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Silva-Carrillo Y.,Autonomous University of Nayarit | Hernandez C.,Food Research And Development Center Ac | Hardy R.W.,University of Idaho | Gonzalez-Rodriguez B.,Food Research And Development Center Ac | Castillo-Vargasmachuca S.,Autonomous University of Nayarit
Aquaculture | Year: 2012

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the replacement of fish meal (FM) with soybean meal (SBM) in diets for juvenile spotted rose snapper with the overall goal of identifying practical diet formulations for commercial production of the spotted rose snapper. The response of spotted rose snapper to diets contained graded levels of FM was evaluated by measuring weight gain, feed efficiency, body composition and blood chemistry during a 12-week period. Four diets were formulated (43.7% crude protein, 14% crude lipid and 19.6kJg -1 gross energy) with 0, 20, 40 or 60% SMB protein replacing FM in diets. Diets were fed to juvenile spotted rose snapper (mean initial weight 17.75±0.03g) for 12weeks, and weight gain, feed efficiency, body composition and blood chemistry were assessed at the end of the feeding trial. Compared to the FM diet, there were no significant differences in weight gain, individual feed intake, specific growth rate or protein efficiency ratio (PER) of fish when 20% of the FM was replaced compared to fish fed the FM control diet. However, fish performance was reduced at higher levels of FM replacement, significantly so at the 60% replacement level. Hematological parameters were similar among the treatments. Fish fed the 60% SBM diet had significantly lower lipid levels than fish fed the other diets. There was no significant difference in survival of fish fed the different diets. A second order polynomial regression revealed maximum growth of the spotted rose snapper fed up to 19.4% SBM inclusion. The results of this study show that SBM is an acceptable ingredient to supply 20% of protein in spotted rose snapper diets, but that higher dietary levels reduce fish performance. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Hernandez C.,Food Research And Development Center Ac | Gonzalez-Santos A.,Food Research And Development Center Ac | Valverde-Romero M.,Food Research And Development Center Ac | Gonzalez-Rodriguez B.,Food Research And Development Center Ac | Dominguez-Jimenez P.,Food Research And Development Center Ac
Latin American Journal of Aquatic Research | Year: 2016

A 120 days feeding trial was conducted to evaluate diets in which fish meal (FM) was replaced with meat and bone meal (MBM) or tuna byproduct meal (TBM) on growth performance, apparent digestibility and hematological parameters of juvenile spotted rose snapper (SRS) L. guttatus. Three isonitrogenous compounds (47.6-49.0%) and isoenergetic (20.9-22.9 kJ g-1) diets were formulated. A control diet contained FM as a main protein source (D-FM) and two diets with 35% of fish meal protein replaced by MBM or TBM protein (D-MBM, D-TBM). Each diet was fed to triplicate groups of 20 SRS juvenile (initial weight 8.2 ± 0.02 g) to apparent satiation three times a day. Growth performance, hematological parameters and apparent digestibility of SRS fed D-MBM or D-TBM diets were not significantly different from D-FM diet. However, the whole body crude protein was significantly higher in D-MBM group than D-TBM group, and the values were comparable to D-FM group. Based on these results, the meat and bone meal is an economical and viable option, as tuna byproduct meal in practical diets for juvenile spotted rose snapper. © 2016, Escuela de Ciencias del Mar. All rights reserved.


Hernandez C.,Food Research And Development Center Ac | Osuna-Osuna L.,Food Research And Development Center Ac | Hernandez A.B.,Food Research And Development Center Ac | Sanchez-Gutierrez Y.,Food Research And Development Center Ac | And 2 more authors.
Latin American Journal of Aquatic Research | Year: 2014

The feasibility of replacing fish meal protein at different levels with poultry by product meal food grade (PBM-FG) was assessed in diets for spotted rose snapper Lutjanus guttatus. Four diets were formulated, the control diet fish meal was used as the main protein source (FM); the other three diets had increasing levels of PBM-FG replacing 25, 50 or 75% of the fish meal protein respectively. The diets were fed close to apparent satiation, three times a day to quadruplicate groups of juvenile snapper (average body weight 11.0 ± 0.04 g). The fish were randomly distributed into groups of 15 fish in a 120 L seawater tank. The response of snapper to diets containing graded levels of fish meal was evaluated by measuring weight gain, feed efficiency, body composition, hematological parameters and apparent nutrient digestibility during a 12-week period. The replacing of the 25% of fish meal protein by PBM-FG did show a similar trend for feed efficiency and growth performance than control diet. Feed efficiency and growth performance was reduced at 75% level of fish meal protein replacement by PBM-FG, due to deficiencies of lysine and methionine. The final whole-body proximate composition did not differ among treatments. The hematological characteristics were similar among the treatments control, 25 and 50%, but the fish fed PBM-FG 75% showed the lowest levels for total protein and glucose parameters. The dietary dry matter and protein apparent digestibility coefficients (ADCs) decreased with increasing dietary PBM-FG. High values for lipid ADCs were observed in all diets.

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