Time filter

Source Type

Weinberg Z.G.,Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit | Khanal P.,Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit | Yildiz C.,Atatürk University | Chen Y.,Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit
Animal Feed Science and Technology | Year: 2010

The objective was to study effects of cultivar, stage of maturity at harvest, wilting, and addition of lactic acid bacterial (LAB) inoculant at ensiling, and their interactions, on the aerobic stability of wheat silages. Wheat of two cultivars, harvested at the flowering or the milk stage of maturity were ensiled in mini-silos, either directly after cutting (DC) or after wilting (W). After 2-7 months of storage, silages were subjected to a 7-day aerobic stability test during which changes in chemical composition, dry matter (DM) and neutral detergent fiber (aNDF) digestibility, and temperature, as well as DM losses and CO2 production, were measured. Silages from wheat cultivar BH were relatively dry (DM between 287 and 430 g/kg) and were mostly stable upon aerobic exposure. The flowering wheat of cultivar Galil was moister (DM of 199 g/kg), and the DC silages were stable upon aerobic exposure. Silages of the wilted flowering wheat (DM of 370 g/kg) spoiled and after 4 and 7 days, produced 15 and 76 g/kg DM CO2, respectively. Silages from the milk stage of this cultivar, both DC and W were unstable, and a homofermentative LAB enhanced aerobic spoilage. Factorial analysis of variance was applied to the results with cultivar, stage of maturity, wilting and inoculant as main effects, as well as their interactions. Cultivar and LAB inoculant had effects on silage composition and aerobic stability, with stage of maturity having an effect on aerobic losses, whereas wilting did not have effects on aerobic spoilage indicators. The inoculant enhanced CO2 production in the silages prepared from the DC wheat of the flowering and milk stages, as compared with the respective non-inoculated control silages which contained high concentrations of VFA. However, in the wilted silages which contained less VFA, both control and inoculated silages deteriorated similarly with time of exposure to air. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Weinberg Z.G.,Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit | Szakacs G.,Budapest University of Technology and Economics
Israel Journal of Plant Sciences | Year: 2016

Many plants contain valuable compounds which could be used as pharmaceuticals, nutrients, or cosmetics, etc. The objective of the current review is to describe the ENLAC process (enzyme-assisted solid-state lactic acid fermentation) which enables the preservation of plant biomass and enhances the recovery of valuable natural compounds from plants. The advantages attributed to ENLAC include the possibility of preserving the plant biomass until extraction under mild temperature conditions. Using fibrolytic enzymes, it was possible to increase the yield of extracted protein, chlorophyll and β-carotene from alfalfa silages, and to enhance the extraction of polyphenols from ensiled sage and rosemary. A further development of the process included the use of enzymes produced in situ by fungi under aerobic solid-state fermentation, which lowered the estimated costs of ENLAC considerably. We hope that the review will encourage researchers to pursue ENLAC and develop useful applications for it. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group


Weinberg Z.G.,Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit | Chen Y.,Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit
Animal Feed Science and Technology | Year: 2013

The objective of the current work was to evaluate silage quality throughout the storage period. Silages of wheat from flowering and milk stages and of corn were prepared in 1.5. L anaerobic jars. The silages were sampled from one week until one year after ensiling. Lactic acid concentration peaked one to three months after ensiling while that of acetic acid increased constantly; the aerobic stability of the silages improved with time. Dry matter losses reached maximal levels between 3 and 6 months of storage; digestibility of DM and NDF tended to decrease with time. The results indicate that when using silages shortly after ensiling, the pH values might still not be low enough and aerobic stability is poor. Prolonged storage might result in decrease in DM and NDF digestibility values. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Weinberg Z.G.,Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit | Chen Y.,Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit | Miron D.,Massuot Yizkhak Feeding Center | Raviv Y.,Massuot Yizkhak Feeding Center | And 5 more authors.
Animal Feed Science and Technology | Year: 2011

The objective of the current study was to determine the storage shelf life of wet and semi-dry total mixed rations (TMRs) baled silages under farm conditions. Large bales of wet and semi dry TMR at dry matter (DM) content of 500 and 650g/kg, respectively, weighing 600-750kg were prepared and stored outdoors up to five months during the hot spring and summer months in Israel. Ambient high temperatures were 25-28°C in spring and 33-36°C in summer. A high dry matter density of above 400kg/m 3 was obtained in the bales. During storage there was an intensive build up of lactic acid (>100g/kg DM) and the pH values in both wet and dry TMRs decreased to around 4.3. Dry matter losses during storage were small, but neutral detergent fiber (aNDF) decreased by about 100g/kg during storage. The nutritional parameters including in vitro DM digestibility were hardly changed during storage. Fresh wet and semi-dry TMRs were spoiled, whereas the stored TMRs were stable upon aerobic exposure. In conclusion, during storage of baled TMR wrapped with polyethylene stretch film, an ensiling process takes place, and it is possible to store such bales outdoors for at least up to 4.5 months with enhanced aerobic stability. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Chen Y.,Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit | Weinberg Z.G.,Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2014

Whole-crop wheat and corn silages in 1.5-L anaerobic jars were exposed to air for 0 up to 48. h during their anaerobic storage period to simulate relocation of silages. Ensiling treatments included control (no additives) and either Koffosil T (Koffolk Inc., Petah Tikva, Israel) comprising a mixture of organic acids or Lactobacillus plantarum MTD1 (Ecosyl Products Ltd., Stokesley, UK). In the first set of experiments, the duration of exposure to air had little effect on ensiling parameters or on the aerobic stability of the final silages. In the second set of experiments, both the inoculant and duration of exposure to air had an effect on various fermentation parameters and on the aerobic stability of the final silages. We concluded that if the silages are of good quality, the duration of the relocation process has little effect on silage quality or its aerobic stability. However, if the silage contains any factor that may affect its aerobic stability, it is more sensitive to the time it takes to re-ensile the forage. © 2014 American Dairy Science Association.


Weinberg Z.G.,Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit | Khanal P.,Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit | Yildiz C.,Atatürk University | Chen Y.,Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit | Arieli A.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Grassland Science | Year: 2011

The objective of the present study was to determine the changes that occur in corn (Zea mays) and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) silages during exposure to air, and to try to elucidate the factors that exert silage aerobic stability. Two corn and two sorghum ensiling experiments were performed in mini-silos. After a storage period of 5months, the various silages were subjected to an aerobic stability test in bottle systems, which lasted 7days. In these bottles changes in pH, production of CO2, numbers of yeasts and molds serve as spoilage indicators. Changes in chemical components during aerobic exposure were also followed. The first corn silage was aerobically stable, whereas the second corn silage spoiled; pH values for the unstable silage increased from 3.6 to 4.1 and 5.9, and the CO2 production was 38 and 48gkg-1 DM, after 4 and 7days of aerobic exposure, respectively. The first corn silage that was aerobically stable contained high concentrations of acetic acid, whereas the second corn silage that spoiled had low concentrations of VFA. The two sorghum silages were more stable upon aerobic exposure in spite of their low content of acetic acid, and other volatile fatty acids (VFA), which are known inhibitors of fungi. © 2011 The Volcani Center, Israel. Grassland Science © 2011 Japanese Society of Grassland Science.


PubMed | Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of dairy science | Year: 2013

Whole-crop wheat and corn silages in 1.5-L anaerobic jars were exposed to air for 0 up to 48 h during their anaerobic storage period to simulate relocation of silages. Ensiling treatments included control (no additives) and either Koffosil T (Koffolk Inc., Petah Tikva, Israel) comprising a mixture of organic acids or Lactobacillus plantarum MTD1 (Ecosyl Products Ltd., Stokesley, UK). In the first set of experiments, the duration of exposure to air had little effect on ensiling parameters or on the aerobic stability of the final silages. In the second set of experiments, both the inoculant and duration of exposure to air had an effect on various fermentation parameters and on the aerobic stability of the final silages. We concluded that if the silages are of good quality, the duration of the relocation process has little effect on silage quality or its aerobic stability. However, if the silage contains any factor that may affect its aerobic stability, it is more sensitive to the time it takes to re-ensile the forage.

Loading Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit collaborators
Loading Forage Preservation and By Products Research Unit collaborators