Food Safety and Inspection Service

Omaha, NE, United States

Food Safety and Inspection Service

Omaha, NE, United States

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News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.foodprocessing-technology.com

Green Chile Food to recall 252,854lb of meat and poultry burrito products US-based Green Chile Food is set to recall about 252,854lb of ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and poultry frozen burrito products due to possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination. The information was confirmed by the US Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). Green Chile produced the RTE products at its Las Cruces manufacturing facility in New Mexico, as well as packaged them on various dates between 8 March and 10 May. The issue was identified by the FSIS inspection programme personnel (IPP) during a routine Listeria monocytogenes product sample of beef and potato burrito. The products that are subject to recall bear establishment number ‘M-21740 or P-21740’ inside the USDA mark of inspection and were shipped to institutions, retail stores and distribution centres in California, Illinois, Oregon and South Dakota. "Green Chile produced the RTE products at its Las Cruces manufacturing facility in New Mexico, as well as packaged them on various dates between 8 March and 10 May." The company said it has not received any confirmed reports of illness due to consumption of these products, which could lead to serious infection in older adults, people with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Listeriosis can also cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, or other gastrointestinal symptoms. Green Chile Food urged consumers who have purchased these products not to consume them, and return to the place of purchase.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.undercurrentnews.com

The US federal government is planning to adjust its inspection coverage of catfish at official fish slaughter establishments to once per production shift, from all hours of the day. This decision is based on the inspection experience of the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), under the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), according to a notice in the US Federal Register. This is expected to take effect Sept. 1 of this year, but it remains subject to public comments through June 16. The FSIS has determined that this change "will enable [the FSIS] to provide adequate inspection coverage to fulfill the FMIA [Federal Meat Inspection Act] mandate and allow it to most efficiently equip its workforce with the resources and tools they need to protect public health." This comes after the 2008 and 2014 Farm Bills placed the authority of catfish inspection with the USDA's FSIS, under Section 606 of the FMIA, called "inspecting and labeling of meat food products". There are now 16 official fish slaughter establishments receiving inspection during all hours of operation. All of them receive live fish that are subsequently slaughtered and further processed. The FSIS definition of slaughter, with respect to fish, is the "intentional killing under control conditions".


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.foodprocessing-technology.com

John Morrell and Co recalls ready-to-eat hot dog products in US over contamination concerns US-based John Morrell and Co has recalled 210,606lb of ready-to-eat hot dog products over concerns that they may be tainted with extraneous materials, particularly metal. According to the US Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) statement, the beef franks items were produced on 26 January. "The contamination issue was discovered following three complaints of metal objects in the beef frank products." The products being recalled include 14oz sealed film packages containing 'Nathan’s Skinless 8 Beef Franks' with a use-by date of 19 August, and 16oz sealed film packages containing 'Curtis Beef Master Beef Franks', with a use-by date of 15 June. These products bear establishment number 'EST. 296' on the cover. The items were shipped to retail outlets across the country. The contamination issue was discovered following three complaints over finding metal objects in the beef frank products. John Morrell and Co notified FSIS on 19 May. The company so far has not received any reports of adverse reactions or injury due to consumption. John Morrell and Co has urged customers who have bought these products not to consume them and either return them to the place of purchase or throw them away. This recall is considered to be Class II, which indicates that there is a health hazard situation where there is a chance of adverse health risks due to product consumption.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.foodprocessing-technology.com

Kansas-based Armour Eckrich Meats has recalled 90,978lb of ready-to-eat sausage products as they may be contaminated with pieces of metal, according to the US Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). The issue was identified on 15 May when Armour Eckrich Meats was informed by another FSIS-regulated establishment that pieces of metal were found in the fully cooked sausage products. "The products that have been recalled bear establishment number ‘EST. 3JC’ inside the USDA mark of inspection." Armour Eckrich Meats noted that its cooked pork, turkey and beef breakfast sausage items were produced and packaged from 26 April to 28 April this year, and were shipped to various distribution centres in Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas. The products that have been recalled bear establishment number ‘EST. 3JC’ inside the USDA mark of inspection. The company further added that it has not received any confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products, and urged customers not to consume them and either throw away or return the products to the place of purchase. FSIS continuously conducts routine checks to verify that firms notify their customers of the recall and steps are taken to ensure the product is no longer available for purchase.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.foodprocessing-technology.com

Foster Farms has recalled nearly 131,880lb of frozen, ready-to-eat breaded chicken patty products over contamination. According to the US Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), the products have been contaminated with foreign materials, which are said to have originated from the company’s packaging. The packages with the affected Frozen Cooked Breaded Chicken Breast Patties with Rib Meat were produced on 15 February and carry a best-by date of 15 February 2018. "The issue was discovered by the company through consumer product feedback." The products in 5lb resealable club-size bags have been distributed to certain Costco depots in Alaska, Arizona, California, Utah and Washington in the US. Foster Farms said that the recall is limited to 3,297 cases that were distributed to certain Costco depots. No other retailers are involved. The issue was discovered by the company through consumer product feedback. Foster Farms identified the issue and said that the problem was with a specific production line on a certain date at the Farmerville facility. Until now, the company has not received reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of affected products. The company has urged people not to consume the recalled chicken patties and advised them to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.foodprocessing-technology.com

US-based foodservice company Blount Fine Foods has recalled nearly 8,685lb of Beef Chile Colorado frozen meals over misbranding and an undeclared allergen. According to the US Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), recalled products have been mislabeled as Beef Chile Colorado, but the packaged product contains cheese enchiladas with milk as an ingredient. Milk is a known allergen and was not mentioned on the product label. The issue came to the notice of the company after it received a complaint from one of the customers who purchased this product. The recalled products were produced on 23 November last year. They include 10oz retail cartons containing ‘saffron road beef Chile Colorado with mesquite black beans and garlic rice’ with ‘best by’ dates of 05/23/2018 AP. The recalled items were shipped to distribution centres in Pennsylvania and Texas. "The issue came to the notice of the company after it received a complaint from one of the customers who purchased this product." The products subject to recall do not bear an establishment number on the packaging. Blount Fine Foods said it has not received any confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products, and urged consumers not to consume them.


Another distributor of pre-packaged fresh food item issues a recall due to possible contamination in its products. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced a Class I recall — a health hazard that could cause serious adverse health consequences — for several meat products that tested positive for the presence of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli. The recall was issued for more than 5,600 pounds of pre-packaged boneless veal; veal trimmings; and beef, pork, and veal ground for meatloaf that were delivered to retail and food service outlets in Illinois, New York, North and South Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. The E.coli contamination was discovered by the Illinois State Meat Inspection Service after testing samples made with meat sourced from Souderton-based Marcho Farms. The agency quickly reported their findings to USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). USDA and Marcho Farms quickly issued the recall and urged people not to consume the affected meat products. The contaminated products are listed below: Consumers may also view the package label [PDF] for comparison if they recently bought a Marcho Farms product. As mentioned earlier, the USDA classifies the Marcho Farms recall under Class I since an E. coli contamination is highly dangerous and is potentially deadly when ingested, especially in children. E. coli can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhea, and abdominal cramps for about seven days (three to four days on average). These symptoms are recoverable but can also lead to kidney failure in young children and older adults, especially those with weaker immune systems. The USDA says that Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) outbreaks are rare but since food contamination is one of the dangerous bacterium's more common modes of transmission, it is best to avoid consumption of potentially contaminated products. It is also advised to seek emergency medical assistance when symptoms occur. USDA and the company note that there have been no reports of illnesses caused by the recalled meat products but both are still concerned because some consumers may still be keeping the contaminated items in their freezers. The USDA advises that raw meat should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160°F to kill bacteria and make it safe for consumption. It is also advised to use a food thermometer to accurately measure the internal temperature of the meat. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Oklahoma-based OK Food, Inc., which produces ready-to-eat-chicken including Wal-Mart's Great Value brand, issued a recall of nearly 1 million pounds of its breaded chicken following reports from consumers of metal objects found inside the meat. Inspection at the processing plant revealed that the objects were from a metal conveyor belting. No case of injury or illness from eating the product has been reported so far but five customers have filed complaints. "The problem was discovered on March 21, 2017 after OK Foods Inc. received five consumer complaints stating that metal objects were found in the ready-to-eat chicken products and by FSIS inspection personnel during verification activities," the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) said in a statement. It isn't the first time that a foreign object has been found inside food. Several food companies have also issued recalls because of potentially dangerous foreign objects that are in (or possibly got into) their food products. Glass fragments appear to commonly contaminate and pose potential safety concerns for packaged food and beverage products. In January this year, for instance, glass hazards prompted one of the largest craft brewers in the   United States to issue a recall of some of its bottled beer. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., recalled the products as a precautionary measure because the packaging flaw can potentially cause injury to its consumers. In April last year, the Food and Drug Administration warned consumers that there may be shards of glass in 8-ounce jars of All Nice! sliced peaches and mixed fruits that were distributed at Walgreens store. The contaminants could cut or injure consumers if ingested. Sweet Leaf Tea Company also recalled bottles of tea products in 2015 over concerns that a glass breakage incident that occurred during a filling process may have entered some of the bottled products. In November 2015, Campbell Soup Company also recalled some of its SpaghettiOs Original cans because the affected products have tiny red plastic pieces inside it. The plastic pieces came from some parts of the can's lining. A month prior to Campbell's recall, Hormel Foods also announced removing some of its Skippy peanut butter from store shelves because of the possibility that some jars have small metal shavings that were detected through a magnet check during routine cleaning. Huisken Meat Company also recalled some of its Sam's Choice Black Angus Vidalia Onion items over concerns that they have wood materials that came from an ingredient and was found during production. Between 1972 and 1997, the Health Hazard Evaluation Board of the FDA evaluated about 190 cases of sharp or hard foreign objects in food. While these objects pose risks, certain objects rarely cause serious damage. "The Board found that foreign objects that are less than 7 mm, maximum dimension, rarely cause trauma or serious injury except in special risk groups such as infants, surgery patients, and the elderly," the FDA said. "Hard or sharp natural components of a food ( e.g. bones in seafood, shell in nut products) are unlikely to cause injury." © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


REDONDO BEACH, CA / ACCESSWIRE / December 13, 2016 / BioLargo, Inc. (OTCQB: BLGO), owner and developer of the breakthrough AOS (Advanced Oxidation System), a low-energy high-efficiency clean water technology, announced the start of a relationship with Chicago Bridge & Iron, NV (NYSE: CBI). According to the press release and a number of recent interviews with BioLargo's President & CEO, Dennis P. Calvert, the new relationship was formed to support the commercialization of BioLargo's proprietary technology and to provide independent performance verification. BioLargo also reports the AOS has been proven to disinfect and decontaminate water better, faster and at a lower cost than any other competing technology. Based on the breadth and significance of the technical performance claims for its AOS, BioLargo has a broad range of commercial opportunities for large industrial applications that must contend with water such as: maritime ballast water management systems, wastewater treatment, environmental remediation, food safety, oil & gas, mining, and agriculture. Its future uses also promise to impact the drinking water industry, including municipal, home use, and emerging nations. The company is also busy commercializing its new "CupriDyne Clean", an industrial odor control product launched last May. The company reports that the product is so effective and low-cost it is gaining rapid traction through trials with leaders within the waste handling industry and that it has had some early sales. Management believes sales will continue to climb, as they finalize supplier agreements with large multi-location customer accounts. CupriDyne Clean may also have an important role to play in industries that contend with volatile organic compounds like hydrogen sulfide (H2S) that impact air quality and safety. Dennis P. Calvert, President & CEO of BioLargo commented, "All of our technologies at BioLargo can serve a wide array of industrial customers that want clean water and clean air. Our mission to 'Make Life Better' includes helping industry tackle operational challenges cost effectively. That intersection of service is likely where our new relationship with CB&I will shine the brightest and we look forward to working with the exceptional team at CB&I to serve industry." With more than 40,000 employees, $13 billion in annual revenue and over $20 billion in future contracts, CB&I is a world-leading engineering, procurement, fabrication, and construction company, and a provider of environmental and infrastructure services. CB&I builds oil refineries, liquefied natural gas terminals, wastewater treatment plants, offshore platforms, and power plants. CB&I is also the world's largest tank construction company and builds tanks for the oil & gas, mining, water, and wastewater industries. The company also remediates hazardous waste problems. Clean water and clean air are at the heart of many of industries served by CB&I and BioLargo's technologies. Details in the first announcement were slim. This news sends notice to the investment world and to industry that Biolargo's technologies can have an important role to play in helping solve air and water contamination problems in a safe, effective and affordable way. Calvert has been quick to point out that the current version of the AOS has been engineered to serve entry-level clients and that important scale-up work is required to serve very large-scale industrial clients. BioLargo Water's research team recently showcased the first pre-commercial prototype of its AOS water treatment system, billed as the lowest cost and highest impact, scalable clean water technology in the world. By combining a cutting-edge carbon matrix, advanced iodine chemistry, and electrolysis, this technology rapidly and inexpensively eliminates bacteria and chemical contaminants in water without leaving residual toxins. University of Alberta researchers, in collaboration with BioLargo Water Scientists, have confirmed test results that validate the AOS achieves unprecedented rates of disinfection, eliminating infectious biological pathogens such as Salmonella, Listeria and E. coli. The AOS has also been proven effective in oxidizing and removing hard-to-manage soluble organics acids, aromatic compounds, and solvents faster than existing technologies and with very little input energy. Proven test results validate its important role for extremely high oxidation potential to tackle a long "watch list" of contaminants identified by the EPA. The company reports that future generations of the AOS will include the extraction and harvesting of important contaminants like sulfur, nitrates, phosphorus, and even heavy metals. The company's first "Alpha" AOS was constructed in collaboration with the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT)'s Center for Sensors and Systems Integration and with NAIT's Applied Bio/Nanotechnology Industrial Research Chair. Its "Beta" unit is expected to be ready for commercial trials in 2017. What places the AOS above competing technologies is its exceptionally high rate of disinfection (100x more effective than the competition, as verified in poultry production applications) and remarkably low capital and operational costs, made possible by its extremely low amount of electrical energy required to power the oxidation process. Studies have shown the AOS to achieve remarkable rates of disinfection at less than 1/20th the electrical energy input of competing technologies. The AOS is scalable and modular in design to meet a wide variety of needs in the marketplace. BioLargo is already working on what it calls the "Gen 2 AOS" for ultra-high flow rates. Because the markets for the AOS are very large and the needs so great, management reports that they believe it is only a matter of time before industry adopts this new breakthrough low cost technology. Oil and gas companies such as Exxon Mobil Corporation (NYSE: XOM), Halliburton Company (NYSE: HAL), Schlumberger Limited (NYSE: SLB), Chevron Corporation (NYSE: CVX) and Royal Dutch Shell plc (NYSE: RDS-A) could dramatically reduce water transportation, sourcing and disposal costs by adopting the AOS. The AOS has been shown to be cost effective at removing problematic contaminants from oil & gas "produced water", and any technology such as the AOS that could cost-effectively enable water recycling on-site could slash costs and greatly improve the bottom line for many producers that are now suffering big losses due to persistently low oil prices. It could also alleviate the costly problem of injecting produced water deep into injection wells, and simultaneously reduce pollution. The maritime industry has increasing regulatory pressure to eliminate the detrimental transfer and release of invasive marine species through the discharge of ballast water. This issue prompted the International Maritime Organization to impose regulations for the treatment and discharge of ballast water, and these new rules are scheduled to come into force beginning September of 2017. An estimated 65,000 ships must adopt ballast water treatment systems type approved under the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004 (BWMC). Approved systems must disinfect seawater to specified standards without adding any toxic elements to the discharged water. Global Water Intelligence estimates that the average cost for each ballast water management system will be more than $750,000 and the total cost to outfit every vessel will be about $46.5 billion. Because it is the highest impact, lowest cost, lowest energy technology known that can solve this problem, the AOS is could be the most practical solution to maritime operators such as DryShips, Inc. (NASDAQ: DRYS), Navios Maritime Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ: NM), Diana Shipping, Inc. (NYSE: DSX), Sino-Global Shipping America, Ltd. (NASDAQ: SINO), Diana Containerships Inc. (DCIX) and several others. In an effort to reduce the incidence of foodborne illness in the poultry industry, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service, FSIS, announced new, stricter federal standards to reduce Salmonella and Campylobacter in ground chicken and turkey products, as well as in raw chicken breasts, legs, and wings. The new regulations took effect July 1, 2016 and have the potential to impact sales of poultry processing operations of Tyson Foods, Inc. (NYSE: TSN), Pilgrims Pride Corporation, (NASDAQ: PPC), Sanderson Farms, Inc., (NASDAQ: SAFM), Hormel Foods Corporation, (NYSE: HRL), Perdue, Cargill, Smithfield Food, Inc., Conagra Foods, Inc., and every other poultry processor. Researchers at the University of Alberta confirmed that the AOS could be highly effective in reducing cross-contamination of pathogens when poultry is washed in chill tanks. Water quality of municipal water systems is also a growing concern and a few large water treatment companies that provide water services to millions of U.S. residents are American Water Works Company, Inc., (NYSE: AWK), American States Water Company (NYSE: AWR), Aqua America, Inc. (NYSE: WTR) and Veolia Environnement S.A. (OTC: VEOEY). The need for a better and lower cost clean water technology is urgent and CB&I may just be the perfect company to support implementation of breakthrough low-cost water and air treatment technologies developed by BioLargo, Inc. that can help solve problems across such a broad spectrum of industries. Except for the historical information presented herein, matters discussed in this release contain forward-looking statements that are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such statements. Emerging Growth LLC, which owns SECFilings.com, is not registered with any financial or securities regulatory authority, and does not provide nor claims to provide investment advice or recommendations to readers of this release. Emerging Growth LLC may from time to time have a position in the securities mentioned herein and may increase or decrease such positions without notice. For making specific investment decisions, readers should seek their own advice. Emerging Growth LLC may be compensated for its services in the form of cash-based compensation or equity securities in the companies it writes about, or a combination of the two. For full disclosure please visit: http://secfilings.com/Disclaimer.aspx. REDONDO BEACH, CA / ACCESSWIRE / December 13, 2016 / BioLargo, Inc. (OTCQB: BLGO), owner and developer of the breakthrough AOS (Advanced Oxidation System), a low-energy high-efficiency clean water technology, announced the start of a relationship with Chicago Bridge & Iron, NV (NYSE: CBI). According to the press release and a number of recent interviews with BioLargo's President & CEO, Dennis P. Calvert, the new relationship was formed to support the commercialization of BioLargo's proprietary technology and to provide independent performance verification. BioLargo also reports the AOS has been proven to disinfect and decontaminate water better, faster and at a lower cost than any other competing technology. Based on the breadth and significance of the technical performance claims for its AOS, BioLargo has a broad range of commercial opportunities for large industrial applications that must contend with water such as: maritime ballast water management systems, wastewater treatment, environmental remediation, food safety, oil & gas, mining, and agriculture. Its future uses also promise to impact the drinking water industry, including municipal, home use, and emerging nations. The company is also busy commercializing its new "CupriDyne Clean", an industrial odor control product launched last May. The company reports that the product is so effective and low-cost it is gaining rapid traction through trials with leaders within the waste handling industry and that it has had some early sales. Management believes sales will continue to climb, as they finalize supplier agreements with large multi-location customer accounts. CupriDyne Clean may also have an important role to play in industries that contend with volatile organic compounds like hydrogen sulfide (H2S) that impact air quality and safety. Dennis P. Calvert, President & CEO of BioLargo commented, "All of our technologies at BioLargo can serve a wide array of industrial customers that want clean water and clean air. Our mission to 'Make Life Better' includes helping industry tackle operational challenges cost effectively. That intersection of service is likely where our new relationship with CB&I will shine the brightest and we look forward to working with the exceptional team at CB&I to serve industry." With more than 40,000 employees, $13 billion in annual revenue and over $20 billion in future contracts, CB&I is a world-leading engineering, procurement, fabrication, and construction company, and a provider of environmental and infrastructure services. CB&I builds oil refineries, liquefied natural gas terminals, wastewater treatment plants, offshore platforms, and power plants. CB&I is also the world's largest tank construction company and builds tanks for the oil & gas, mining, water, and wastewater industries. The company also remediates hazardous waste problems. Clean water and clean air are at the heart of many of industries served by CB&I and BioLargo's technologies. Details in the first announcement were slim. This news sends notice to the investment world and to industry that Biolargo's technologies can have an important role to play in helping solve air and water contamination problems in a safe, effective and affordable way. Calvert has been quick to point out that the current version of the AOS has been engineered to serve entry-level clients and that important scale-up work is required to serve very large-scale industrial clients. BioLargo Water's research team recently showcased the first pre-commercial prototype of its AOS water treatment system, billed as the lowest cost and highest impact, scalable clean water technology in the world. By combining a cutting-edge carbon matrix, advanced iodine chemistry, and electrolysis, this technology rapidly and inexpensively eliminates bacteria and chemical contaminants in water without leaving residual toxins. University of Alberta researchers, in collaboration with BioLargo Water Scientists, have confirmed test results that validate the AOS achieves unprecedented rates of disinfection, eliminating infectious biological pathogens such as Salmonella, Listeria and E. coli. The AOS has also been proven effective in oxidizing and removing hard-to-manage soluble organics acids, aromatic compounds, and solvents faster than existing technologies and with very little input energy. Proven test results validate its important role for extremely high oxidation potential to tackle a long "watch list" of contaminants identified by the EPA. The company reports that future generations of the AOS will include the extraction and harvesting of important contaminants like sulfur, nitrates, phosphorus, and even heavy metals. The company's first "Alpha" AOS was constructed in collaboration with the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT)'s Center for Sensors and Systems Integration and with NAIT's Applied Bio/Nanotechnology Industrial Research Chair. Its "Beta" unit is expected to be ready for commercial trials in 2017. What places the AOS above competing technologies is its exceptionally high rate of disinfection (100x more effective than the competition, as verified in poultry production applications) and remarkably low capital and operational costs, made possible by its extremely low amount of electrical energy required to power the oxidation process. Studies have shown the AOS to achieve remarkable rates of disinfection at less than 1/20th the electrical energy input of competing technologies. The AOS is scalable and modular in design to meet a wide variety of needs in the marketplace. BioLargo is already working on what it calls the "Gen 2 AOS" for ultra-high flow rates. Because the markets for the AOS are very large and the needs so great, management reports that they believe it is only a matter of time before industry adopts this new breakthrough low cost technology. Oil and gas companies such as Exxon Mobil Corporation (NYSE: XOM), Halliburton Company (NYSE: HAL), Schlumberger Limited (NYSE: SLB), Chevron Corporation (NYSE: CVX) and Royal Dutch Shell plc (NYSE: RDS-A) could dramatically reduce water transportation, sourcing and disposal costs by adopting the AOS. The AOS has been shown to be cost effective at removing problematic contaminants from oil & gas "produced water", and any technology such as the AOS that could cost-effectively enable water recycling on-site could slash costs and greatly improve the bottom line for many producers that are now suffering big losses due to persistently low oil prices. It could also alleviate the costly problem of injecting produced water deep into injection wells, and simultaneously reduce pollution. The maritime industry has increasing regulatory pressure to eliminate the detrimental transfer and release of invasive marine species through the discharge of ballast water. This issue prompted the International Maritime Organization to impose regulations for the treatment and discharge of ballast water, and these new rules are scheduled to come into force beginning September of 2017. An estimated 65,000 ships must adopt ballast water treatment systems type approved under the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004 (BWMC). Approved systems must disinfect seawater to specified standards without adding any toxic elements to the discharged water. Global Water Intelligence estimates that the average cost for each ballast water management system will be more than $750,000 and the total cost to outfit every vessel will be about $46.5 billion. Because it is the highest impact, lowest cost, lowest energy technology known that can solve this problem, the AOS is could be the most practical solution to maritime operators such as DryShips, Inc. (NASDAQ: DRYS), Navios Maritime Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ: NM), Diana Shipping, Inc. (NYSE: DSX), Sino-Global Shipping America, Ltd. (NASDAQ: SINO), Diana Containerships Inc. (DCIX) and several others. In an effort to reduce the incidence of foodborne illness in the poultry industry, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service, FSIS, announced new, stricter federal standards to reduce Salmonella and Campylobacter in ground chicken and turkey products, as well as in raw chicken breasts, legs, and wings. The new regulations took effect July 1, 2016 and have the potential to impact sales of poultry processing operations of Tyson Foods, Inc. (NYSE: TSN), Pilgrims Pride Corporation, (NASDAQ: PPC), Sanderson Farms, Inc., (NASDAQ: SAFM), Hormel Foods Corporation, (NYSE: HRL), Perdue, Cargill, Smithfield Food, Inc., Conagra Foods, Inc., and every other poultry processor. Researchers at the University of Alberta confirmed that the AOS could be highly effective in reducing cross-contamination of pathogens when poultry is washed in chill tanks. Water quality of municipal water systems is also a growing concern and a few large water treatment companies that provide water services to millions of U.S. residents are American Water Works Company, Inc., (NYSE: AWK), American States Water Company (NYSE: AWR), Aqua America, Inc. (NYSE: WTR) and Veolia Environnement S.A. (OTC: VEOEY). The need for a better and lower cost clean water technology is urgent and CB&I may just be the perfect company to support implementation of breakthrough low-cost water and air treatment technologies developed by BioLargo, Inc. that can help solve problems across such a broad spectrum of industries. Except for the historical information presented herein, matters discussed in this release contain forward-looking statements that are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such statements. Emerging Growth LLC, which owns SECFilings.com, is not registered with any financial or securities regulatory authority, and does not provide nor claims to provide investment advice or recommendations to readers of this release. Emerging Growth LLC may from time to time have a position in the securities mentioned herein and may increase or decrease such positions without notice. For making specific investment decisions, readers should seek their own advice. Emerging Growth LLC may be compensated for its services in the form of cash-based compensation or equity securities in the companies it writes about, or a combination of the two. For full disclosure please visit: http://secfilings.com/Disclaimer.aspx.


The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service has issued an alert on possible salmonella contamination in a chicken salad sold at Costco Store No. 1190, located in Lynnwood in the state of Washington. The chicken salad products included in the public health alert are those produced between Aug. 26 and Sept. 2. The product that comes with the name "Costco Rotisserie Chicken Salad" is sold directly to customers that visit the Costco Store in Lynnwood. The chicken salad produced during the said date is available in varying weights. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is said to have called FSIS's attention on illness linked to salmonella infection in Washington on Sept. 26. The FSIS, along with the Washington State Department of Health and the CDC, found that the rotisserie chicken salad sold in the specified store could be causing the illness. The federal services that investigated the issue identified four cases linked to salmonella outbreak in the region between Sept. 4 and Sept. 6 with the help of epidemiological evidence. It was revealed on further investigation that three patients consumed the rotisserie chicken salad bought from the said Costco outlet on Aug. 26, Aug. 31 and Sept. 2. However, none of the suspected products tested positive for the particular strain of salmonella associated with the infection. When clinical isolates were subjected to an antibiotic resistance test, three were found to be resistant to only one of the antibiotics used in the treatment of salmonellosis, which was tetracycline. The agencies are, however, working in full swing on the issue in order to contain a possible salmonella outbreak in the locality. Salmonellosis is a food-borne infection caused by salmonella, marked by symptoms including abdominal cramps, diarrhea and fever experienced within 12 to 72 hours of consumption of contaminated food. People suffering salmonellosis usually recover within four to seven days of illness. Meanwhile, people that bought the chicken salad on Aug. 26, Aug. 31 and Sept. 2 are warned not to eat it and are also asked to either dispose or return the product to the place of purchase. "FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume rotisserie chicken that has been cooked to a temperature of 165° F," reads the public health alert. To know whether rotisserie chicken is cooked thoroughly at the said temperature, people are advised to make use of a food thermometer that is capable of measuring the internal temperature accurately. People are also recommended to wash their hands for 20 seconds prior to and after handling raw meat products and poultry. Using separate chopping boards for cutting meat and vegetables is also recommended. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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