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News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A diet supplemented with soy protein may be an effective adjunct therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases, Penn State researchers reported after completing a study that included mice and cultured human colon cells. The findings are significant because inflammatory bowel diseases -- including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease -- are characterized by either continuous or periodic inflammation of the colon and represent a significant risk factor for colon cancer. Also known as IBD, inflammatory bowel diseases affect nearly 4 million people worldwide and have an economic impact of more than $19 billion annually in the United States alone. The development of dietary strategies to mitigate IBD is of considerable public health importance, said Joshua Lambert, associate professor of food science in the College of Agricultural Sciences. He said his team found that soy-protein concentrate can exert antioxidant and cytoprotective effects in cultured human bowel cells and can moderate the severity of inflammation in mice that have an induced condition similar to ulcerative colitis. Zachary Bitzer and Amy Wopperer, former graduate students in the Department of Food Science and the lead researchers, substituted soy-protein concentrate into the diet of the mice and removed corresponding amounts of the other protein sources, equaling about 12 percent. They kept human equivalents in mind as they determined the amount. "We didn't want to get carried away with using doses that were really high and would crowd out all the other protein that was there," Bitzer said. "Instead, we wanted to find a scenario that was going to fit into a more human-relevant situation." The dietary soy-protein concentrate at the 12-percent dose level ameliorated body-weight loss and swelling of the spleen in the mice with induced inflammatory bowel disease. "Soy-protein concentrate mitigates markers of colonic inflammation and loss of gut barrier function in the mice with induced IBD," Wopperer said. Follow-on studies will focus on whether the results of this research with mice, published in The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, are readily translatable to people. Because soy protein is a widely used food ingredient -- often used as a meat substitute and commonly referred to as "texturized vegetable proteins" in ingredient lists -- Lambert believes human studies could be arranged in the near future. "Since it is already out there commercially, that makes it more straightforward," he said. "But practically speaking, the actual clinical studies are a little bit out of our area of expertise. I think the most likely thing to happen will be for us to try to identify a collaborator either through the Clinical Translational Science Institute on campus or with someone at the Penn State College of Medicine Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center." However, Lambert's laboratory soon will start a related investigation of whether the inflammation-moderating effects triggered in the mouse colons are due solely to the soy protein or also may be caused by soy fiber. Soy-protein concentrate is 70 percent protein by weight, but it also has quite a bit of soybean fiber in it, he explained. Also participating in the study were Benjamin Chrisfield, a master's degree student in food science; Ling Tao, a former doctoral student in food science; Timothy Cooper, associate professor of comparative medicine at the Penn State College of Medicine; and Jairam Vanamala, Ryan Elias and John Hayes, all associate professors of food science, Penn State. Technical assistance and primer synthesis services were provided by the Penn State Genomics Core Facility. The Pennsylvania Soybean Board, the American Institute for Cancer Research and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Hatch Program supported this research. Both Wopperer and Bitzer were supported in part by the Roger and Barbara Claypoole Distinguished Graduate Fellowship in the College of Agricultural Sciences.


On 9 May 2017, during an extraordinary general meeting of Baltic Dairy Board Ltd. members, the following decisions were taken: Elected an audit committee, composed of three members of the audit, for 3 years: Ingura Doble, independent audit committee member, LR sworn auditor since 2008 with vast experience in preparation, control and audit of annual reports and consolidated annual reports for companies with various profile, such as producers, traders and innovation performers and different sector, including food industry, companies. Practical experience is regularly updated with theoretical knowledge, also passing it to other industry professionals – accountants- through seminars and publications. Ivo Līdums, independent audit committee member. Member of the Baltic Dairy Board Council, since 28 April 2016. The experience of Ivo Līdums in the last 4 years is related to management, budget planning and follow-up activities of Riela Latvia Ltd. and ILM Ltd. facilitating long-term cooperation with the existing and potential foreign cooperation partners. His duties included preparation of overviews and reports on the sales results, preparation of proposals, and technical specifications, concluding contracts, managing projects, cooperating with the existing and potential clients. In cooperation with Vides Bioenerģētikas un biotehnoloģijas kompetences centrs Ltd., he has successfully participated in scientific activities, in the group that developed an innovative product, he has managed communication between the client and scientists, organised reporting during meetings, as well as participation in the international exhibitions and conferences. Currently, he is studying at the Doctoral Study Programme “Food Science” at the Faculty of Food Technology of the Latvia University of Agriculture. Edgars Cimermanis, independent audit committee member. Currently, holds Investment Director position in ZGI Capital Ltd. and ZGI Real Estate Ltd., where he monitors the venture capital and real estate investments made, as well as explores new investment opportunities, research and marketing. Currently, holds also the CFO position in JSC Mārupes Metālmeistars, where he monitors financial control, budgeting, and follows its progress, as well as deals with other financial and strategic issues. Previously gained five-year work experience in an international audit and business consulting company KPMG Baltics Ltd., where he provided financial advising for companies from various industries, including food industry. Graduated Stockholm School of Economics in Riga. Currently, acquires the international CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) degree in financial analysis. 2. Sworn auditor election for the audit of 2017 Annual Report Sworn auditor company Orients Audit & Finance Ltd., Reg. No. 50003597621, LZRA with license No. 28, was elected for the audit of 2017 Annual Report with 100% of the member votes.


On 9 May 2017, during an extraordinary general meeting of Baltic Dairy Board Ltd. members, the following decisions were taken: Elected an audit committee, composed of three members of the audit, for 3 years: Ingura Doble, independent audit committee member, LR sworn auditor since 2008 with vast experience in preparation, control and audit of annual reports and consolidated annual reports for companies with various profile, such as producers, traders and innovation performers and different sector, including food industry, companies. Practical experience is regularly updated with theoretical knowledge, also passing it to other industry professionals – accountants- through seminars and publications. Ivo Līdums, independent audit committee member. Member of the Baltic Dairy Board Council, since 28 April 2016. The experience of Ivo Līdums in the last 4 years is related to management, budget planning and follow-up activities of Riela Latvia Ltd. and ILM Ltd. facilitating long-term cooperation with the existing and potential foreign cooperation partners. His duties included preparation of overviews and reports on the sales results, preparation of proposals, and technical specifications, concluding contracts, managing projects, cooperating with the existing and potential clients. In cooperation with Vides Bioenerģētikas un biotehnoloģijas kompetences centrs Ltd., he has successfully participated in scientific activities, in the group that developed an innovative product, he has managed communication between the client and scientists, organised reporting during meetings, as well as participation in the international exhibitions and conferences. Currently, he is studying at the Doctoral Study Programme “Food Science” at the Faculty of Food Technology of the Latvia University of Agriculture. Edgars Cimermanis, independent audit committee member. Currently, holds Investment Director position in ZGI Capital Ltd. and ZGI Real Estate Ltd., where he monitors the venture capital and real estate investments made, as well as explores new investment opportunities, research and marketing. Currently, holds also the CFO position in JSC Mārupes Metālmeistars, where he monitors financial control, budgeting, and follows its progress, as well as deals with other financial and strategic issues. Previously gained five-year work experience in an international audit and business consulting company KPMG Baltics Ltd., where he provided financial advising for companies from various industries, including food industry. Graduated Stockholm School of Economics in Riga. Currently, acquires the international CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) degree in financial analysis. 2. Sworn auditor election for the audit of 2017 Annual Report Sworn auditor company Orients Audit & Finance Ltd., Reg. No. 50003597621, LZRA with license No. 28, was elected for the audit of 2017 Annual Report with 100% of the member votes.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The theory behind Musical Pairing®, a patent-pending method of matching music to food using a simple mathematical formula, has been confirmed by a peer-reviewed study published in the Advances in Nutrition and Food Science Journal. More than 90% of study participants reported a noticeable increase in the enjoyment of a dish when properly paired with music using the Musical Pairing algorithm. Chef and author Barbara Werner formulated the methodology to help individuals find the best beverage to complement their meal and then elevate their dining experience by accompanying it with a selection of properly paired music. Musical Pairing is based on three interrelated hypotheses. The first is that music can influence how food is perceived and appreciated. The second is that a simple mathematical formula can define this relationship (Musical Pairing®). The third is that this knowledge can be used to enhance (or detract from) the enjoyment of a meal. The pairing is accomplished by assigning a numerical value to the components of a meal and then finding a musical match of equal value. The present study tested the validity of these hypotheses by observing if one can alter the dining experience by manipulating the music according to the Musical Pairing algorithms. Test dinners were held in five U.S. states, with subject diners unaware they were taking part in a research experiment to avoid pre-conceived opinion. The study found that 62 out of 67 subjects (93%) found the dish to be more enjoyable when properly matched using the Musical Pairing algorithm. There was a statistically significant difference in the reported flavors of a dish when certain music selections were introduced. Also, a significant number of attendees felt that the music affected the dining experience for a period of time after the dinner. These data confirm that using a mathematical formula to pair music and food can have a positive outcome on the diner’s experience. Scientists had previously corroborated this idea: Research by American psychologist Linda May Bartoshuk, Phd, on the ‘psychophysics of taste’ and Dr. Charles Spence, an experimental psychologist and head of the University of Oxford's Crossmodal Research Laboratory, as well as many others have addressed various aspects of taste and its effect on the senses. Unaware that they were designed for research, Fodor’s named these Musical Pairing dinners as one of the top 10 can’t miss pop-up experiences. Ms. Werner and Musical Pairing have been showcased at beer, wine and spirit festivals and culinary events around the country, and Ms. Werner has been interviewed by food writers and bloggers. Ms. Werner and her team are continuing to tour the country to bring their culinary revolution to all foodies, holding dinners at restaurants and teaching the technique so guests can elevate their dining experience at home. Music Pairing is licensed by BMI and ASCAP, and all music was obtained via Spotify and iTunes and transmitted through headphones. The study was carried out using research parameters recommended by Christopher Currie PhD and in cooperation with Robert Bernstein, MD. Musical Pairing® has completed dinners from San Francisco to NY using their mathematical technique to match music with food via a formula . . .–Barron’s 16 March 2016


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CHICAGO - A study published in the Journal of Food Science found that expectations of product quality, nutritional content and the amount of money consumers were willing to pay increased when consumers saw a product labeled "all-natural" as compared to the same product without the label. Researchers at Ohio State University used virtual reality technology to simulate a grocery store taste-test of peanut butter. In one condition, consumers were asked by a server to evaluate identical products with only one being labeled all-natural. In the other, the server additionally emphasized the all-natural status of the one sample. In the first condition, expectations of product quality and nutritional content increased, but not liking or willingness to pay additional for the all-natural product. However, expectations of product quality and nutritional content as well the amount of money subjects were willing to pay increased further when a virtual in-store server identified one of the peanut butters as being made with all-natural ingredients. This result was observed across a diverse group of subjects indicating the broad impact of the all-natural label. Currently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not provided a clear definition of the phrases "natural" or "all natural", despite extensive use in U.S. product marketing. Prior research has indicated that consumers define "natural" primarily by the absence of "undesirable" attributes such as additives and human intervention, as opposed to the presence of specific positive qualities. "We believe our findings provide sound, evidence-based guidance to the FDA and suggest the term natural be regulated so as to minimize consumer and manufacturer confusion over the term. This will serve to protect America's consumers and manufacturers by ensuring food labels convey accurate and non-misleading information," lead author of the study Christopher T. Simons, Ph.D., explained. View the abstract in the Journal of Food Science here. Founded in 1939, the Institute of Food Technologists is committed to advancing the science of food. Our non-profit scientific society--more than 17,000 members from more than 95 countries--brings together food scientists, technologists and related professionals from academia, government, and industry. For more information, please visit ift.org.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dance Academy USA Production Company (DAUPC), the renowned San Jose dance school’s premier competition team, has announced it will be holding auditions for the 2018 team on March 11-12, 2017. Note: DAUPC is the largest youth dance competition team in California. The Dance Academy USA Production Company is an accelerated training program for those dance students who want competition-level performance opportunities. Dancers are required to take additional performance and technique classes and membership invitations are offered on an audition-only basis. All DAUPC members must re-audition every year, as the team is highly competitive, with slots available only for the most advanced dancers. DAUPC has participated in countless dance competitions over a 27 year period, and, in nearly each and every case, they have returned home with dozens of top awards. For instance, Dance Academy USA Production Company was awarded eighteen platinum trophies (at the Hollywood Connection Competition in January, 2017) which is the highest possible award; additionally, three DAUPC routines received TITANIUM which means a near perfect score from the judges; and finally, twenty one routines earned first place in their respective genres. Further, at the Spotlight Competition in February, 2017 - DAUPC scored an astonishing fifty one awards total; seventeen routines received a diamond; eleven routines earned a special judges award; and, the DAUPC soloists received thirteen diamond awards and nine received a special judge’s award. “DAUPC is highly competitive and truly represents the best of the best in Silicon Valley,” said Dance Academy USA Owner and Director, Jane Carter. “Nobody is given special treatment - all dancers have to not only earn their spots on the team, but work to keep their spots. That’s why we require all of our dancers to audition for the team each and every year - nothing’s a given.” Jane Carter founded DAUPC in 1991 and has been the director ever since. About the Director: in 2013, Ms. Jane was awarded America’s Dance Educator of the Year by Co. Dance; in 2014, she won the most prestigious dance teacher award in the United States of America. Dance Teacher Magazine awarded Ms. Jane the 2014 Dance Teacher Award in the Private Studio/Conservatory Category. She was presented this extraordinary honor in New York City. There is no higher honor in the dance education industry. “While we expect a great deal from our Production Company dancers,” Carter said, “as a reward for the amount of time spent dancing together, our students develop strong bonds of friendship with their fellow dancers. We are very proud of their technique and their performance ability, but it is their love for one another that we are most proud.” Dance Academy USA is the largest dance studio in Northern California and has served the San Jose area dance community for 27 years. The business is a Bay Area Green Business which offers classes in tap, ballet, pointe, jazz, contemporary, lyrical, hip hop and breakdancing. Dance Academy USA is also known for their award winning competition team which is regarded as one of the most accomplished in the nation. To learn more about Dance Academy, please visit their website at DanceAcademyUSA.com. You can also contact DAU by phone at (408) 257-3211 or by email at officeteam(at)danceacademyusa(dot)com. More about the company: Dance Academy USA was founded in 1990 by James R. and Jane R. Carter; the business has since expanded in size, becoming the largest dance school in Northern California with a staff of over 60 employees; Jane Carter is a graduate of San Jose State University with a degree in Human Performance/Fitness and a minor in Nutrition and Food Science; while in college she was selected by Dole Corporation to be the company’s ambassador to promote dance, modeling, and aerobics in Japan; additionally, Jane is a former dancer for the Golden State Warriors and a professional cheerleader for the San Francisco 49ers; and finally, she is the Former Director of the NBA Warrior Dance Team and former Creator and Director of Arena Football’s San Jose SaberKittens.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

At dairies, the reverse osmosis filtration technique is extensively used to remove water from milk to be used for further processing such as e.g. cheese or milk powder. However, many resources would be saved if it was possible to move this process to the farms, since you would reduce the amount of water transported. In cooperation with the Danish dairy company, Arla, PhD student Ida Sørensen and Associate Professor Lars Wiking from Department of Food Science at Aarhus University have examined how milk quality is affected when concentrating the milk is carried out on-farm. The researchers at Aarhus University have analyzed experiments with both the so-called ultrafiltration, which is supposed be more gentle to the milk, and with the reverse osmosis technique, which requires a higher pressure on the milk but also retains the lactose which may be an advantage in for example milk powder. Neither the total bacterial count, or the FFA-levels nor the protein breakdown were negatively affected by reverse osmosis; the concentrated milk could very well be used for both cheese and milk powder. Analyses also demonstrate that the quality and durability of milk powder made from concentrated milk is the same as for powder made from ordinary milk; in cheese, however, there is a minor difference as to how the enzymes react; and in the experiments, concentrated milk coagulated approximately ten minutes later than regular milk. Significant interest -- but is it worthwhile? Concentration of milk on the farm, or during transport from farm to dairy, is carried out in many other countries in the world, e.g. in Texas, USA, where both herds and distances are huge. Different models exist as to how on-farm milk concentration may become a reality. The farmer may buy the filtration equipment himself and achieve an additional price for the milk. Or perhaps the dairy could buy, maintain and service the filtration installation or it could be acquired through some kind of leasing agreement. Herd size and distance to the dairy in particular, are of major importance when considering resources and profitability, as small installations typically use more power than one large installation, says Ida Sørensen; she has just presented the results of the studies at a major conference in Dublin. "New sustainable milk concentration technology for dairy herds" is a five year project which ends this year. Project participants include Arla Foods amba/Arla Foods Ingredi­ents PS (Arla), Danmarks Kvægforskningscenter (the Danish Cattle Research Center - DKC) and Aarhus University (AU). In addition, GEA Process Engineering (GEA) is affiliated as an external consultant. The project is financially supported by Mælkeafgiftsfonden (Milk Taxation Foundation - MAF) and the Green Development and Demonstration Programme (GUDP).


New topics in "Foodborne Diseases" include nanotechnology, bioterrorism and the use of foodborne pathogens, antimicrobial resistance, antibiotic resistance CAMBRIDGE, MA--(Marketwired - February 16, 2017) - Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, today announced the publication of an updated version of Foodborne Diseases, edited by Christine Dodd, Tim Aldsworth and Richard Stein. This foundational reference offers a practical understanding of diseases to help researchers and scientists manage foodborne illnesses and prevent and control outbreaks. At the same time, Elsevier announced four additional food science books. Foodborne Diseases, Third Edition, covers the ever-changing complex issues that have emerged in the food industry during the past decade. It includes new topics such as bacterial, fungal, parasitic and viral foodborne diseases; chemical toxicants; risk-based control measures; virulence factors of microbial pathogens that cause disease; epigenetics and foodborne pathogens; nanotechnology; bioterrorism and the use of foodborne pathogens; antimicrobial resistance; and antibiotic resistance. Learn more about disease processes in foodborne illness in this sample chapter. Dr. Dodd is the department chair of Food Science in the School of Biosciences at the University of Nottingham, UK. She is an expert in applied microbiology, cross-contamination and enteric viruses. Dr. Dodd has published more than 100 articles and has been an invited speaker at more than 40 conferences. Dr. Aldsworth is senior lecturer in Biotechnology in the Department of Applied Sciences and Health at Coventry University in Priory, UK. His research expertise is in microbiological analysis of food, food safety, pathogen epidemiology and microbial resistance. Dr. Stein is a research scientist in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at New York University in New York City, USA. He has expertise in biochemistry and molecular genetics. Dr. Stein is Associate Editor for "Infectious Diseases" as well as an editorial board member of nine journals and a highly respected speaker. The five new food science titles are: In order to meet content needs in food science, Elsevier uses proprietary tools to identify the gaps in coverage of the topics. Editorial teams strategically fill those gaps with content written by key influencers in the field, giving students, faculty and researchers the content they need to answer challenging questions and improve outcomes. These new books, which will educate the next generation of food scientists, and provide critical foundational content for information professionals, are key examples of how Elsevier is enabling science to drive innovation. Note for Editors E-book review copies of the new books are available to credentialed journalists upon request. Contact Jelena Baras at sciencereviewcopies@elsevier.com. About Elsevier Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions -- among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Research Intelligence and ClinicalKey -- and publishes over 2,500 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and more than 35,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a world-leading provider of information and analytics for professional and business customers across industries. www.elsevier.com


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Vegesentials, the multiple international award-winning high-pressure pasteurized cold-pressed fruit and vegetable drink brand is now available on Amazon.com. In 2016, the London-based Vegesentials Ltd. partnered with Michigan-based Vegesentials USA, LLC to manufacture and distribute the Vegesentials line of juices throughout North America. Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (“RDN”) Nanette Cameron has been working with Vegesentials to improve their cold-pressed juices for children and young adults. Commenting on the ingredients of Vegesentials offerings, Cameron notes the added fiber “promotes blood sugar stabilization, but what it means is energy balance to improve a child’s focus and mood; something that is so important for learning and academics.” She continues that “digestive health refers to keeping healthy floral in the stomach, this decreases stomach pain, constipation, diarrhea, another common issue among children and many young adults.” Studying the various Vegesentials recipes and contents, Cameron commented, “What I like about these juices is the cold pressurized process. The nutrients from the fruit and vegetables are maintained; this is something that is not listed on a nutritional label. Consuming anti-oxidants and phyto-chemicals have been linked to a healthy immune system and prevention of disease.” The Vegesentials labels are “clean, and that’s what we advise our constituents to be on the look-out for: ‘clean labeling.’” As part of the required North American validation of the juice contents, Vegesentials retained the Department of Food Science at the University of Guelph (Ontario, CA) to certify its HPP process and juice ingredients. According to Dr. Keith Warriner, the aim of the validations is “to determine the efficacy of different HHP treatments to reduce model pathogens introduced into high acid juices.” Because HPP technology is relatively new and fresh juice has become so popular, Dr. Warriner will continue his academic research with Vegesentials to improve food safety for consumers. “The results [of our testing] indicate that juice formulation has a role in defining the pressure resistance of pathogens although which constituents provide protection to HHP remain unclear.” "Our biggest concern as a company is customer health," said Daniel Hoops, Vegesentials USA co-founder. "When you look at the vast array of cold-pressed juices sold on the Internet, few use the HPP technology. In addition to our juices having longer shelf life, we know that there is little to no risk of salmonella, ecoli, and other food-borne bacteria because we use HPP." Vegesentials is the United Kingdom’s first cold pressed vegetable and fruit drink brand. Following its launch in June 2012, Vegesentials can now be found in all but one WholeFoods in the U.K., 60% of the Waitrose supermarkets, and 50% of the Holland and Barrett outlets. Vegesentials has received numerous awards and recognition since its initial launch, including 2 Gold Stars awards for Superior Taste from the International Taste & Quality Institute, Winner of ‘the Health & Fitness Food and Drink ‘Smoothie Category 2014 Award’ by Women’s Fitness and Health & Fitness Magazines, Gold in the low calorie food and drink category by Women’s Fitness and Health & Fitness 2016, Voted as No.1 ‘Highly Recommended’ Drink at Be:Fit London Show 2014 by ‘Science of Fit’, Winner of 'Best Exhibitor Award 2014’ at The Food & Drink Expo Trade Show NEC Birmingham, UK’s largest ‘Food & Drink’ trade show in 2014, and Finalist for Grocer Gold Award for “Entrepreneur of 2014.” “We thought the American consumer might be a little hesitant to try a ‘foreign’ fruit and vegetable juice, but all of the feedback from our testing groups have come back with high marks. It’s been incredible and we’re honored to be the exclusive distributor here in North America.” Cameron said “I was genuinely shocked to hear my 16-year old nephew (who despises carrots) tell me that the Cheeky Carrot juice was ‘the best juice I have ever tasted!’ That was all the validation I needed.” Vegesentials USA will offer Amazon.com customers the Vegesentials 8.8oz Cheeky Carrot (carrot, apple, orange, lime, and chicory root), Cool Cucumber (cucumber, apple, spinach and chicory root), and Groovy Beet (beetroot, apple, cucumber, strawberry and chicory root). The child and senior version of these juices, sold in a 4.4oz bottle, will be available on Amazon.com at a later date. For more information about Vegesentials, visit http://www.vegesentials.co.uk or http://www.vegesentialsusa.com.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: phys.org

In cooperation with the Danish dairy company, Arla, PhD student Ida Sørensen and Associate Professor Lars Wiking from Department of Food Science at Aarhus University have examined how milk quality is affected when concentrating the milk is carried out on-farm. "Even though the reverse osmosis technique is widely used, we only have limited documentation of how it affects milk quality. Milk is a rather delicate raw material so it is important to identify how key quality parameters such as protein breakdown and level of free fatty acids (FFA) and total bacterial count are affected. These parameters are important to the taste, smell and look of the final product." "It is important that on-farm concentration does not deteriorate the quality. Normally, it is not a problem that the fat globules in the milk are damaged in the process at the dairy, as the milk is subsequently pasteurized. However, when carrying out milk concentration at the farm, the milk is left unpasteurized and all the enzymes and micro-organisms are still there and therefore the milk is more delicate, Ida Sørensen explains." The researchers at Aarhus University have analyzed experiments with both the so-called ultrafiltration, which is supposed be more gentle to the milk, and with the reverse osmosis technique, which requires a higher pressure on the milk but also retains the lactose which may be an advantage in for example milk powder. Neither the total bacterial count, or the FFA-levels nor the protein breakdown were negatively affected by reverse osmosis; the concentrated milk could very well be used for both cheese and milk powder. Analyses also demonstrate that the quality and durability of milk powder made from concentrated milk is the same as for powder made from ordinary milk; in cheese, however, there is a minor difference as to how the enzymes react; and in the experiments, concentrated milk coagulated approximately ten minutes later than regular milk. "My theory is that it is more difficult for the enzymes to 'get through', Ida Sørensen says and explains that concentrated milk is thicker—more like coffee cream—and this might explain why coagulation takes a little longer." Concentration of milk on the farm, or during transport from farm to dairy, is carried out in many other countries in the world, e.g. in Texas, USA, where both herds and distances are huge. Different models exist as to how on-farm milk concentration may become a reality. The farmer may buy the filtration equipment himself and achieve an additional price for the milk. Or perhaps the dairy could buy, maintain and service the filtration installation or it could be acquired through some kind of leasing agreement. Herd size and distance to the dairy in particular, are of major importance when considering resources and profitability, as small installations typically use more power than one large installation, says Ida Sørensen; she has just presented the results of the studies at a major conference in Dublin. "While farmers have shown significant interest in the idea, the dairies seem more skeptical; especially in relation to finances as well as the handling of this new type of milk. Arla is currently making calculations in relation to the profitability of this project, as energy consumption and investments should be balanced in proportion to cost savings." Explore further: New review article suggests sheep milk may be the next functional dairy food More information: Ida Sørensen et al, Storage stability of whole milk powder produced from raw milk reverse osmosis retentate, Dairy Science & Technology (2016). DOI: 10.1007/s13594-016-0309-y

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