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On 9 May 2017, during an extraordinary general meeting of Baltic Dairy Board Ltd. members, the following decisions were taken: Elected an audit committee, composed of three members of the audit, for 3 years: Ingura Doble, independent audit committee member, LR sworn auditor since 2008 with vast experience in preparation, control and audit of annual reports and consolidated annual reports for companies with various profile, such as producers, traders and innovation performers and different sector, including food industry, companies. Practical experience is regularly updated with theoretical knowledge, also passing it to other industry professionals – accountants- through seminars and publications. Ivo Līdums, independent audit committee member. Member of the Baltic Dairy Board Council, since 28 April 2016. The experience of Ivo Līdums in the last 4 years is related to management, budget planning and follow-up activities of Riela Latvia Ltd. and ILM Ltd. facilitating long-term cooperation with the existing and potential foreign cooperation partners. His duties included preparation of overviews and reports on the sales results, preparation of proposals, and technical specifications, concluding contracts, managing projects, cooperating with the existing and potential clients. In cooperation with Vides Bioenerģētikas un biotehnoloģijas kompetences centrs Ltd., he has successfully participated in scientific activities, in the group that developed an innovative product, he has managed communication between the client and scientists, organised reporting during meetings, as well as participation in the international exhibitions and conferences. Currently, he is studying at the Doctoral Study Programme “Food Science” at the Faculty of Food Technology of the Latvia University of Agriculture. Edgars Cimermanis, independent audit committee member. Currently, holds Investment Director position in ZGI Capital Ltd. and ZGI Real Estate Ltd., where he monitors the venture capital and real estate investments made, as well as explores new investment opportunities, research and marketing. Currently, holds also the CFO position in JSC Mārupes Metālmeistars, where he monitors financial control, budgeting, and follows its progress, as well as deals with other financial and strategic issues. Previously gained five-year work experience in an international audit and business consulting company KPMG Baltics Ltd., where he provided financial advising for companies from various industries, including food industry. Graduated Stockholm School of Economics in Riga. Currently, acquires the international CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) degree in financial analysis. 2. Sworn auditor election for the audit of 2017 Annual Report Sworn auditor company Orients Audit & Finance Ltd., Reg. No. 50003597621, LZRA with license No. 28, was elected for the audit of 2017 Annual Report with 100% of the member votes.


On 9 May 2017, during an extraordinary general meeting of Baltic Dairy Board Ltd. members, the following decisions were taken: Elected an audit committee, composed of three members of the audit, for 3 years: Ingura Doble, independent audit committee member, LR sworn auditor since 2008 with vast experience in preparation, control and audit of annual reports and consolidated annual reports for companies with various profile, such as producers, traders and innovation performers and different sector, including food industry, companies. Practical experience is regularly updated with theoretical knowledge, also passing it to other industry professionals – accountants- through seminars and publications. Ivo Līdums, independent audit committee member. Member of the Baltic Dairy Board Council, since 28 April 2016. The experience of Ivo Līdums in the last 4 years is related to management, budget planning and follow-up activities of Riela Latvia Ltd. and ILM Ltd. facilitating long-term cooperation with the existing and potential foreign cooperation partners. His duties included preparation of overviews and reports on the sales results, preparation of proposals, and technical specifications, concluding contracts, managing projects, cooperating with the existing and potential clients. In cooperation with Vides Bioenerģētikas un biotehnoloģijas kompetences centrs Ltd., he has successfully participated in scientific activities, in the group that developed an innovative product, he has managed communication between the client and scientists, organised reporting during meetings, as well as participation in the international exhibitions and conferences. Currently, he is studying at the Doctoral Study Programme “Food Science” at the Faculty of Food Technology of the Latvia University of Agriculture. Edgars Cimermanis, independent audit committee member. Currently, holds Investment Director position in ZGI Capital Ltd. and ZGI Real Estate Ltd., where he monitors the venture capital and real estate investments made, as well as explores new investment opportunities, research and marketing. Currently, holds also the CFO position in JSC Mārupes Metālmeistars, where he monitors financial control, budgeting, and follows its progress, as well as deals with other financial and strategic issues. Previously gained five-year work experience in an international audit and business consulting company KPMG Baltics Ltd., where he provided financial advising for companies from various industries, including food industry. Graduated Stockholm School of Economics in Riga. Currently, acquires the international CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) degree in financial analysis. 2. Sworn auditor election for the audit of 2017 Annual Report Sworn auditor company Orients Audit & Finance Ltd., Reg. No. 50003597621, LZRA with license No. 28, was elected for the audit of 2017 Annual Report with 100% of the member votes.


DEERFIELD, IL--(Marketwired - May 17, 2017) - The 19th Annual Food Safety Summit, held last week in Rosemont, IL attracted nearly 1,700 registered food safety professionals and 190 exhibiting companies. During the four-day event, held at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center, food safety professionals discussed the most pressing issues facing the food industry including Listeria, the implementation of the Food Safety Modernization Act, the Integration of the Nation's Food Safety System as well as reviewed case studies from recent foodborne illness outbreaks. The event kicked off on Monday, May 8th with six successful certification programs including Preventive Control courses for Human Food, Animal Food, Produce and Foreign Supplier Verification as well as Auditor Training and Seafood HACCP. "Last week, Rosemont was the place for the food safety industry offering informative and timely education sessions, buzz worthy special events, and the newest technologies and solutions for the industry," said Scott Wolters, Director for the Food Safety Summit. "We thank our Educational Advisory Board, our exhibitors, attendees, speakers, and press who came out to support this leading event which addresses the critical food safety issues facing processors, distributors, growers, retailers and foodservice operators." On Tuesday, May 9, Gillian Kelleher, vice president for food safety and quality assurance for Wegmans Food Markets, and Sharon Birkett, VP, North America Quality and Food Protection, OSI Group moderated a half day workshop addressing the Latest in Listeria Control. The dynamic panelists included Doug Craven, Hormel Foods; Natalie Dyenson, MPH, Dole Food Company, Inc.; Joe Stout, Commercial Food Sanitation; Ozgur Koc, Crunch Pak; Steve Tsuyuki, Maple Leaf Foods; Matt Henderson, Land O'Frost; Matthew Wise, MPH, Ph.D., CDC and Mickey Parish, FDA The afternoon workshops include the 3rd Annual AFDO Integration Forum which was hosted by Joe Corby; Preventive Controls & Sanitary Food Transportation Act (SFTA): The Basics and Sustainment, A Guide to Success as a Food Safety Professional and Integrated Food Safety System Update. The Welcome Reception, sponsored by Deloitte, offered attendees an opportunity to network with 190 vendors who showcased specialty products and services designed to help food safety professionals do their job more effectively and efficiently. Industry icon Dane Bernard moderated a dynamic panel of industry experts, on Wednesday morning, who discussed issues ranging from the implementation of FSMA, legal implications including litigation and the role of the Department of Justice to the impact of produce, foreign supplier verification and intentional adulteration during the opening day keynote session. Speakers on the keynote panel included Kathy Gombas, formerly of FDA; Dave Gombas, formerly of United Fresh Produce Association; Craig Wilson, Costco Wholesale Corporation; Jeffery Steger, Department of Justice; and Shawn Stevens, Food Industry Counsel, LLC On Thursday morning, during the 6th Annual Town Hall AFDO's Joe Corby, CDC's Dr. Robert Tauxe, USDA's Al Almanza, and FDA's Stephen Ostroff discussed how the agencies are working together on food safety initiatives and exciting new developments such as Whole Genome Sequencing which will have a revolutionary impact on the industry.  The Town Hall was moderated by Gary Ades, President of G&L Consulting and Chairman of the Summit Educational Advisory Board. On Wednesday evening attendees enjoyed the Food Safety Summit Gives Back Networking Reception to benefit Feeding America. Chuck Wilson of BNP Media presented Mitzi Baum, Director of Food Safety for Feeding America with a donation of $8,000 to help provide 90,000 meals on behalf of the sponsors, speakers, exhibitors, and attendees. In addition, Sani Professional Food Safety Advisory Council presented the 2017 Sani Awards to Tracey McClure, Food Safety Specialist & Training Dept. Administrator, Jason's Deli; Jeremy Benedict, Quality Improvement and Training Coordinator, ASC of SUNY Cortland and Therese O'Connor, Asst. Director Training & Development, Cornell Dinning. "We were very pleased with our showing and support throughout the '17 FSS. Can't wait to begin discussing the 2018 plan!" said Matt Schiering, VP, General Manager, Sani Professional. Prior to the Town Hall, NSF International, a global public health and safety organization that provides food safety and quality assurance services across all food supply chain sectors, announced the recipients of the 2017 NSF Food Safety Leadership Awards. Recipients were Jack J. Guzewich, MPH Consultant and Trainer in Foodborne Disease Epidemiology and Food Emergency Response, David M. Theno, Ph.D. CEO/CBIO, Gray Dog Partners, Inc., and Lee-Ann Jaykus, Ph.D. William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor, Food Science, North Carolina State University. On the trade show floor, 190 exhibiting companies including Gold Sponsor Roka Bioscience, Silver Sponsor Alchemy Systems and Bronze Sponsor Eurofins met with attendees to showcase their new products and services. Two full days of presentations from exhibitors were offered in the Solutions Stage Theaters, as a chance for attendees to hear from subject matter experts about the newest solutions and technologies in food safety and security. Solutions Stage presentations were given by ACO Polymer Products, LUBRIPLATE Lubricants, Roka BioScience, Associated Wholesale Growers/ ReposiTrak, Mettler Toledo, Art's Way Scientific, Brother Mobile Solutions, TEGAM, Verse Solutions, TRI Air Testing, Magnifi Group, Sani Professional, Retokil Steritech, Abbott, Spirax Sarco, ComplianceMetrix, CompWALK, Siemens PLM Software and Detectamet. Plans are already being made for the 20th Anniversary of the Food Safety Summit which will again be held at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont, IL from Monday, May 7 through Thursday, May 10, 2018. In addition, BNP Media will sponsor the Food Safety Summit Education Theater at PROCESS EXPO taking place September 19-22, 2017 at the McCormick Place Convention Center, Chicago, IL. For more information, on sponsorship or exhibiting opportunities call Chuck Wilson at 630-962-0078 or visit www.foodsafetysummit.com. Follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: wineandcraftbeveragenews.com

For some, the art of fermentation is a discovery made later in life. For Dan Young, it has guided him at every turn. Young can’t remember a time when fermentation wasn’t part of his life; from the cider left on the cellar steps to ferment to the family’s active involvement in home brewing. “When I was a boy my uncle and grandfather both used to homebrew and make homemade wines,” said Young. “All pretty rough stuff to be sure, but I was introduced to fermentation at an early age.” Following high school, Young enlisted with the Navy. Stationed in California, he was introduced to one of the kings of craft beers, Sierra Nevada, igniting a desire to study fermentation. “I went to the University of Massachusetts in Amherst and received a degree in Food Science and got a job at Long Trail Brewing Company,” said Young. With education and experience behind him, Young and friend Alden Booth opened a microbrewery in 1996. The People’s Pint in Greenfield, MA was one of the first microbreweries in western Massachusetts, attracting the attention of college students studying in Amherst. One of those students, Nikki Rothwell, attracted the attention of Young. “There was a beautiful woman who came in every Friday. Nikki was getting her PhD in Entomology at UMASS and would head to Greenfield to get out of the college town,” Young explained. It’s here Young’s story takes a twist. Rothwell was offered a job in Leelanau County, MI at the Northwest Horticultural Research Station south of Suttons Bay, nearly a thousand miles away from the People’s Pint. It was a position she couldn’t refuse, so Young was persuaded to leave ‘the Pint” for a new adventure in northern Michigan. By 2004, the duo had married and relocated. Though he was entertaining thoughts of opening another brewery, Young was struck by the fruit-growing region, specifically Michigan-grown apples. Young had participated in a homebrew club during his college years, affording him opportunities to experiment with hard cider. And the idea of locally sourced fruit appealed to Young. “When Alden and I opened The People’s Pint we took great pride in using locally sourced proteins and vegetables and it always kind of bugged me that we had to import our beer ingredients. Moving to Leelanau County, I was struck by the amount of fruit grown here and really began to embrace cider.” Young explained it was a push from Michigan State University that finally helped him settle on cider. “They started a hard cider initiative in 2004 to encourage people to start hard cider businesses,” he said. By that time, Young and Rothwell had taken a trip to England, touring the countryside on a tandem bike. During that time, they discovered public houses dedicated to hard cider. The couple contemplated bringing this cider-centered, pub-like tasting room environment to Leelanau County. In honor of their adventures together, Tandem Ciders opened its doors in 2008. While sourcing fruit primarily from both the Leelanau County and Old Mission Peninsula, Young also planted some older cider varieties on land behind the cider house. “We select apples that ferment well and maintain some of their apple flavors. We don’t have a whole lot of locally grown true cider apples yet, but have had great success with old Michigan standards such as McIntosh, Rhode Island Greening, Northern Spy and Jonathan,” he said. At the time Tandem opened, northern Michigan was growing in popularity for its wine and craft beers. Hard ciders were new on the scene. “At that time, we spent a lot of time explaining what cider was and how it’s the same and different than wine,” said Young. “Now that cider has gained popularity and other cideries have opened near us we have cider tourists.” Today Michigan is home to dozens of cideries. Young said he had to adjust to the nuances of cider making, which differed from brewing beer or fermenting grapes for wine. “In brewing you follow much more of a recipe and you have a lot more control over the process. One can change the amount of malt and the mashing temperatures to achieve certain end results,” said Young, who added ciders are far more about the seasons. “Rain at harvest dilutes the sugars in an apple, a cool year will mean less tannins — in this way cider making is much more like wine making. The big difference between grapes and apples is sugar content. An apple having less sugar, makes less alcohol which makes it harder to hide fermentation faults. It’s a learning process.” Young’s advice to anyone interested in making cider: “Respect the apple. Use good, sound fruit, ferment cold and slow to keep those apple flavors and aromas around and be real wary of adjuncts.” He added, “A little sugar, spice, fruit, or oak can be nice, but in my opinion, as soon as it steals the show from the apple, it’s too much.” For inspiration, Young relies on his involvement with home fermenters, who, said Young, “can experiment with different yeasts and smaller batches of apples.” While Tandem has grown over the years, the tasting room and facilities have remained much the same. Young said he is pushing for growth in distribution. Today, Tandem offers its signature Smackintosh, made with locally sourced McIntosh, Rhode Island Greening, and Northern Spy apples, and Greenman made entirely of Rhode Island Greening in 16 oz. cans with a full line of other hard ciders available in 750 ml bottles. For the past five years, production has increased steadily and last year, Tandem produced approximately 30,000 gallons of cider. “We plan to introduce our Sunny Day in 16 oz. cans this year,” said Young. “Our big plans for expansion are with production. Our growth in the future will be distribution. We plan to keep the tasting room pretty much as it is, with small improvements each year.” This strategy is likely due to the huge success of the quaint tasting room, which allows both locals and out-of-towners to feel welcomed as regulars. Tandem is more than a cider house; it echoes the old world style of both the ciders and the public houses of yesteryear.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

For quite a few years now the pet market's overall focus on wellness has led to many pet owners to pay a lot more attention to their pets' nutrition, scrutinizing ingredients and seeking out premium quality products to ensure that their pets stay healthy and happy. Pet owners are reading ingredient lists, inspecting nutritional claims, and growing more and more aware of how a pet's diet can impact a host of health conditions, including age- and obesity-related issues, anxiety, skin and coat issues, and energy levels. "Pet Supplements in the U.S., 6th Edition" report is a detailed examination of how this wellness trend is playing out in the pet supplements market as marketers seek new ways to make supplements an integral part of their pets' wellness routines. With sales of $580 million in 2016, up 3.5% from the previous year, the pet supplements market is expected to show moderate but steady growth for the foreseeable future, bolstered by a continued focus on health and nutrition in the overall pet market. Pet supplement marketers are competing against a full court press by marketers of functional treats and foods, which are attempting to draw sales away from pet supplements as pet owners seek out ways to address their pets' nutritional needs in more convenient and pet-pampering formats. Condition-specific formulations abound on pet food shelves, and the pet supplements market is responding via new products that provide relief from a range of health issues. Many incorporate ingredients borrowed from human supplements, with digestive health, joint health, anxiety, and brain health among the top sellers. In addition to these condition-specific products, the survey results show that pet owners are attracted to supplements that are made in the U.S. and those with natural/organic ingredients. The report also examines cutting-edge ingredients including cannabidiol (CBD), whose efficacy some pet owners applaud despite hesitance on the part of veterinarians and the National Animal Supplements Council (NASC). Building on the analysis presented in the previous five editions of this report, this fully updated sixth edition of Pet Supplements in the U.S. covers historical and projected retail sales from 2012 through 2021, competitive strategies of key players, and trends in new product development such as alternative formulations, condition-specific products, feline supplements, natural/organic supplements, and carry-overs from the human supplements market, as well as retail channel trends. Featuring exclusive data from the National Pet Owner Survey, the report details pet supplement purchasing trends as well as attitudes and demographic characteristics of pet supplement purchasers. Additional data sources include IRI marketer/brand sales data for mass-market channels and Simmons data profiling pet supplement purchaser attitudes and product preferences. 1.1 The Market - Pet Supplement Sales Experience Modest Growth In 2016 - Condition-Specific Pet Supplement Purchasing By Supplement Type - Dogs Continue To Drive Pet Supplement Sales - Market Outlook - Pet Supplement Regulation 1.3 Marketing & New Product Trends - Joint Health, Digestive Health Top Supplement Types - Competition From Pet Food And Treats - Supplements Address Palatability - Condition-Specific Supplements - Cat Supplements Offer More Than Hairball Relief - Natural Supplements In High Demand - Lifestage-Specific Supplements - Cannabidiol Supplements Generate Interest, Pose Problems 1.4 Retail Trends - Pet Specialty Channel Top Destination For Otc Pet Supplements - Pet Specialty Channel Retailers - Veterinary Channel Marketers And Trends - Mass-Market, Farm & Feed And Natural Food Channels - Online Sales A Growing Channel For Marketers 2. The Market - Chapter Highlights - Introduction - Scope Of Report - Report Methodology - Market Size And Composition - Pet Supplement Sales Experience Modest Growth In 2016 - Condition-Specific Pet Supplement Sales - Pet Supplement Sales By Channel - Mass-Market Pet Supplement Sales By Category - Dogs Continue To Drive Pet Supplement Sales - Market Outlook - Overall Focus On Health, Wellness Impacts Supplement Use - Supplements Compete With Functional Foods, Treats  - Pets With Allergies And Special Food Needs - Senior And Overweight Pets - Natural/Organic Supplements In High Demand - Supplements As Preventive Care May Lower Vet Costs - Pet Supplement Regulation - FDA, Aafco Monitor Pet Supplements - National Animal Supplement Council - The Avma And Pet Supplements - Market Projection 3. The Marketers  - Chapter Highlights - Competitive Overview - Mergers & Acquisitions - Expansion The Name Of The Game - Rebranding Invigorates Brands - System Saver - Marketer Profile: Tropiclean - Marketer Profile: Garmon Corp./Naturvet - Marketer Profile: Food Science Corp. (Vetriscience/Pet Naturals) - Marketer & Brand Shares - Brand Use Across Channels - Pet Specialty Supplements A Popular Choice With Pet Owners - Mass-Market Activity In Pet Supplements 4. Marketing & New Product Trends - Chapter Highlights - Marketing & New Product Trends - Joint Health, Digestive Health Top Supplement Types - Condition Treated, 2016 (Percent Of Pet Product Purchasers) - Competition From Pet Food And Treats - Supplements Address Palatability - Condition-Specific Supplements - Cat Supplements Offer More Than Hairball Relief - Natural Supplements In High Demand - Lifestage-Specific Supplements - Cannabidiol Supplements Generate Interest, Pose Problems 5. Retail Trends - Chapter Highlights - The Retail Landscape - Pet Specialty Channel Top Destination For Otc Pet Supplements - Pet Specialty Channel Retailers - Veterinary Channel Marketers And Trends - Supplements, 2016 (Percent Of Pet Owners) - Mass-Market, Farm & Feed And Natural Food Channels - Online Sales A Growing Channel For Marketers 6. Consumer Trends - Chapter Highlights - Overview Of Pet Supplement Purchasing - Note On Data Sources - Consumer Sentiments & Buying Habits - Dog Owners More Likely To Use Supplements - Made In USA, Natural/Organic Key Pet Supplement Purchasing Sentiments - Pet Supplement Usage Frequency And Expenditures - Pet Supplements Consumer Sentiments - Demographic Trends - Millennials, Homes With Children Skew High For Pet Supplement Use - Simmons Demographic Trends For Pet Supplement Use For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/x2c2bj/pet_supplements Research and Markets is the world's leading source for international market research reports and market data. We provide you with the latest data on international and regional markets, key industries, the top companies, new products and the latest trends. Media Contact: Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716 To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/united-states-pet-supplements-market-2012-2021-2017-report---research-and-markets-300459078.html


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dance Academy USA in Cupertino, California will host San Jose's 95.3 KRTY on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 from 4-6pm. KRTY will be on site at Dance Academy USA and taking entries to win second row seats to Lady Antebellum at Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View on Saturday, May 27, 2017. Lady Antebellum, Kelsea Ballerini and Brett Young will kick off the Shoreline Amphitheater concert season on Saturday, May 27th. Anyone who visits Dance Academy USA on Wednesday, May 24 from 4-6 can submit an entry for a chance to win second row tickets from 95.3 KRTY. Parents and others who stop by Dance Academy USA on Wednesday can observe dance classes in action and get additional information about our upcoming 2017-18 dance season, which will be Dance Academy USA's 27th year in dance education. About Dance Academy USA Dance Academy USA is the largest dance school/studio in California and has served the San Jose area dance community for 27 years; the business is a Bay Area Green Business which offers classes for children in tap, ballet, pointe, jazz, contemporary, lyrical, hip hop and breakdancing; Dance Academy USA was founded in 1990 by James R. and Jane R. Carter; the business has since expanded in size becoming the largest dance school under one-roof in the state of California; the company has over 60 employees and is also known for their award winning competition team which is regarded as one of the most accomplished in the nation. About Dance Academy USA’s Director Jane Carter is: a graduate of San Jose State University with a degree in Human Performance/Fitness and a minor in Nutrition and Food Science; while in college she was selected by Dole Corporation to be the company’s ambassador to promote dance, modeling, and aerobics in Japan; additionally, Ms. Jane is a former dancer for the Golden State Warriors and a professional cheerleader for the San Francisco 49ers; she is also the Former Director of the NBA Warrior Dance Team and former Creator and Director of Arena Football’s San Jose SaberKittens; and finally, in 2014 Mrs. Carter won the most prestigious dance teacher award in the United States of America when Dance Teacher Magazine awarded her the 2014 Dance Teacher of the Year. To learn more about Dance Academy USA, please visit their website at DanceAcademyUSA.com. You can also contact the company by phone at (408) 257-3211 or by email at officeteam(at)danceacademyusa(dot)com.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New knowledge on milk composition and quality is of essential importance to consumers as well as the industry. There are therefore considerable research efforts in milk worldwide. One of the major topics concerns milk's content of different proteins and their importance to human health. Basically, milk consists of two protein types - whey and casein. Casein can be further divided into four categories. One of these, beta casein, attracts particular attention. Several beta casein types exist and A1 and A2 are the most common. It has been suggested that A2-protein milk is a healthier alternative to A1-protein milk, as the latter is claimed to metabolize into potentially detrimental peptides in the intestine. One specific peptide formed during digestion is further claimed to have unfavourable effects on the consumers drinking it. However, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) dismissed these claims in 2009 as undocumented. It is currently debated whether some of the discomfort reported by some milk consumers regarding impact on the gastrointestinal system may be caused by discomfort originating from these detrimental peptides. A2-milk has been labelled a more "original" milk and is closer to breast milk. Foreign companies have succeeded in establishing specialized industries that sell milk that only contains A2-type beta casein. In December 2016, the Danish dairy Thise introduced a Danish variant. This particular area still requires additional research and there is no scientific evidence to substantiate that one protein type is superior compared to the other, states Professor Lotte Bach Larsen, Department of Food Science at Aarhus University: - I acknowledge that further research and examination is required within this particular area in order to base the debate on solid, fact-based argumentation. We cannot rule out that some consumers, who feel discomfort when consuming milk, might benefit from drinking solely A2-milk. In a recently finished investigation, Lotte Bach Larsen and her colleagues from the Department of Food Science cooperated with Norwegian scientists to examine if the two different protein types give rise to different metabolization patterns and thus the formation of potentially bioactive protein fragments. In their examination the scientists used gastric and intestinal juices from humans to study how enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract break down the proteins. The experiment was accomplished in a laboratory model system and using protein types that were purified from milk from cows whose milk contained either solely A1 or A2 variants of the protein. - The examination demonstrates - quite as expected - that a number of different peptides is formed from both protein types, when the milk is metabolized. But, it also turns out that the peptide in question is actually present when both A1 and A2 milk is digested. However, the content of this specific peptide formed from A1 beta casein protein variant by the human digestion enzymes was approx. three times higher than liberated from the A2 beta casein variant. As this study was carried out with purified beta casein variants, there is a need to examine whether there is a difference in content of this specific peptide, if digestion is going on using milk and not simply isolated beta casein proteins. In addition, it would be beneficial to carry out a proper human intervention study on eventual the effects when consuming the two different types of milk, and also examine if the peptide can be measured in the blood, says Lotte Bach Larsen. Another interesting aspect when discussing the difference between A1 and A2 milk is the fact that milk containing the A2-type beta casein is actually the most frequent type in Danish dairy cattle. Scientists from the Department of Food Science were able to conclude this fact when they - in connection with a major research project - carried out a screening of the protein composition of Danish milk. Actually, the frequency of the A2 protein was almost the same in both Danish Jersey cattle and Danish Holstein cattle. - It is rather interesting if consumers consider A2 milk to be something unique and special. We should point out that even though most of the Danish milk is mixed, dairy milk will normally contain both types, but with levels of the A2 type over the A1 type, as it seems that A2 is present in highest frequency over the A1 vatiant. If you choose a milk type that specifically contains the A2 protein of the beta casein, you should know that this milk comes from cows that have been screened for the variants and selected for this production, says Lotte Bach Larsen. She hopes that the future will bring an increased focus on studies in the metabolism of milk proteins in human studies. Basically, milk consists of two protein types - whey and casein. Casein can be further divided into four categories, and one of these, beta casein, attracts particular attention. Several beta casein types exist and A1 and A2 are the most common. The difference between the two types consists of two changed amino acids.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A diet supplemented with soy protein may be an effective adjunct therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases, Penn State researchers reported after completing a study that included mice and cultured human colon cells. The findings are significant because inflammatory bowel diseases -- including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease -- are characterized by either continuous or periodic inflammation of the colon and represent a significant risk factor for colon cancer. Also known as IBD, inflammatory bowel diseases affect nearly 4 million people worldwide and have an economic impact of more than $19 billion annually in the United States alone. The development of dietary strategies to mitigate IBD is of considerable public health importance, said Joshua Lambert, associate professor of food science in the College of Agricultural Sciences. He said his team found that soy-protein concentrate can exert antioxidant and cytoprotective effects in cultured human bowel cells and can moderate the severity of inflammation in mice that have an induced condition similar to ulcerative colitis. Zachary Bitzer and Amy Wopperer, former graduate students in the Department of Food Science and the lead researchers, substituted soy-protein concentrate into the diet of the mice and removed corresponding amounts of the other protein sources, equaling about 12 percent. They kept human equivalents in mind as they determined the amount. "We didn't want to get carried away with using doses that were really high and would crowd out all the other protein that was there," Bitzer said. "Instead, we wanted to find a scenario that was going to fit into a more human-relevant situation." The dietary soy-protein concentrate at the 12-percent dose level ameliorated body-weight loss and swelling of the spleen in the mice with induced inflammatory bowel disease. "Soy-protein concentrate mitigates markers of colonic inflammation and loss of gut barrier function in the mice with induced IBD," Wopperer said. Follow-on studies will focus on whether the results of this research with mice, published in The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, are readily translatable to people. Because soy protein is a widely used food ingredient -- often used as a meat substitute and commonly referred to as "texturized vegetable proteins" in ingredient lists -- Lambert believes human studies could be arranged in the near future. "Since it is already out there commercially, that makes it more straightforward," he said. "But practically speaking, the actual clinical studies are a little bit out of our area of expertise. I think the most likely thing to happen will be for us to try to identify a collaborator either through the Clinical Translational Science Institute on campus or with someone at the Penn State College of Medicine Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center." However, Lambert's laboratory soon will start a related investigation of whether the inflammation-moderating effects triggered in the mouse colons are due solely to the soy protein or also may be caused by soy fiber. Soy-protein concentrate is 70 percent protein by weight, but it also has quite a bit of soybean fiber in it, he explained. Also participating in the study were Benjamin Chrisfield, a master's degree student in food science; Ling Tao, a former doctoral student in food science; Timothy Cooper, associate professor of comparative medicine at the Penn State College of Medicine; and Jairam Vanamala, Ryan Elias and John Hayes, all associate professors of food science, Penn State. Technical assistance and primer synthesis services were provided by the Penn State Genomics Core Facility. The Pennsylvania Soybean Board, the American Institute for Cancer Research and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Hatch Program supported this research. Both Wopperer and Bitzer were supported in part by the Roger and Barbara Claypoole Distinguished Graduate Fellowship in the College of Agricultural Sciences.

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