Forensic Medicine

Chiavari, Italy

Forensic Medicine

Chiavari, Italy

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News Article | June 20, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Vienna, Austria - 20 June 2017: Pacemakers and other cardiac devices can help solve forensic cases, according to a study presented today at EHRA EUROPACE - CARDIOSTIM 2017.1 Devices revealed the time and cause of death in some cases where autopsy failed to do so. "In forensic medicine around 30% of cases remain unsolved because the cause or time of death after autopsy remains unclear," said lead author Dr Philipp Lacour, a cardiologist at Charité - Medical University of Berlin, Germany. "The number of implanted cardiac devices with sophisticated diagnostic functions is increasing and we thought interrogating them might help to shed light on these unclear deaths," he added. "Currently, device interrogation is not routinely performed after autopsy." The study was conducted in cooperation with the Department of Forensic Medicine at Charité - Medical University of Berlin where more than 5 000 autopsies were performed in a five year period. Of these, 150 cases had an implantable cardiac device which was removed from the body during the autopsy. The explanted devices included 107 pacemakers, 22 implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), 14 cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) systems, and six implantable loop recorders. The devices were interrogated by two electrophysiologists to determine time and cause of death, and device failure. Time of death could be determined in 76% of cases using data from the device. It could be identified precisely (to the minute) when the patient had tachycardia (fast heart rate) at the end of life. In other cases, changes in seven parameters were used to assign the time of death. These included lead impedance and pacing threshold. Dr Lacour said: "At the end of life, lead impedance rises because of changes in the heart muscle and pacing climbs to 100% because the device doesn't detect any heart rhythm." Cause of death was determined in 24% of cases. This included bradycardia, tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and device malfunctions. "The cause of death was most easily determined when the patient had a lethal arrhythmia such as tachycardia which was documented by the device," said Dr Lacour. "For example a ventricular fibrillation was recorded by a pacemaker, which did not intervene because it was not a defibrillator, and showed us that this arrhythmia caused the death." Device malfunction occurred in 7% of cases. This included hardware failure such as a broken lead, algorithm issues meaning the device did not recognise an arrhythmia or deliver a shock when it occurred, or a programming issue where the shock setting was insufficient to terminate an arrhythmia. Dr Lacour said: "In our study, the time or cause of death was unclear in about 30% of cases after autopsy alone. This dropped to around 10-20% using device interrogation. The two procedures provide complementary information and with the combination we can solve around 85% of all unclear deaths." "We think device interrogation should be routinely performed after autopsy in all forensic cases," continued Dr Lacour. "It helps determine the time and cause of death and identifies device malfunctions that might otherwise have gone unnoticed and should be highlighted to manufacturers and health departments." He concluded: "To ensure that accurate data is extracted from cardiac devices, the time between autopsy and device interrogation should be kept as short as possible and we try to do it within two weeks. This avoids the memory of the device filling up with artefacts that can be generated after the leads are cut."


News Article | June 20, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Pacemakers and other cardiac devices can help solve forensic cases, according to a study presented at EHRA EUROPACE -- CARDIOSTIM 2017.1 Devices revealed the time and cause of death in some cases where autopsy failed to do so. "In forensic medicine around 30% of cases remain unsolved because the cause or time of death after autopsy remains unclear," said lead author Dr Philipp Lacour, a cardiologist at Charité -- Medical University of Berlin, Germany. "The number of implanted cardiac devices with sophisticated diagnostic functions is increasing and we thought interrogating them might help to shed light on these unclear deaths," he added. "Currently, device interrogation is not routinely performed after autopsy." The study was conducted in cooperation with the Department of Forensic Medicine at Charité -- Medical University of Berlin where more than 5,000 autopsies were performed in a five year period. Of these, 150 cases had an implantable cardiac device which was removed from the body during the autopsy. The explanted devices included 107 pacemakers, 22 implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), 14 cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) systems, and six implantable loop recorders. The devices were interrogated by two electrophysiologists to determine time and cause of death, and device failure. Time of death could be determined in 76% of cases using data from the device. It could be identified precisely (to the minute) when the patient had tachycardia (fast heart rate) at the end of life. In other cases, changes in seven parameters were used to assign the time of death. These included lead impedance and pacing threshold. Dr Lacour said: "At the end of life, lead impedance rises because of changes in the heart muscle and pacing climbs to 100% because the device doesn't detect any heart rhythm." Cause of death was determined in 24% of cases. This included bradycardia, tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and device malfunctions. "The cause of death was most easily determined when the patient had a lethal arrhythmia such as tachycardia which was documented by the device," said Dr Lacour. "For example a ventricular fibrillation was recorded by a pacemaker, which did not intervene because it was not a defibrillator, and showed us that this arrhythmia caused the death." Device malfunction occurred in 7% of cases. This included hardware failure such as a broken lead, algorithm issues meaning the device did not recognise an arrhythmia or deliver a shock when it occurred, or a programming issue where the shock setting was insufficient to terminate an arrhythmia. Dr Lacour said: "In our study, the time or cause of death was unclear in about 30% of cases after autopsy alone. This dropped to around 10-20% using device interrogation. The two procedures provide complementary information and with the combination we can solve around 85% of all unclear deaths." "We think device interrogation should be routinely performed after autopsy in all forensic cases," continued Dr Lacour. "It helps determine the time and cause of death and identifies device malfunctions that might otherwise have gone unnoticed and should be highlighted to manufacturers and health departments." He concluded: "To ensure that accurate data is extracted from cardiac devices, the time between autopsy and device interrogation should be kept as short as possible and we try to do it within two weeks. This avoids the memory of the device filling up with artefacts that can be generated after the leads are cut."


News Article | June 20, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Pacemakers and other cardiac devices can help solve forensic cases, according to a study presented today at EHRA EUROPACE - CARDIOSTIM 2017.1 Devices revealed the time and cause of death in some cases where autopsy failed to do so. "In forensic medicine around 30% of cases remain unsolved because the cause or time of death after autopsy remains unclear," said lead author Dr Philipp Lacour, a cardiologist at Charité - Medical University of Berlin, Germany. "The number of implanted cardiac devices with sophisticated diagnostic functions is increasing and we thought interrogating them might help to shed light on these unclear deaths," he added. "Currently, device interrogation is not routinely performed after autopsy." The study was conducted in cooperation with the Department of Forensic Medicine at Charité - Medical University of Berlin where more than 5 000 autopsies were performed in a five year period. Of these, 150 cases had an implantable cardiac device which was removed from the body during the autopsy. The explanted devices included 107 pacemakers, 22 implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), 14 cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) systems, and six implantable loop recorders. The devices were interrogated by two electrophysiologists to determine time and cause of death, and device failure. Time of death could be determined in 76% of cases using data from the device. It could be identified precisely (to the minute) when the patient had tachycardia (fast heart rate) at the end of life. In other cases, changes in seven parameters were used to assign the time of death. These included lead impedance and pacing threshold. Dr Lacour said: "At the end of life, lead impedance rises because of changes in the heart muscle and pacing climbs to 100% because the device doesn't detect any heart rhythm." Cause of death was determined in 24% of cases. This included bradycardia, tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and device malfunctions. "The cause of death was most easily determined when the patient had a lethal arrhythmia such as tachycardia which was documented by the device," said Dr Lacour. "For example a ventricular fibrillation was recorded by a pacemaker, which did not intervene because it was not a defibrillator, and showed us that this arrhythmia caused the death." Device malfunction occurred in 7% of cases. This included hardware failure such as a broken lead, algorithm issues meaning the device did not recognise an arrhythmia or deliver a shock when it occurred, or a programming issue where the shock setting was insufficient to terminate an arrhythmia. Dr Lacour said: "In our study, the time or cause of death was unclear in about 30% of cases after autopsy alone. This dropped to around 10-20% using device interrogation. The two procedures provide complementary information and with the combination we can solve around 85% of all unclear deaths." "We think device interrogation should be routinely performed after autopsy in all forensic cases," continued Dr Lacour. "It helps determine the time and cause of death and identifies device malfunctions that might otherwise have gone unnoticed and should be highlighted to manufacturers and health departments." He concluded: "To ensure that accurate data is extracted from cardiac devices, the time between autopsy and device interrogation should be kept as short as possible and we try to do it within two weeks. This avoids the memory of the device filling up with artefacts that can be generated after the leads are cut."


Forensic scientists have traditionally used capillary electrophoresis (CE) to analyze STR markers for genetic profile comparisons with known individuals from the FBI's Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) database and other databases worldwide. However, complicating factors, such as DNA degradation, mixtures and/or insufficient starting material, prevent an estimated 30-40 percent of samples from offering conclusive results. The new Precision ID GlobalFiler NGS STR Panel v2 is designed to work seamlessly with the Ion Chef System for automated library and template preparation and sequencing on the Ion S5 and Ion S5 XL Systems, which offer as little as two hour sequencing run times and 15 minutes of hands-on time. The panel targets CODIS expanded core loci, with additional multi-allelic STR markers, including Penta D and Penta E, as well as sex determination markers. This expanded marker set assists in mixture resolution for identifying multiple contributors in complex casework samples. The new Converge NGS Analysis module is required to generate profiles from the Precision ID GlobalFiler NGS STR Panel v2. The HID STR genotyping functionality provides information on length-based STR allele call, sequence-based repeat motif, known SNPs in flanking regions, and isometric heterozygote (alleles of the same fragment length, but containing different repeat sequence) information. These additional sequence-based characteristics will deliver a wider allele range with an increased power of discrimination for individual identification. With an interface which is similar to Applied Biosystems GeneMapper ID-X software, forensic analysts can easily evaluate sequencing data using familiar Process Quality Values and flags, such as allele number (AN), off-ladder allele (OL), peak height ratio (PHR), below stochastic threshold (BST) and Control Concordance (CC). "NGS now has the ability to transform forensic genetics by enabling the recovery of highly discriminating allelic profiles from challenging mixed or degraded samples," said Claus Børsting, Ph.D., senior advisor at the Section of Forensic Genetics, Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. "Our tests show full concordance with CE based methods, high sensitivity, and new possibilities for mixture interpretation. Under our ISO 17025 laboratory accreditation, we have used NGS in relationship case work since 2015. Currently, we are validating an ancestry panel to bring NGS on-line in crime case work." "Our customers need more access to genetic identification profiles from complex DNA samples, prompting the continued development of the Precision ID NGS System, additional panels and a more comprehensive data analysis pipeline." said Rosy Lee, vice president and general manager of human identification at Thermo Fisher Scientific. Additional information on the Precision ID NGS System with Converge software can be found here. The Precision ID NGS System is for research, forensic or paternity use only; Not for use in diagnostic procedures. About Thermo Fisher Scientific Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. is the world leader in serving science, with revenues of $18 billion and more than 55,000 employees globally. Our mission is to enable our customers to make the world healthier, cleaner and safer. We help our customers accelerate life sciences research, solve complex analytical challenges, improve patient diagnostics and increase laboratory productivity. Through our premier brands – Thermo Scientific, Applied Biosystems, Invitrogen, Fisher Scientific, and Unity Lab Services – we offer an unmatched combination of innovative technologies, purchasing convenience and comprehensive support. For more information, please visit www.thermofisher.com.


News Article | August 4, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Swiss police say hundreds of bodies of mountaineers who have gone missing in the Alps in the past century could emerge in coming years as global warming forces the country’s glaciers to retreat. Alpine authorities have registered a significant increase in the number of human remains discovered last month, with the body of a man missing for 30 years the most recent to be uncovered. Rescue teams in Saas Valley in the Valais canton were called last Tuesday after two climbers retreating from an aborted ascent spotted a hand and two shoes protruding from the Hohlaub glacier. Rescuers spent two hours freeing the mummified body with icepicks and their bare hands, also recovering a silver wristwatch and a ring. A helicopter flew the remains to Bern, where forensics experts matched the DNA to that of a German citizen, born in 1943, who had gone missing on a hike in 11 August 1987. One rescue worker said the man had worn shoes “unsuitable” for walking on ice, suggesting he may have slipped after walking a few metres onto the glacier and fallen down a crevice. Both feet had become detached from the body, indicating the force of the fall. The discovery comes less than a week after the bodies of a Swiss couple, missing for 75 years, were found in the Tsanfleuron glacier in the same canton. Marcelin and Francine Dumoulin had disappeared after going out to milk their cows in a meadow above Chandolin on 15 August 1942. Last Thursday, the remains of a person believed to have been killed in an Air India crash more than 50 years ago was also discovered in the French Alps, on Mount Blanc. Switzerland’s glaciers have been melting at an unprecedented rate, losing almost one cubic km in ice volume or about 900 bn litres of water over the past year. According to an investigation by Tagesanzeiger newspaper, eight of the 10 months in which the glaciers have lost the most in volume over the past century have been since 2008. Since 1850, when glaciers covered 1,735 sq km (670 sq miles) of Swiss land, the total area has shrunk by a half, to about 890 sq km. Police in Valais expect the bodies of many more missing persons to emerge because of global warming. “It’s quite clear,” a spokesman, Christian Zuber, told the Guardian. “The glaciers are retreating, so it’s logical that we’re finding more and more bodies and body parts. In the coming years we expect that many more cases of missing persons will be resolved.” He said a map that lists everyone who had gone missing since 1925 to the present day contains 306 names and locations, one fewer since the discovery of the German mountaineer. At least 160 alpinists remain missing in France’s Mont Blanc massif, and the Morteratsch glacier in Graubünden is believed to contain the bodies of 40 mountaineers. Zuber described the “great relief” at being able to pass on the information to the families “who would otherwise never know with 100% certainty whether their loved one had perished on the mountain. Finally when a corpse is discovered, you have an absolute guarantee”, he said. He said that feeling had also been palpable earlier this year when a local woman was able to retrieve the bodies of her dead parents, the Dumoulins, who had disappeared when she was just four years old. “We locals are obviously used to the mountains, but such discoveries are no less emotional for the people here,” he said. Rolf Trachsel, head of mountain rescue in Saas-Fee, who led the operation to recover the German man’s body, said it had been discovered in an area popular with hikers. “There was very little snow, and it was not very steep. It was about half an hour’s hike away from the next mountain cable-car station.” He said although the team had to deal with the sad fact they were recovering a dead man, they also felt considerable relief. “If someone has gone missing, logic tells you their body has to turn up again one day,” Trachsel said. “It’s obviously good that we can put our efforts into recovering someone, especially after 30 years, and knowing how important it is for the family to find out what happened.” The body was taken to the Institute of Forensic Medicine (IRM) at the University of Bern by helicopter for examination and formal identification where it is still being held. Christian Jackowski, a scientist at IRM, said the discovery of human remains was now a regular feature of the Swiss summer holiday season, as climbers started to swarm the Valais region’s ice-covered mountains. Usually bodies emerged from the ice at the top of the glacier, rather than its “tongue” at the bottom of the valley, Jackowski said. The extent to which bodies have been preserved by the ice depends on the circumstances of the person’s demise, with some human remains having been mummified by sunshine and dry winds before being engulfed in ice, while others have been reduced to skeletons. The majority of bodies are trapped in ice, crevices or streams after an accident or a suicide, though some cases are treated in relation to criminal cases. Other bodies could be the victims of military skirmishes. Though Switzerland stayed neutral in world wars one and two, the Mont Blanc massif became a frontline towards the end of the second world war amid intense fighting between the German army and French resistance fighters. In most cases, forensic experts face a race against time once bodies have been removed from the ice and start to thaw. Dental records and DNA samples are checked against a database of missing people to determine the identity of the corpse. Since 2000, authorities in Switzerland have taken DNA samples of missing people’s family members immediately after their disappearance to facilitate the process.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

NEW YORK, NY, February 28, 2017 Yoshiaki Omura has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.With almost five decades of invaluable contributions to his field, Dr. Omura is renowned for his excellence as a medical researcher and educator. He discovered how to detect cancer from an electro-cardiogram and his work is strongly accepted worldwide. Dr. Omura will be a keynote speaker at the World Congress in Baltimore, MD, on February 20-22, 2017. Dr. Omura was also a keynote speaker on February 8, 2017 at European Parliament in Brussels, Belgium on non-invasive early diagnosis of cancer.Best recognized as the creator of the US patented non-invasive, early diagnostic method of cancer & cardiovascular diseases "Bi-Digital O-Ring Test", Dr. Omura parlays his expertise into roles at New York Medical College, where he is an adjunct professor of family and community medicine. Until 2 years ago, he has been affiliated with the Heart Disease Research Foundation, where he has been the director of medical research since 1972, the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University, where he has been a member of the alumni council since 1986, and the Ukrainian National Medical University, where he has been a professor for more than 10 years in the department of non-orthodox medicine since 1993.Dr. Omura earned an associate degree from Electrical Engineering Dept. of Nihon University, a Bachelor of Science in applied physics from Waseda University, and an MD from Yokohama City University. Upon graduation, Dr. Omura started as a rotating intern at Tokyo University Hospital and subsequently held the same role at Norwalk Hospital in Connecticut. In 1960 he joined Columbia University as a research fellow in cardiovascular surgery, which is the same year he began postgraduate studies in experimental physics. From 1961 until 1965, he worked as a resident physician in oncological surgery at Francis Delafield Hospital, then main cancer institute of Columbia University and towards the end of that role, he earned a Doctor of Science degree from the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University in Pharmaco-electrophysiology of single cardiac cell in vivo & in vitro. Dr. Omura has also worked as a visiting professor at the University of Paris, important research position at INSERM (National Institute of Health of France), visiting professor of Unviersity of Padua, Italy, visiting professor of Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea, visiting professor of Showa University of Tokyo, visiting professor of Chinese Medical School, consultant with the New York Pain Center, and vice chair for the American Board of Forensic Medicine.A diplomate through the International College of Acupuncture and Electro-Therapeutics, the American Academy of Pain Management and the American Academy of Experts in Traumatic Stress, Dr. Omura has contributed his extensive knowledge to a variety of creative works. He is the author of 9 books and has also served on the editorial board of the Scandinavian Journal of Acupuncture and Electrotherapy since 1987, as editor-in-chief of the Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research, International Journal since 1974, and Functional Neurology of Italy from 1988 until 2002. In order to remain abreast of changes in the field, he affiliates himself with the New York Cardiology Society, the American College of Angiology, the American Association of Integrative Medicine, and the life fellow of Royal Society of Medicine of England, as well as many others.A shining example of excellence in his field, Dr. Omura has achieved much throughout his long-standing career, including obtaining seven U.S. and seven Japanese patents in the medical field. In recognition of his efforts, he was named Acupuncture Scientist of the Year through the International Congress of Chinese Medicine in 1989 and earned the World First Qi Gong Scientist of the Year Award through the same organization a year later. Additionally, he has had the honor of being named to Who's Who in American Education, Who's Who in Science and Engineering and Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare. Among the top 100 scientists by International Biographical Institute of Oxford, he was selected.To learn more about Dr. Omura, visit https://www.linkedin.com/in/yoshiaki-omura-m-d-sc-d-42436047 About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | December 8, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A child mummy from the 17th century, found in a crypt underneath a Lithuanian church, was discovered to harbor the oldest known sample of the variola virus that causes smallpox. Researchers who sequenced the virus say it could help answer lingering questions about the history of smallpox, including how recently it appeared in humans (perhaps more recently than we thought) and when specific evolutionary events occurred. Their study appears December 8 in Current Biology. "There have been signs that Egyptian mummies that are 3,000 to 4,000 years old have pockmarked scarring that have been interpreted as cases of smallpox," says first author Ana Duggan, a postdoctoral fellow at the McMaster University Ancient DNA Center in Canada. "The new discoveries really throw those findings into question, and they suggest that the timeline of smallpox in human populations might be incorrect." The research team gathered the disintegrated variola virus DNA from the mummy after obtaining permission from the World Health Organization. Using RNA baits designed from existing variola sequences, the researchers targeted variola sequences found within the extracted DNA from the mummy's skin. Then they reconstructed the entire genome of the ancient strain of the virus and compared it to versions of the variola virus genome dating from the mid-1900s and before its eradication in the late 1970s. They concluded that these samples shared a common viral ancestor that originated sometime between 1588 and 1645--dates that coincide with a period of exploration, migration, and colonization that would have helped spread smallpox around the globe. "So now that we have a timeline, we have to ask whether the earlier documented historical evidence of smallpox, which goes back to Ramses V and includes everything up to the 1500s, is real," says co-author Henrik Poinar, the director of the Ancient DNA Centre at McMaster University in Canada. "Are these indeed real cases of smallpox, or are these misidentifications, which we know is very easy to do, because it is likely possible to mistake smallpox for chicken pox and measles." In addition to providing a more accurate timeline for the evolution of smallpox, the researchers were also able to identify distinct periods of viral evolution. One of the clearest instances of this occurred around the time that Edward Jenner famously developed his vaccine against the virus in the 18th century. During this period, the variola virus appears to have split into two strains, variola major and variola minor, which suggests that vaccination, which led to eradication of smallpox, may have changed the selection pressures acting on the virus and caused it to split into two strains. The researchers hope to use this work to identify how the sample they discovered in Lithuania compares to others that were sweeping throughout other countries in Europe at the same time. But in the bigger context of smallpox research, the scientists are optimistic that their work will provide a stepping stone to allow virologists to continue to trace smallpox and other DNA viruses back through time. "Now we know all the evolution of the sampled strains dates from 1650, but we still don't know when smallpox first appeared in humans, and we don't know what animal it came from, and we don't know that because we don't have any older historical samples to work with," says co-author Edward Holmes, a professor at the University of Sydney in Australia. "So this does put a new perspective on this very important disease, but it's also showing us that our historical knowledge of viruses is just the tip of the iceberg." This work was supported by the McMaster Ancient DNA Centre at McMaster University, the Department of Virology at the University of Helsinki, the Department of Anatomy, Histology and Anthropology at Vilnius University, the Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Science and Biotechnology at the University of Melbourne, the Department of History at Duke University, the Department of Biology at McMaster University, UC Irvine, the Mycroarray in Michigan, the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Michigan, the Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics at Northern Arizona University, the Laboratoire d'Anthropologie Biologique Paul Broca at the PSL Research University, Helsinki University Hospital, the Department of Forensic Medicine at the University of Helsinki, the Department of Pathology at the University of Cambridge, the Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research at McMaster University and the Humans & the Microbiome Program at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. Current Biology, Duggan, Marciniak, Poinar, Emery, Poinar et al: "17th Century Variola Virus Reveals the Recent History of Smallpox" http://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(16)31324-0 Current Biology (@CurrentBiology), published by Cell Press, is a bimonthly journal that features papers across all areas of biology. Current Biology strives to foster communication across fields of biology, both by publishing important findings of general interest and through highly accessible front matter for non-specialists. Visit: http://www. . To receive Cell Press media alerts, contact press@cell.com.


Dublin, Dec. 21, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of Jain PharmaBiotech's new report "Molecular Diagnostics - Technologies, Markets and Companies" to their offering. This report describes and evaluates the molecular diagnostics technologies that will play an important role in practice of medicine, public health, pharmaceutical industry, forensics and biological warfare in the 21st century. This includes several polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technologies, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), peptide nucleic acids (PNA), electrochemical detection of DNA, sequencing, mitochondrial DNA, biochips, nanotechnology and proteomic technologies. Initial applications of molecular diagnostics were mostly for infections but are now increasing in the areas of genetic disorders, preimplantation screening and cancer. Genetic screening tests, despite some restrictions is a promising area for future expansion of in vitro diagnostic market. Molecular diagnostics is being combined with therapeutics and forms an important component of integrated healthcare. Molecular diagnostic technologies are also involved in development of personalized medicine based on pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics. Currently, there has been a considerable interest in developing rapid diagnostic methods for for point-of-care and biowarfare agents such as anthrax. The number of companies involved in molecular diagnostics has increased remarkably during the past few years. More than 1,000 companies have been identified to be involved in developing molecular diagnostics and 342 of these are profiled in the report along with tabulation of 811 collaborations. Despite the strict regulation, most of the development in molecular diagnostics has taken place in the United States, which has the largest number of companies. The markets for molecular diagnostics technologies are difficult to estimate. Molecular diagnostics markets overlap with markets for non-molecular diagnostic technologies in the in vitro diagnostic market and are less well defined than those for pharmaceuticals. Molecular diagnostic markets are analyzed for 2015 according to technologies, applications and geographical regions. Forecasts are made up to 2025. A major portion of the molecular diagnostic market can be attributed to advances in genomics and proteomics. Biochip and nanobiotechnology are expected to make a significant contribution to the growth of molecular diagnostics. Benefits of this report: - This report has evolved during the past 20 years, profiting from feedback by numerous readers and experts. - The most comprehensive and up-to-date one-stop source of information on technical and commercial aspects of molecular diagnostics. - Includes profiles of 343 companies, the largest number in any report on this topic. - 600 references, cited in the report are included in the bibliography. - The text is supplemented by 101 tables and 15 figures. Key Topics Covered: Part I: Technologies & Applications Executive Summary 1. Introduction 2. Molecular Diagnostic Technologies 3. Biochips, Biosensors, and Nanobiotechnology 4. Proteomic Technologies for Molecular Diagnostics 5. Molecular Diagnosis of Genetic Disorders 6. Molecular diagnosis of cardiovascular disorders 7. Molecular Diagnosis of Infections 8. Molecular Diagnosis of Cancer 9. Molecular Diagnostics in Biopharmaceutical Industry & Healthcare 10. Molecular Diagnostics in Forensic Medicine and Biological Warfare 11. References Part II: Regulations, Markets & Companies 12. Ethics, Patents and Regulatory issues 13. Markets for Molecular Diagnostics 14. Companies involved in molecular diagnostics For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/pqgfm8/molecular


Research and Markets has announced the addition of Jain PharmaBiotech's new report "Molecular Diagnostics - Technologies, Markets and Companies" to their offering. This report describes and evaluates the molecular diagnostics technologies that will play an important role in practice of medicine, public health, pharmaceutical industry, forensics and biological warfare in the 21st century. This includes several polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technologies, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), peptide nucleic acids (PNA), electrochemical detection of DNA, sequencing, mitochondrial DNA, biochips, nanotechnology and proteomic technologies. Initial applications of molecular diagnostics were mostly for infections but are now increasing in the areas of genetic disorders, preimplantation screening and cancer. Genetic screening tests, despite some restrictions is a promising area for future expansion of in vitro diagnostic market. Molecular diagnostics is being combined with therapeutics and forms an important component of integrated healthcare. Molecular diagnostic technologies are also involved in development of personalized medicine based on pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics. Currently, there has been a considerable interest in developing rapid diagnostic methods for for point-of-care and biowarfare agents such as anthrax. The number of companies involved in molecular diagnostics has increased remarkably during the past few years. More than 1,000 companies have been identified to be involved in developing molecular diagnostics and 342 of these are profiled in the report along with tabulation of 811 collaborations. Despite the strict regulation, most of the development in molecular diagnostics has taken place in the United States, which has the largest number of companies. The markets for molecular diagnostics technologies are difficult to estimate. Molecular diagnostics markets overlap with markets for non-molecular diagnostic technologies in the in vitro diagnostic market and are less well defined than those for pharmaceuticals. Molecular diagnostic markets are analyzed for 2015 according to technologies, applications and geographical regions. Forecasts are made up to 2025. A major portion of the molecular diagnostic market can be attributed to advances in genomics and proteomics. Biochip and nanobiotechnology are expected to make a significant contribution to the growth of molecular diagnostics. Benefits of this report: - This report has evolved during the past 20 years, profiting from feedback by numerous readers and experts. - The most comprehensive and up-to-date one-stop source of information on technical and commercial aspects of molecular diagnostics. - Includes profiles of 343 companies, the largest number in any report on this topic. - 600 references, cited in the report are included in the bibliography. - The text is supplemented by 101 tables and 15 figures. Key Topics Covered: Part I: Technologies & Applications Executive Summary 1. Introduction 2. Molecular Diagnostic Technologies 3. Biochips, Biosensors, and Nanobiotechnology 4. Proteomic Technologies for Molecular Diagnostics 5. Molecular Diagnosis of Genetic Disorders 6. Molecular diagnosis of cardiovascular disorders 7. Molecular Diagnosis of Infections 8. Molecular Diagnosis of Cancer 9. Molecular Diagnostics in Biopharmaceutical Industry & Healthcare 10. Molecular Diagnostics in Forensic Medicine and Biological Warfare 11. References Part II: Regulations, Markets & Companies 12. Ethics, Patents and Regulatory issues 13. Markets for Molecular Diagnostics 14. Companies involved in molecular diagnostics For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/mbb45q/molecular Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716


MARINA DEL REY, CA--(Marketwired - November 10, 2016) - Dr. Andrew Campbell, the twelve-time award winner for excellence in health care and the treatment of patients, will serve as Program Chairman and featured lecturer at the Innovision conference entitled, "Gut-Brain Relationship" in Marina del Rey, California on Nov 11-12. Previously Board Certified in Family Medicine, Geriatrics, and Forensic Medicine, with over 80 peer-reviewed articles published, Dr. Campbell has transitioned to focus on holistic and naturopathic lifestyles. His keynote presentation at this conference will be an expose of his 40 years in the medical field, coupled with his most recently published book, "Silent But Deadly: Why Inflammation Kills Millions and How to Eliminate It." Dr. Campbell will also share with attendees in inspirational detail about his concentrated study, evidence-based techniques and proven results on the gut-brain relationship, concerning the history of processed foods, environmental changes, and how even some of the smells that we have come to love could make us more susceptible to sickness. Dr. Campbell continues to carry on his personal mission of putting the care back in healthcare by educating attendees on the body's need to lower the acidity of the blood to ward off heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. When asked why people have not heard more about this, Dr. Campbell said, "I am not beholden to insurance companies or big pharma. I have zero personal agenda. I'm out to speak the truth and bring you the facts." This engagement will be an unforgettable and life changing event. For more information on Dr. Andrew Campbell, check out his new website, www.drandrewcampbell.com, and also www.wellness-breakthrough.com, or email us at support@drandrewcampbell.com.

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