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Gould L.H.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Mody R.K.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Ong K.L.,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | Clogher P.,Connecticut Emerging Infections Program | And 8 more authors.
Foodborne Pathogens and Disease | Year: 2013

Background: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are an important cause of diarrhea and the major cause of postdiarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome. Non-O157 STEC infections are being recognized with greater frequency because of changing laboratory practices. Methods: Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) site staff conducted active, population-based surveillance for laboratory-confirmed STEC infections. We assessed frequency and incidence of STEC infections by serogroup and examined and compared demographic factors, clinical characteristics, and frequency of international travel among patients. Results: During 2000-2010, FoodNet sites reported 2006 cases of non-O157 STEC infection and 5688 cases of O157 STEC infections. The number of reported non-O157 STEC infections increased from an incidence of 0.12 per 100,000 population in 2000 to 0.95 per 100,000 in 2010; while the rate of O157 STEC infections decreased from 2.17 to 0.95 per 100,000. Among non-O157 STEC, six serogroups were most commonly reported: O26 (26%), O103 (22%), O111 (19%), O121 (6%), O45 (5%), and O145 (4%). Non-O157 STEC infections were more common among Hispanics, and infections were less severe than those caused by O157 STEC, but this varied by serogroup. Fewer non-O157 STEC infections were associated with outbreaks (7% versus 20% for O157), while more were associated with international travel (14% versus 3% for O157). Conclusions: Improved understanding of the epidemiologic features of non-O157 STEC infections can inform food safety and other prevention efforts. To detect both O157 and non-O157 STEC infections, clinical laboratories should routinely and simultaneously test all stool specimens submitted for diagnosis of acute community-acquired diarrhea for O157 STEC and for Shiga toxin and ensure that isolates are sent to a public health laboratory for serotyping and subtyping. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Zablotsky Kufel J.S.,Food Safety and Inspection Service
American Journal of Public Health | Year: 2011

Objectives: We evaluated the relationship between local food protection capacity and service provision in Maryland's 24 local food protection programs (FPPs) and incidence of foodborne illness at the county level. Methods: We conducted regression analyses to determine the relationship between foodborne illness and local FPP characteristics. We used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's FoodNet and Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene outbreak data set, along with data on Maryland's local FPP capacity (workforce size and experience levels, budget) and service provision (food service facility inspections, public notification programs). Results: Countieswith higher capacity, such as larger workforce, higher budget, and greater employee experience, had fewer foodborne illnesses. Counties with better performance and county-level regulations, such as high food service facility inspection rates and requiring certified foodmanager programs, respectively, had lower rates of illness. Conclusions: Counties with strong local food protection capacity and services can protect the public from foodborne illness. Research on public health services can enhance our understanding of the food protection infrastructure, and the effectiveness of food protection programs in preventing foodborne illness.


Guo C.,Food Safety and Inspection Service | Hoekstra R.M.,National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases | Schroeder C.M.,Food Safety and Inspection Service | Pires S.M.,Technical University of Denmark | And 12 more authors.
Foodborne Pathogens and Disease | Year: 2011

Mathematical models that estimate the proportion of foodborne illnesses attributable to food commodities at specific points in the food chain may be useful to risk managers and policy makers to formulate public health goals, prioritize interventions, and document the effectiveness of mitigations aimed at reducing illness. Using human surveillance data on laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Salmonella testing data from U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service's regulatory programs, we developed a point-of-processing foodborne illness attribution model by adapting the Hald Salmonella Bayesian source attribution model. Key model outputs include estimates of the relative proportions of domestically acquired sporadic human Salmonella infections resulting from contamination of raw meat, poultry, and egg products processed in the United States from 1998 through 2003. The current model estimates the relative contribution of chicken (48%), ground beef (28%), turkey (17%), egg products (6%), intact beef (1%), and pork (<1%) across 109 Salmonella serotypes found in food commodities at point of processing. While interpretation of the attribution estimates is constrained by data inputs, the adapted model shows promise and may serve as a basis for a common approach to attribution of human salmonellosis and food safety decision-making in more than one country. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2011.


REDONDO BEACH, CA / ACCESSWIRE / December 13, 2016 / BioLargo, Inc. (OTCQB: BLGO), owner and developer of the breakthrough AOS (Advanced Oxidation System), a low-energy high-efficiency clean water technology, announced the start of a relationship with Chicago Bridge & Iron, NV (NYSE: CBI). According to the press release and a number of recent interviews with BioLargo's President & CEO, Dennis P. Calvert, the new relationship was formed to support the commercialization of BioLargo's proprietary technology and to provide independent performance verification. BioLargo also reports the AOS has been proven to disinfect and decontaminate water better, faster and at a lower cost than any other competing technology. Based on the breadth and significance of the technical performance claims for its AOS, BioLargo has a broad range of commercial opportunities for large industrial applications that must contend with water such as: maritime ballast water management systems, wastewater treatment, environmental remediation, food safety, oil & gas, mining, and agriculture. Its future uses also promise to impact the drinking water industry, including municipal, home use, and emerging nations. The company is also busy commercializing its new "CupriDyne Clean", an industrial odor control product launched last May. The company reports that the product is so effective and low-cost it is gaining rapid traction through trials with leaders within the waste handling industry and that it has had some early sales. Management believes sales will continue to climb, as they finalize supplier agreements with large multi-location customer accounts. CupriDyne Clean may also have an important role to play in industries that contend with volatile organic compounds like hydrogen sulfide (H2S) that impact air quality and safety. Dennis P. Calvert, President & CEO of BioLargo commented, "All of our technologies at BioLargo can serve a wide array of industrial customers that want clean water and clean air. Our mission to 'Make Life Better' includes helping industry tackle operational challenges cost effectively. That intersection of service is likely where our new relationship with CB&I will shine the brightest and we look forward to working with the exceptional team at CB&I to serve industry." With more than 40,000 employees, $13 billion in annual revenue and over $20 billion in future contracts, CB&I is a world-leading engineering, procurement, fabrication, and construction company, and a provider of environmental and infrastructure services. CB&I builds oil refineries, liquefied natural gas terminals, wastewater treatment plants, offshore platforms, and power plants. CB&I is also the world's largest tank construction company and builds tanks for the oil & gas, mining, water, and wastewater industries. The company also remediates hazardous waste problems. Clean water and clean air are at the heart of many of industries served by CB&I and BioLargo's technologies. Details in the first announcement were slim. This news sends notice to the investment world and to industry that Biolargo's technologies can have an important role to play in helping solve air and water contamination problems in a safe, effective and affordable way. Calvert has been quick to point out that the current version of the AOS has been engineered to serve entry-level clients and that important scale-up work is required to serve very large-scale industrial clients. BioLargo Water's research team recently showcased the first pre-commercial prototype of its AOS water treatment system, billed as the lowest cost and highest impact, scalable clean water technology in the world. By combining a cutting-edge carbon matrix, advanced iodine chemistry, and electrolysis, this technology rapidly and inexpensively eliminates bacteria and chemical contaminants in water without leaving residual toxins. University of Alberta researchers, in collaboration with BioLargo Water Scientists, have confirmed test results that validate the AOS achieves unprecedented rates of disinfection, eliminating infectious biological pathogens such as Salmonella, Listeria and E. coli. The AOS has also been proven effective in oxidizing and removing hard-to-manage soluble organics acids, aromatic compounds, and solvents faster than existing technologies and with very little input energy. Proven test results validate its important role for extremely high oxidation potential to tackle a long "watch list" of contaminants identified by the EPA. The company reports that future generations of the AOS will include the extraction and harvesting of important contaminants like sulfur, nitrates, phosphorus, and even heavy metals. The company's first "Alpha" AOS was constructed in collaboration with the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT)'s Center for Sensors and Systems Integration and with NAIT's Applied Bio/Nanotechnology Industrial Research Chair. Its "Beta" unit is expected to be ready for commercial trials in 2017. What places the AOS above competing technologies is its exceptionally high rate of disinfection (100x more effective than the competition, as verified in poultry production applications) and remarkably low capital and operational costs, made possible by its extremely low amount of electrical energy required to power the oxidation process. Studies have shown the AOS to achieve remarkable rates of disinfection at less than 1/20th the electrical energy input of competing technologies. The AOS is scalable and modular in design to meet a wide variety of needs in the marketplace. BioLargo is already working on what it calls the "Gen 2 AOS" for ultra-high flow rates. Because the markets for the AOS are very large and the needs so great, management reports that they believe it is only a matter of time before industry adopts this new breakthrough low cost technology. Oil and gas companies such as Exxon Mobil Corporation (NYSE: XOM), Halliburton Company (NYSE: HAL), Schlumberger Limited (NYSE: SLB), Chevron Corporation (NYSE: CVX) and Royal Dutch Shell plc (NYSE: RDS-A) could dramatically reduce water transportation, sourcing and disposal costs by adopting the AOS. The AOS has been shown to be cost effective at removing problematic contaminants from oil & gas "produced water", and any technology such as the AOS that could cost-effectively enable water recycling on-site could slash costs and greatly improve the bottom line for many producers that are now suffering big losses due to persistently low oil prices. It could also alleviate the costly problem of injecting produced water deep into injection wells, and simultaneously reduce pollution. The maritime industry has increasing regulatory pressure to eliminate the detrimental transfer and release of invasive marine species through the discharge of ballast water. This issue prompted the International Maritime Organization to impose regulations for the treatment and discharge of ballast water, and these new rules are scheduled to come into force beginning September of 2017. An estimated 65,000 ships must adopt ballast water treatment systems type approved under the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004 (BWMC). Approved systems must disinfect seawater to specified standards without adding any toxic elements to the discharged water. Global Water Intelligence estimates that the average cost for each ballast water management system will be more than $750,000 and the total cost to outfit every vessel will be about $46.5 billion. Because it is the highest impact, lowest cost, lowest energy technology known that can solve this problem, the AOS is could be the most practical solution to maritime operators such as DryShips, Inc. (NASDAQ: DRYS), Navios Maritime Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ: NM), Diana Shipping, Inc. (NYSE: DSX), Sino-Global Shipping America, Ltd. (NASDAQ: SINO), Diana Containerships Inc. (DCIX) and several others. In an effort to reduce the incidence of foodborne illness in the poultry industry, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service, FSIS, announced new, stricter federal standards to reduce Salmonella and Campylobacter in ground chicken and turkey products, as well as in raw chicken breasts, legs, and wings. The new regulations took effect July 1, 2016 and have the potential to impact sales of poultry processing operations of Tyson Foods, Inc. (NYSE: TSN), Pilgrims Pride Corporation, (NASDAQ: PPC), Sanderson Farms, Inc., (NASDAQ: SAFM), Hormel Foods Corporation, (NYSE: HRL), Perdue, Cargill, Smithfield Food, Inc., Conagra Foods, Inc., and every other poultry processor. Researchers at the University of Alberta confirmed that the AOS could be highly effective in reducing cross-contamination of pathogens when poultry is washed in chill tanks. Water quality of municipal water systems is also a growing concern and a few large water treatment companies that provide water services to millions of U.S. residents are American Water Works Company, Inc., (NYSE: AWK), American States Water Company (NYSE: AWR), Aqua America, Inc. (NYSE: WTR) and Veolia Environnement S.A. (OTC: VEOEY). The need for a better and lower cost clean water technology is urgent and CB&I may just be the perfect company to support implementation of breakthrough low-cost water and air treatment technologies developed by BioLargo, Inc. that can help solve problems across such a broad spectrum of industries. Except for the historical information presented herein, matters discussed in this release contain forward-looking statements that are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such statements. Emerging Growth LLC, which owns SECFilings.com, is not registered with any financial or securities regulatory authority, and does not provide nor claims to provide investment advice or recommendations to readers of this release. Emerging Growth LLC may from time to time have a position in the securities mentioned herein and may increase or decrease such positions without notice. For making specific investment decisions, readers should seek their own advice. Emerging Growth LLC may be compensated for its services in the form of cash-based compensation or equity securities in the companies it writes about, or a combination of the two. For full disclosure please visit: http://secfilings.com/Disclaimer.aspx. REDONDO BEACH, CA / ACCESSWIRE / December 13, 2016 / BioLargo, Inc. (OTCQB: BLGO), owner and developer of the breakthrough AOS (Advanced Oxidation System), a low-energy high-efficiency clean water technology, announced the start of a relationship with Chicago Bridge & Iron, NV (NYSE: CBI). According to the press release and a number of recent interviews with BioLargo's President & CEO, Dennis P. Calvert, the new relationship was formed to support the commercialization of BioLargo's proprietary technology and to provide independent performance verification. BioLargo also reports the AOS has been proven to disinfect and decontaminate water better, faster and at a lower cost than any other competing technology. Based on the breadth and significance of the technical performance claims for its AOS, BioLargo has a broad range of commercial opportunities for large industrial applications that must contend with water such as: maritime ballast water management systems, wastewater treatment, environmental remediation, food safety, oil & gas, mining, and agriculture. Its future uses also promise to impact the drinking water industry, including municipal, home use, and emerging nations. The company is also busy commercializing its new "CupriDyne Clean", an industrial odor control product launched last May. The company reports that the product is so effective and low-cost it is gaining rapid traction through trials with leaders within the waste handling industry and that it has had some early sales. Management believes sales will continue to climb, as they finalize supplier agreements with large multi-location customer accounts. CupriDyne Clean may also have an important role to play in industries that contend with volatile organic compounds like hydrogen sulfide (H2S) that impact air quality and safety. Dennis P. Calvert, President & CEO of BioLargo commented, "All of our technologies at BioLargo can serve a wide array of industrial customers that want clean water and clean air. Our mission to 'Make Life Better' includes helping industry tackle operational challenges cost effectively. That intersection of service is likely where our new relationship with CB&I will shine the brightest and we look forward to working with the exceptional team at CB&I to serve industry." With more than 40,000 employees, $13 billion in annual revenue and over $20 billion in future contracts, CB&I is a world-leading engineering, procurement, fabrication, and construction company, and a provider of environmental and infrastructure services. CB&I builds oil refineries, liquefied natural gas terminals, wastewater treatment plants, offshore platforms, and power plants. CB&I is also the world's largest tank construction company and builds tanks for the oil & gas, mining, water, and wastewater industries. The company also remediates hazardous waste problems. Clean water and clean air are at the heart of many of industries served by CB&I and BioLargo's technologies. Details in the first announcement were slim. This news sends notice to the investment world and to industry that Biolargo's technologies can have an important role to play in helping solve air and water contamination problems in a safe, effective and affordable way. Calvert has been quick to point out that the current version of the AOS has been engineered to serve entry-level clients and that important scale-up work is required to serve very large-scale industrial clients. BioLargo Water's research team recently showcased the first pre-commercial prototype of its AOS water treatment system, billed as the lowest cost and highest impact, scalable clean water technology in the world. By combining a cutting-edge carbon matrix, advanced iodine chemistry, and electrolysis, this technology rapidly and inexpensively eliminates bacteria and chemical contaminants in water without leaving residual toxins. University of Alberta researchers, in collaboration with BioLargo Water Scientists, have confirmed test results that validate the AOS achieves unprecedented rates of disinfection, eliminating infectious biological pathogens such as Salmonella, Listeria and E. coli. The AOS has also been proven effective in oxidizing and removing hard-to-manage soluble organics acids, aromatic compounds, and solvents faster than existing technologies and with very little input energy. Proven test results validate its important role for extremely high oxidation potential to tackle a long "watch list" of contaminants identified by the EPA. The company reports that future generations of the AOS will include the extraction and harvesting of important contaminants like sulfur, nitrates, phosphorus, and even heavy metals. The company's first "Alpha" AOS was constructed in collaboration with the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT)'s Center for Sensors and Systems Integration and with NAIT's Applied Bio/Nanotechnology Industrial Research Chair. Its "Beta" unit is expected to be ready for commercial trials in 2017. What places the AOS above competing technologies is its exceptionally high rate of disinfection (100x more effective than the competition, as verified in poultry production applications) and remarkably low capital and operational costs, made possible by its extremely low amount of electrical energy required to power the oxidation process. Studies have shown the AOS to achieve remarkable rates of disinfection at less than 1/20th the electrical energy input of competing technologies. The AOS is scalable and modular in design to meet a wide variety of needs in the marketplace. BioLargo is already working on what it calls the "Gen 2 AOS" for ultra-high flow rates. Because the markets for the AOS are very large and the needs so great, management reports that they believe it is only a matter of time before industry adopts this new breakthrough low cost technology. Oil and gas companies such as Exxon Mobil Corporation (NYSE: XOM), Halliburton Company (NYSE: HAL), Schlumberger Limited (NYSE: SLB), Chevron Corporation (NYSE: CVX) and Royal Dutch Shell plc (NYSE: RDS-A) could dramatically reduce water transportation, sourcing and disposal costs by adopting the AOS. The AOS has been shown to be cost effective at removing problematic contaminants from oil & gas "produced water", and any technology such as the AOS that could cost-effectively enable water recycling on-site could slash costs and greatly improve the bottom line for many producers that are now suffering big losses due to persistently low oil prices. It could also alleviate the costly problem of injecting produced water deep into injection wells, and simultaneously reduce pollution. The maritime industry has increasing regulatory pressure to eliminate the detrimental transfer and release of invasive marine species through the discharge of ballast water. This issue prompted the International Maritime Organization to impose regulations for the treatment and discharge of ballast water, and these new rules are scheduled to come into force beginning September of 2017. An estimated 65,000 ships must adopt ballast water treatment systems type approved under the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004 (BWMC). Approved systems must disinfect seawater to specified standards without adding any toxic elements to the discharged water. Global Water Intelligence estimates that the average cost for each ballast water management system will be more than $750,000 and the total cost to outfit every vessel will be about $46.5 billion. Because it is the highest impact, lowest cost, lowest energy technology known that can solve this problem, the AOS is could be the most practical solution to maritime operators such as DryShips, Inc. (NASDAQ: DRYS), Navios Maritime Holdings, Inc. (NASDAQ: NM), Diana Shipping, Inc. (NYSE: DSX), Sino-Global Shipping America, Ltd. (NASDAQ: SINO), Diana Containerships Inc. (DCIX) and several others. In an effort to reduce the incidence of foodborne illness in the poultry industry, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service, FSIS, announced new, stricter federal standards to reduce Salmonella and Campylobacter in ground chicken and turkey products, as well as in raw chicken breasts, legs, and wings. The new regulations took effect July 1, 2016 and have the potential to impact sales of poultry processing operations of Tyson Foods, Inc. (NYSE: TSN), Pilgrims Pride Corporation, (NASDAQ: PPC), Sanderson Farms, Inc., (NASDAQ: SAFM), Hormel Foods Corporation, (NYSE: HRL), Perdue, Cargill, Smithfield Food, Inc., Conagra Foods, Inc., and every other poultry processor. Researchers at the University of Alberta confirmed that the AOS could be highly effective in reducing cross-contamination of pathogens when poultry is washed in chill tanks. Water quality of municipal water systems is also a growing concern and a few large water treatment companies that provide water services to millions of U.S. residents are American Water Works Company, Inc., (NYSE: AWK), American States Water Company (NYSE: AWR), Aqua America, Inc. (NYSE: WTR) and Veolia Environnement S.A. (OTC: VEOEY). The need for a better and lower cost clean water technology is urgent and CB&I may just be the perfect company to support implementation of breakthrough low-cost water and air treatment technologies developed by BioLargo, Inc. that can help solve problems across such a broad spectrum of industries. Except for the historical information presented herein, matters discussed in this release contain forward-looking statements that are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such statements. Emerging Growth LLC, which owns SECFilings.com, is not registered with any financial or securities regulatory authority, and does not provide nor claims to provide investment advice or recommendations to readers of this release. Emerging Growth LLC may from time to time have a position in the securities mentioned herein and may increase or decrease such positions without notice. For making specific investment decisions, readers should seek their own advice. Emerging Growth LLC may be compensated for its services in the form of cash-based compensation or equity securities in the companies it writes about, or a combination of the two. For full disclosure please visit: http://secfilings.com/Disclaimer.aspx.


Ward T.J.,Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens and Mycology Research Unit | Usgaard T.,Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens and Mycology Research Unit | Evans P.,Food Safety and Inspection Service
Applied and Environmental Microbiology | Year: 2010

A 30-probe assay was developed for simultaneous classification of Listeria monocytogenes isolates by lineage(I to IV) major serogroup (4b1/2b1/2aand 1/2c) and epidemic clone (EC) type (ECI ECIa ECII and ECIII). The assay was designed to facilitate rapid strain characterization and the integration of subtype data into risk-based inspection programs. © 2010, American Society for Microbiology.


PubMed | Food Safety and Inspection Service
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Foodborne pathogens and disease | Year: 2011

Mathematical models that estimate the proportion of foodborne illnesses attributable to food commodities at specific points in the food chain may be useful to risk managers and policy makers to formulate public health goals, prioritize interventions, and document the effectiveness of mitigations aimed at reducing illness. Using human surveillance data on laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Salmonella testing data from U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Services regulatory programs, we developed a point-of-processing foodborne illness attribution model by adapting the Hald Salmonella Bayesian source attribution model. Key model outputs include estimates of the relative proportions of domestically acquired sporadic human Salmonella infections resulting from contamination of raw meat, poultry, and egg products processed in the United States from 1998 through 2003. The current model estimates the relative contribution of chicken (48%), ground beef (28%), turkey (17%), egg products (6%), intact beef (1%), and pork (<1%) across 109 Salmonella serotypes found in food commodities at point of processing. While interpretation of the attribution estimates is constrained by data inputs, the adapted model shows promise and may serve as a basis for a common approach to attribution of human salmonellosis and food safety decision-making in more than one country.


The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service has issued an alert on possible salmonella contamination in a chicken salad sold at Costco Store No. 1190, located in Lynnwood in the state of Washington. The chicken salad products included in the public health alert are those produced between Aug. 26 and Sept. 2. The product that comes with the name "Costco Rotisserie Chicken Salad" is sold directly to customers that visit the Costco Store in Lynnwood. The chicken salad produced during the said date is available in varying weights. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is said to have called FSIS's attention on illness linked to salmonella infection in Washington on Sept. 26. The FSIS, along with the Washington State Department of Health and the CDC, found that the rotisserie chicken salad sold in the specified store could be causing the illness. The federal services that investigated the issue identified four cases linked to salmonella outbreak in the region between Sept. 4 and Sept. 6 with the help of epidemiological evidence. It was revealed on further investigation that three patients consumed the rotisserie chicken salad bought from the said Costco outlet on Aug. 26, Aug. 31 and Sept. 2. However, none of the suspected products tested positive for the particular strain of salmonella associated with the infection. When clinical isolates were subjected to an antibiotic resistance test, three were found to be resistant to only one of the antibiotics used in the treatment of salmonellosis, which was tetracycline. The agencies are, however, working in full swing on the issue in order to contain a possible salmonella outbreak in the locality. Salmonellosis is a food-borne infection caused by salmonella, marked by symptoms including abdominal cramps, diarrhea and fever experienced within 12 to 72 hours of consumption of contaminated food. People suffering salmonellosis usually recover within four to seven days of illness. Meanwhile, people that bought the chicken salad on Aug. 26, Aug. 31 and Sept. 2 are warned not to eat it and are also asked to either dispose or return the product to the place of purchase. "FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume rotisserie chicken that has been cooked to a temperature of 165° F," reads the public health alert. To know whether rotisserie chicken is cooked thoroughly at the said temperature, people are advised to make use of a food thermometer that is capable of measuring the internal temperature accurately. People are also recommended to wash their hands for 20 seconds prior to and after handling raw meat products and poultry. Using separate chopping boards for cutting meat and vegetables is also recommended. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | December 15, 2015
Site: www.sej.org

"The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) finalized a new rule Monday that will require all producers of raw ground beef to keep records of where the meat has come from. The rule aims  to help FSIS improve it’s ability to determine the source of foodborne illnesses linked to ground beef, and by doing more quickly stop the outbreak from spreading when it occur. The agency said outbreak investigations are hindered when retail stores produce ground beef by mixing product from various sources, but fail to keep clear records that would allow investigators to determine which supplier produced the unsafe product."

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