conclusion, high SPRR3 and FABP5 expression levels, which may be used as potential markers for vaginal fluid identification in forensic science, were detected in vaginal fluids from healthy adults. © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

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