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News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(Prague, 11 May, 2017) Gluten-free products cannot be considered as sufficient substitutes for their gluten-containing counterparts, prompting scientists to call for the reformulation of gluten free items with healthier raw materials to ensure healthy childhood nutrition. The outcomes of the study(1), presented today at the 50th Annual Congress of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition, show that gluten-free items have a significantly higher energy content and a different nutritional composition to their gluten-containing counterparts. Many of the gluten-containing products -- especially breads, pastas, pizzas and flours -- also contained up to three times more protein than their gluten free substitutes. The imbalances highlighted in the study could impact children's growth and increase the risk of childhood obesity. The study assessed 654 gluten-free products, which were compared with 655 gluten-containing products. Further key findings include: A gluten-free diet is followed as a life-long therapy for patients with coeliac disease, including children, which now affects around 1% of the European population (2). As gluten-free products replace many staple foods in the diet, such as bread and pasta, the intake of these products therefore play a very important role for many consumers. A growing number of people are also turning towards these products as a wellbeing choice, even when they are not diagnosed with coeliac disease. ESPGHAN expert and lead researcher, Dr Joaquim Calvo Lerma, explains "As more and more people are following a gluten-free diet to effectively manage coeliac disease, it is imperative that foods marketed as substitutes are reformulated to ensure that they truly do have similar nutritional values. This is especially important for children, as a well-balanced diet is essential to healthy growth and development." Experts are warning that not only are gluten-free products different in their nutritional composition, but consumers may not be aware of these unhealthy variances due to poor nutritional labelling. Dr Sandra Martínez -Barona, fellow lead researcher, states that the nutritional labelling on gluten-free products should be clearer. She comments "Where nutritional values of gluten-free products do vary significantly from their gluten-containing counterparts, such as having higher levels of saturated fat, labelling needs to clearly indicate this so that patients, parents and carers can make informed decisions. Consumers should also be provided with guidance to enhance their understanding of the nutritional compositions of products, in both gluten-free and gluten-containing products, to allow them to make more informed purchases and ensure a healthier diet is followed." Daciana Sarbu MEP, Vice-Chair of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, adds "EU law provides for mandatory nutritional labelling of pre-packed foods. However, food products that are not pre-packed, which could include gluten-free bread or pizzas, are not subject to the same labelling requirements. In this case, consumers could be less aware of important nutritional differences with potentially significant health impacts. I have always supported so-called 'traffic light' labelling to facilitate easy comparison between products for key nutrients including protein, fat and sugars." For further information, or to speak to an expert, please email media@espghan.org or call James M. Butcher on +44 (0) 1444 811 099. Download an infographic on Coeliac Disease in Children here: http://www. Dr Joaquim Calvo Lerma and Dr Sandra Martínez -Barona are both members of the The Research Group on Celiac Disease and Digestive Immunopathology at the Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria La Fe in Valencia, Spain. Daciana Sarbu MEP is a representative the Group of the Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats. She is the Vice-Chair of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety in the European Parliament. The European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) is a multi-professional organisation whose aim is to promote the health of children with special attention to the gastrointestinal tract, liver and nutritional status, through knowledge creation, the dissemination of science based information, the promotion of best practice in the delivery of care and the provision of high quality education for paediatric gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition professionals in Europe and beyond. Find out more by visiting http://www. About the 50th Annual Meeting of ESPGHAN The 50th Annual Meeting of ESPGHAN is taking place from Wednesday 10 to Saturday 13 May 2017, in Prague, Czech Republic. Every year the ESPGHAN meeting attracts the key opinion leaders in the field of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition from across Europe and all five continents, turning it into the largest conference of its kind worldwide. The Annual Meeting attracts over 4,000 experts from over 100 countries, all operating in the fields of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, turning it into the largest conference of its kind worldwide. This year the meeting has received a record number of 839 accepted abstracts. 1. Martínez-Barona, S., Calvo Lerma, J. et al. Comprehensive analysis of the nutritional profile of gluten-free products as compared to their gluten-containing counterparts. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. Prague, Czech Republic, 11 May, 2017. 2. The Association of European Coeliac Societies (AOECS). Homepage of http://www. [Accessed: 04.05.2017].


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The outcomes of the study, presented today at the 50th Annual Congress of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition, show that gluten-free items have a significantly higher energy content and a different nutritional composition to their gluten-containing counterparts. Many of the gluten-containing products - especially breads, pastas, pizzas and flours - also contained up to three times more protein than their gluten free substitutes. The imbalances highlighted in the study could impact children's growth and increase the risk of childhood obesity. ESPGHAN expert and lead researcher, Dr Joaquim Calvo Lerma, explains, "As more and more people are following a gluten-free diet to effectively manage coeliac disease, it is imperative that foods marketed as substitutes are reformulated to ensure that they truly do have similar nutritional values. This is especially important for children, as a well-balanced diet is essential to healthy growth and development." Experts are also warning that consumers may not be aware of these unhealthy variances due to poor nutritional labelling. Dr Martinez-Barona, fellow lead researcher comments, "Where nutritional values of gluten-free products do vary significantly from their gluten-containing counterparts, labelling needs to clearly indicate this. Consumers should also be provided with guidance to enhance their understanding of the nutritional compositions of products to allow them to make more informed purchases and ensure a healthier diet is followed." Daciana Sarbu MEP, Vice-Chair of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, adds, "Gluten-free products that are not pre-packed are not subject to the same labelling requirements as pre-packed products. In this case, consumers could be less aware of important nutritional differences with potentially significant health impacts. I have always supported so-called 'traffic light' labelling to facilitate easy comparison between products for key nutrients including protein, fat and sugars." For further information please email media@espghan.org or call James M. Butcher on +44(0)1444-811-099. SOURCE The 50th Annual Congress of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology


CCC Ingredients is pleased to announce it will distribute Solvay Aroma Performance's vanillin based product across Canada TORONTO, ON--(Marketwired - May 09, 2017) - CCC Ingredients (www.ccc-group.com), a division of Canada Colors and Chemicals Limited (CCC), is pleased to announce that it will distribute Solvay Aroma Performance's vanillin based product line within the food, pharmaceutical, and personal care industries across Canada. The product range represented by CCC Ingredients includes Rhovanil® Vanillin, Solvay's flagship brand and market reference for food & flavors and with highest purity levels on the market; Rhovanil® Natural, 'natural' vanillin solution to replace vanilla bean, fully compliant with both US, Canadian and European flavor regulations; Rhodiarome® Ethyl-Vanillin, the only ethyl-vanillin product on the market made from a fully back-integrated process. Additionally, CCC Ingredients will also carry Solvay's Vanillin based functional solutions -- 'Vanifolia,' newly designed natural range of flavors that serves as a replacement for vanilla bean and 'Govanil.' "Solvay's vanillin based product line enhances our portfolio and the range of value-add and specialty ingredients that we offer to our customers. We are very excited to partner with Solvay's Aroma Performance group, a world leading vanillin producer, rigorous in the quality, safety and traceability of its products & setting industry standards," said Sarah Morrison, Business Director - Ingredients, at CCC. Creating flavours and fragrances from vanillin since 1884, Solvay Aroma Performance was the first company to synthesize and produce the vanillin molecule on an industrial scale. All vanillin and ethyl-vanillin flavours are Food Safety System Certification (FSSC) 22000 certified, a global standard that attests to the safety of the products manufactured by Solvay. "We are pleased to partner with CCC Ingredients and look forward to expanding our footprint in Canada. CCC's reputation, distribution footprint, and seasoned technical, sales and management team is well suited to our product portfolio and commitment to serve the nutrition industry," said Eric Santos, Director of Commercial Management for Solvay Aroma Performance, North America. About CCC Ingredients: Serving manufacturers in the personal care, pharmaceutical, and food industries for over a quarter century, CCC Ingredients is a leading Canadian supplier of quality specialty ingredients, chemicals, and additives. A division of Canada Colors and Chemicals Limited, CCC Ingredients is focused on providing their customers with innovative ingredients at competitive prices. Industry professionals with technical, sales and marketing expertise, the CCC Ingredients team work together to deliver excellent customer service, timely delivery, and efficient and cost-effective solutions. For more information about CCC Ingredients, please visit www.ccc-ingredients.com.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.fooddive.com

How does bad news about food companies spread? Anthony LaFauce, vice president of the PNConnect division of PR firm Porter Novelli, sketched out a scenario: A mom in Wichita follows a yoga teacher on Instagram. Most of this teacher’s feed is pictures of yoga poses, tranquil scenes, sayings of self-affirmation, and healthy food. Then the yoga teacher gets food poisoning at a chain restaurant. She adds an angry post with a hashtag decrying the restaurant and a link to a blog from someone else trashing the restaurant. Just like that, the mom in Wichita believes the blogger and turns against the chain restaurant, sharing the posts to all her connections across social networks. Whatever message is in the angry blog — true or not — is endorsed as truth. And the chain restaurant is now one step closer to dealing with a full-blown social media communication crisis. “Those kinds of short channels have tentacles that reach out to people and pull them back to something more substantial,” LaFauce told Food Dive at the Food Safety Summit in Chicago. While people say they generally don’t trust social media, they do trust their family and friends, according to Michael DeAngelis, Porter Novelli’s nutrition director. Someone like the yoga teacher isn’t considered a stranger on social media — even if the mom has never actually met them in person. The mom in Wichita would see it as a post from a friend. Crisis communications in the food business has never been easy. But with the advent of social media, it's become much more difficult. “There are many more voices, and much more to manage,” DeAngelis told Food Dive. In a world dominated by tweets, likes and snaps, food companies need more preparation and coordination for crisis messaging, according to LaFauce and DeAngelis. After all, crisis is inevitable — it's how a company reacts that will ultimately decide its future. LaFauce did not mince words in outlining the importance of preparing for a crisis. “If you don’t handle a crisis well, you will have no credibility going forward,” he said. Take Tylenol, the drug manufacturer that had some of its tablets contaminated with cyanide in 1982. The company responded by immediately pulling all products off shelves nationwide. The tampering probably could have been traced to specific factories, dates or lots. But by pulling all of the products off the shelves, the company took a strong stance — immediately restoring consumers’ faith in its desire to produce a completely safe product. To make the best of bad situations, companies need to start preparing for worst-case scenarios well in advance. Just like the U.S. military has a plan in case of a zombie apocalypse, food manufacturers should put together plans to deal with their worst-case scenarios, according to LaFauce. In 2017, worst-case scenarios are complicated by the internet and social media. Online — where anyone can appear to be an expert in anything and easily say whatever they want — the lines between fact and reality can easily be blurred. “In crisis management, reality and perception mean a lot — but now perception can be reality,” DeAngelis said. ​LaFauce recommends that companies actually plan out responses to these worst case scenarios — such as a serious foodborne illness caused by the product or even a total product line recall due to intentional contamination. This shouldn’t just be a set of talking points or a plan for who should speak for the company — though both are important. Companies should actually build pages on their website and write social media posts explaining the problem to concerned consumers, LaFauce said. The reasons for this are two-fold: First, the social media posts and webpages are ready to be published as soon as the problem occurs — and a company’s speed in responding to a worst-case scenario crisis is vital. But more importantly, statements during situations like these should be vetted and approved by legal counsel before publication, LaFauce said. If the statements are written in advance, they can be cleared in advance. That will make it much easier to publish statements when they are actually needed — especially since crises don’t always happen during normal business hours. There are ways to know when there is a crisis looming on social media. If there are negative things happening to a company, like recalls or plant shutdowns, the impending crisis is hard to miss. But through social media, one post has the power to go viral — and there are ways to see if this is about to happen, LaFauce said. Many tools exist that enable companies to “listen” to conversations on social media. Paid services like Meltwater and Sysomos and free ones like Google Advanced Search allow companies to track online conversations about their products. To “listen” to online conversations, LaFauce said he often makes a customized query that looks for product names, plus relevant hashtags and trigger words like “gross,” “disgusting” or “sick.” This query can bring up many social media conversations, which are then evaluated to determine if they are passing complaints or part of a conversation — or if they suggest a larger wave of negative posts may be around the corner. Consumers are often shocked to learn that their online social media conversations are scrutinized by food companies and their PR firms to look for latent negative sentiment, he said. But consumers should know that food companies aren’t the only ones mining their social media content — it's also commonly used for marketing and advertising. As social networks continue to develop, the ways in which data needs to be mined are growing. “What we’re really afraid of is the concept of the pop-up network,” LaFauce told Food Dive. This sort of instantaneous network is often born from a quick and passionate discussion on social media: A picture of a sunrise on Instagram could inspire a deep discussion on breakfast. Someone could enter that discussion and use it to smear a cereal brand that uses GMOs. While the discussion may be forgotten in a few hours, he said, the things said in it were influential and spread a message that is hard to contain or control. When crisis strikes, consumers don't necessarily take the time to seek out the most credible sources. For example: If a brand of bagged salad gets recalled, the consumer may not seek out information or updates from the brand first. Instead, they’re more likely to type a few keywords into Google or do a quick search on Twitter. The problem with this consumer approach is that it’s harder for companies themselves to make sure their messaging gets heard. Google’s algorithm will bring up different pages. At the top of the search results could be posts from bloggers about the recall that may not be fully true — or a news story reporting the incident’s most unsavory facts. ​LaFauce said there are ways to try to keep a company’s own message top-of-search in times of crisis. Preparing statements and webpages in advance can help. Through search-engine optimization and hashtags, these pages and posts can be put together in a way to increase the likelihood that a Google search will find and rank them highly. On social media, companies should cultivate influential voices to be their defenders. “You want to think long-term on relationships,” DeAngelis said. “…You build your reputation with them over time.” These influential voices usually belong to bloggers or active social media users who already feel positively about a product. Companies often do things to build relationships with them, like bringing them to company HQ or communicating with them one-on-one. Through this work, not only is the brand establishing a solid advance team, but it’s also getting people in place who are more likely to be trusted by ordinary consumers to deny any false rumors on social media. Companies should be prepared to respond to social media flare ups, according to LaFauce and DeAngelis. The response — as well as what rises to the level of meriting a response — needs to be thought through and planned out. Consumers complaining about a new color on a package may not warrant personal responses from the company’s own branded accounts. But accusations that a company uses its product to poison people might be. “Social media really does change everything,” DeAngelis said.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

NSF International, a global public health and safety organization that provides food safety and quality assurance services across all food supply chain sectors, announced the recipients of the 2017 NSF Food Safety Leadership Awards today at the 2017 Food Safety Summit in Rosemont, Illinois: 2017 NSF Food Safety Leadership Lifetime Achievement Awards: Jack J. Guzewich, MPH Consultant and Trainer in Foodborne Disease Epidemiology and Food Emergency Response NSF International’s Food Safety Leadership Awards recognize individuals and organizations for real and lasting improvements in food safety. Created in 2004, the awards encourage the development of educational programs, processes and technologies to advance food safety. Each year, an independent panel of food safety experts from academia, industry and the regulatory community reviews nominations from around the world to select the recipients. Nominations are evaluated on the basis of innovation, impact and contribution to the advancement of food safety. “These awards honor the recipients for their contributions to food safety and the protection of public health. The work of Jack Guzewich, David Theno and Lee-Ann Jaykus has contributed to important advances in food safety research, industry innovation and pathogen mitigation. Their leadership and enthusiasm in science-based research, collaboration and information sharing to help solve vital food safety issues embodies the spirit of NSF International’s Food Safety Leadership Awards,” said Kevan P. Lawlor, NSF International President and Chief Executive Officer. Lifetime Achievement Award: Jack J. Guzewich, MPH, Consultant and Trainer in Foodborne Disease Epidemiology and Food Emergency Response Over his 46-year career, Jack J. Guzewich has been a national leader in food safety regulation and the epidemiology of foodborne disease. He is a proponent of environmental assessment including root cause analysis to investigate the causes of foodborne disease outbreaks and food contamination events. Much of his career was spent on investigations to understand how food becomes contaminated with foodborne pathogens and the ecology of pathogens in various environments. Mr. Guzewich directed the New York State Department of Health’s food safety program for 17 years and created the Foodborne Disease Surveillance System (FBDS), an extensive database of reported foodborne disease outbreaks including their contributing factors. FBDS was one of the first systems of its kind and served as a precursor to today’s National Outbreak Reporting System. Mr. Guzewich guided the adoption of New York’s regulation to prohibit bare-hand contact with ready-to-eat foods and worked to include these provisions in the FDA Food Code. He was instrumental in documenting gastroenteritis and Salmonella enteritidis outbreaks associated with shellfish and shelled eggs, respectively, by identifying trends and developing interventions to prevent future outbreaks. As a result, control recommendations implemented by New York under his leadership led to national improvements as provided in the 2009 Egg Safety Final Rule. At the FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Mr. Guzewich created and led the Center’s Emergency Coordination and Response program with a strong emphasis on prevention and control of foodborne disease. He developed the FDA procedures for investigating produce farms implicated in outbreaks or contamination events to identify the root causes of contamination, which required an environmental assessment versus a routine inspection. He worked very closely with the CDC’s Environmental Health Specialist Network to help develop the National Environmental Assessment Reporting System which is used by several states to help identify the root causes of foodborne disease outbreaks. He was also instrumental in developing the publication Procedures to Investigate Foodborne Illness and contributed to the first editions of Guidelines for Foodborne Disease Outbreak Response and Guidelines for Foodborne Disease Outbreak Response – Toolkit. “Jack Guzewich is the epitome of a food safety leader,” says Dale L. Morse, MD, Associate Director for Food Safety, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, CDC. “His career was built on hard work, innovative creation of foodborne illness surveillance networks and databases, application of these networks to identify causes and initiate long-term control recommendations, and educational pursuits to train the next generation of food safety leaders.” Lifetime Achievement Award: David M. Theno, Ph.D., CEO/CBIO, Gray Dog Partners, Inc. Throughout his 40-year career, Dr. David M. Theno’s work set new standards for food safety leadership and management in food production and in the foodservice industry. He has been instrumental in demonstrating how the scientific community and the meat/food industry can work together to solve food safety challenges. Dr. Theno installed the first Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) program in an animal protein production plant while at Foster Farms in the mid-1980s. His work in the early 1990s at Jack in the Box is widely credited with setting new standards for food safety leadership and management in all aspects of food production. After an Escherichia coli (E. coli) 0157:H7 infection of the chain’s burgers caused a foodborne illness outbreak in the Pacific Northwest, he developed the first comprehensive food safety management plan for a foodservice chain. He also implemented a finished ground beef testing protocol, a comprehensive supply chain auditing system and a “test and hold” protocol for ground beef that is now an industry standard. This management program resulted in a significant reduction of foodborne illness outbreaks in the foodservice industry, and all major foodservice chain organizations today have implemented a food safety management plan based on this program. Serving as a member of the USDA’s National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods, Dr. Theno was instrumental in changing the way the USDA and the industry look at food safety. He played an essential role in helping guide the beef industry’s research activities to better understand E. coli O157, and helped form the Beef Industry Food Safety Council, which develops and updates food safety practices that are critical for the food industry. Dr. Theno is one of the original authors of the HACCP guidance issued by FDA and USDA/FSIS that is in place today, and has authored numerous scientific and trade publication articles. “David Theno’s leadership through the E. coli outbreaks in the 1990s set the stage for the entire industry to come together in a non-competitive, collaborative effort to employ science-based solutions to tackle emerging pathogenic threats,” says Thomas H. Powell, Ph.D., CAE, Executive Director, American Meat Science Association. “Dr. Theno led the effort to identify and implement viable interventions and spurred research into new intervention strategies. His greatest impact was his unswerving dedication to protecting the consumer and his complete transparency with other industry food safety leaders. He freely shared the valuable insights he gained through the fiery trials on the front lines of the early outbreaks.” Dr. Lee-Ann Jaykus has over 30 years’ experience advancing the science of food safety through applied infection prevention and control science, especially regarding norovirus. She has collaborated on many large, multi-institutional projects on foodborne pathogens and food virology, including developing methods to detect human enteric virus contamination in foods and environmental samples, and better understanding the dynamics of virus transmission through the food chain. She serves as the Scientific Director of the USDA-NIFA Food Virology Collaborative (NoroCORE), a team of 30-plus scientists representing 18 academic and government institutions working to develop improved tools, skills and capacity to understand and control foodborne virus disease risks. Under Dr. Jaykus’ direction, NoroCORE has worked closely with companies, trade organizations, government regulators and public health entities to identify and address the most important food virology problems, and translate results into real-world processes and actions. These include cultivating human norovirus which had eluded scientists for 50 years, developing a risk-modeling program for tracking norovirus that can calculate disease risk and screen strategies for managing contamination in food service and health care facilities, confirming that alcohol-based hand sanitizers cannot completely inactivate norovirus and working to modify FDA Food Code recommendations to facilitate norovirus control. In her academic career, Dr. Jaykus has taught graduate and undergraduate courses in food microbiology and safety, mentored over 30 graduate students and post-doctoral research associates, and authored over 150 publications. “I have never met a scientist or food safety professional as enthusiastic and competent as Dr. Jaykus is in defining the issues, developing key needs, initiating the means to fill gaps and translating findings quickly into industry applications,” says Hal King, Ph.D., President/CEO of Public Health Innovations LLC. “Her work will lead to improved methods to prevent norovirus foodborne disease infections around the world, and she has elevated our nation’s food safety competencies across all sectors of the food chain.” Editor’s note: For more information on the NSF Food Safety Leadership Awards or to schedule an interview with an NSF International food safety expert, contact Liz Nowland-Margolis at media(at)nsf.org or +1 734-418-6624. About NSF International: NSF International (nsf.org) is a global independent organization that writes standards, and tests and certifies products for the food, water and consumer goods industries to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment. Founded in 1944, NSF is committed to protecting human health and safety worldwide. NSF International is a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization Collaborating Center on Food Safety, Water Quality and Indoor Environment. NSF International provides expertise and accredited food services across all supply chain sectors, including agriculture, animal feed and welfare, produce, processing, distribution, dairy, seafood, quality management software, retail and restaurants. Services include Global Food Safety Initiative, foodservice equipment and nonfood compounds certification, HACCP validation and inspection, label claims verification and certification, DNA and food package testing, product and process development, food fraud consulting and training, and organic and Certified Transitional certification through Quality Assurance International (QAI).


-- Aid & Development Asia Summit is fast approaching!You are invited to take part and network with decision makers and advisors from government, UN agencies, NGOs, civil society, donors and solution providers on 14-15 June 2017 at the MICC-2 in Naypyitaw, Myanmar.You will have opportunity todiscuss best practice, policy updates and donor strategy in Southeast Asia, as well as gain insight into the latest technological innovations and development programmes.The summit gathers an excellent panellists panel from NGOs, UN agencies, regional governments and the private sector will addresses the following topics:• Mobile for Development Programmes and Innovations• Funding and Procurement Trends in Myanmar and Southeast Asia• Innovations and Policies to Support Community Resilience & Food Security• Building a Culture of Resilience and Strengthening Disaster Preparedness• Early Warning Systems, Data Collection and Mapping• Technologies and Initiatives for Meeting Education SDGs in Myanmar• Building Successful Public-Private-People Partnerships• Innovations and Best Practice to Tackle Communicable Diseases• Improving Maternal and Child Health, as well as WASH practices• Data Strategy to Support SDGs• Communication, Connectivity and Social Networks• Humanitarian Logistics: Getting Aid into Areas of Reduced Infrastructure• Cash-Based Programmes and Financial InclusionAmongst 40+ expert speakers at the Aid & Development Asia Summit 2017 are:·  Dr Tin Htut, Permanent Secretary,·  Dr. That Zin Htoo, Assistant Permanent Secretary,· Peter Batchelor, Country Director,· Vikram Kumar, Country Manager,· U Khant Zaw, Director General, Department of Rural Development,· Niiara Abliamitova, Chief Procurement Officer,· Moe Thu, Associate Director, Humanitarian & Emergency Affairs, Myanmar,· Shashank Mishra, Disaster Risk Reduction Program Director,· Dr Aung Kyaw Htut, Deputy Secretary General,· Siemon Hollema, Senior Programme & Policy Adviser for Asia & the Pacific,· Ed Pauker, Country Director, Myanmar,· Kieran Gorman-Best, Head of Mission, Myanmar,· Sridhar Dharmapuri, Senior Food Safety and Nutrition Officer,· Dr Stephan Paul Jost, Country Representative, Myanmar,· Simon Gee, Managing Director, Asia-Pacific,· Ernesto Castro-Garcia, Director of Regional Programs Asia-Pacific,The Aid & Development Asia Summit offers two days of presentations, engaging panel and roundtable discussions, case studies; networking lunches and an evening reception on Wednesday 14th June to meet with top-level decision-makers and influencers in Asian humanitarian aid and development sector.Take a look at the 2017 agenda and the speaker list to date, visit http://asia.aidforum.org There are only 50 places left, don't miss out and register now ( http://asia.aidforum.org/ register


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

The outcomes of the study, presented today at the 50th Annual Congress of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition, show that gluten-free items have a significantly higher energy content and a different nutritional composition to their gluten-containing counterparts. Many of the gluten-containing products - especially breads, pastas, pizzas and flours - also contained up to three times more protein than their gluten free substitutes. The imbalances highlighted in the study could impact children's growth and increase the risk of childhood obesity. ESPGHAN expert and lead researcher, Dr Joaquim Calvo Lerma, explains, "As more and more people are following a gluten-free diet to effectively manage coeliac disease, it is imperative that foods marketed as substitutes are reformulated to ensure that they truly do have similar nutritional values. This is especially important for children, as a well-balanced diet is essential to healthy growth and development." Experts are also warning that consumers may not be aware of these unhealthy variances due to poor nutritional labelling. Dr Martinez-Barona, fellow lead researcher comments, "Where nutritional values of gluten-free products do vary significantly from their gluten-containing counterparts, labelling needs to clearly indicate this. Consumers should also be provided with guidance to enhance their understanding of the nutritional compositions of products to allow them to make more informed purchases and ensure a healthier diet is followed." Daciana Sarbu MEP, Vice-Chair of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, adds, "Gluten-free products that are not pre-packed are not subject to the same labelling requirements as pre-packed products. In this case, consumers could be less aware of important nutritional differences with potentially significant health impacts. I have always supported so-called 'traffic light' labelling to facilitate easy comparison between products for key nutrients including protein, fat and sugars." For further information please email media@espghan.org or call James M. Butcher on +44(0)1444-811-099. SOURCE The 50th Annual Congress of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.sej.org

"U.S. EPA violated the Endangered Species Act when it issued 59 pesticide registrations between 2007 and 2012, a federal court has found. The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California agreed with beekeepers, wildlife groups and food safety advocates that EPA unlawfully failed to consult with wildlife agencies on the impacts of the pesticides. Senior Judge Maxine Chesney, a Clinton appointee, yesterday issued the opinion for the court. At issue are neonicotinoid-containing pesticides used for agricultural, landscaping and ornamental purposes. Studies have linked neonicotinoids to bee harm, though EPA earlier this year issued a preliminary risk assessment finding compounds do not pose significant risks to bee colonies. The Center for Food Safety, Beyond Pesticides, the Sierra Club and the Center for Environmental Health — which have all raised concerns about the impacts on neonicotinoids on bees — in 2013 joined individual beekeepers in bringing the lawsuit against EPA."


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Phenomenex’s new food testing guide helps the industry meet increasing demands for quality and safety testing and adhere to the guidelines of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FMSA). The 160-page guide presents more than 150 applications using HPLC, LC/MS, UHPLC/MS, GC, GC/MS and sample preparation techniques and covers a wide range of compound classes including contaminants, mycotoxins, pesticides, veterinary pharmaceuticals, sugars, dietary supplements and vitamins, along with new GC tools for fast fatty acids analysis. Phenomenex, Inc. www.phenomenex.com, 310-212-0555


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

TraQtion, a leading provider of cloud-based quality and compliance software, is now used by P.F. Chang’s China Bistro and Pei Wei Asian Diner. TraQtion will help to strengthen food and beverage safety from “farm to wok” by tracking compliance and risk across suppliers, products and sites. The software provides P.F. Chang’s and Pei Wei restaurants with an automated, unique and trusted way to manage their products and global supply chains. P.F. Chang’s China Bistro and Pei Wei Asian Diner, Asian-themed restaurants operating in over 450 locations throughout the United States and in international markets, have implemented TraQtion to enhance their drive for continuous improvement and management of critical safety factors. With a collaborative platform for suppliers and service providers, P.F. Chang’s and Pei Wei can act as one team around one dataset with one quality and compliance process. These restaurants now leverage TraQtion’s proprietary intelligent compliance engine to store supply-chain data and to scan, evaluate and interpret the data to ensure it meets their requirements. TraQtion will immediately alert them of higher-risk profile suppliers, products and sites for quick follow-up actions, which helps protect consumers and the respected P.F. Chang’s and Pei Wei brands. This is essential given today’s rapidly changing global supply chains. “TraQtion has been implemented to automatically track P.F. Chang’s and Pei Wei quality and compliance criteria while working seamlessly with their current processes and procedures,” said Sireesha Mandava, Senior Director, TraQtion. “TraQtion provides P.F. Chang’s and Pei Wei the ability to move away from mundane work and focus only on what needs attention.” TraQtion offers a suite of services providing control and visibility into the supply chain including supplier compliance, product compliance and site compliance — all using cloud-based tools with a central dashboard providing at-a-glance performance ratings for quick action and streamlined communications across a client’s supply chain. “We are excited to have implemented TraQtion which enables us to manage our global supply chain like never before,” said Michael Moomijan, Director, Quality Assurance and Food Safety, P.F. Chang’s and Pei Wei. “Being able to easily access all the data and anticipate any potential problems allows us to take preventative measures key to the success of P.F. Chang’s and Pei Wei restaurants. We are pleased to partner with an organization like TraQtion, which has the knowledge and experience to work with us at protecting our brands.” Some of TraQtion’s capabilities used by P.F. Chang’s and Pei Wei include: To further understand how TraQtion can best support your business and to schedule a demo of the solution, please visit the TraQtion website. For more information about TraQtion, please contact info(at)TraQtion.com or Andrew Thorne at athorne(at)traqtion.com or +1-734-645-6790. For media inquiries, please contact Liz Nowland-Margolis at media(at)nsf.org or +1-734-418-6624 About TraQtion: TraQtion is a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) solution that manages food safety, quality and compliance for supply chains, products and sites. Developed from the ground up using NSF International's food safety and quality expertise, TraQtion serves leading manufacturers, retailers and restaurants around the world that place a high emphasis on customer satisfaction and safety. TraQtion is headquartered in Ann Arbor, Michigan and is a wholly owned subsidiary of NSF International. (traqtion.com)

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