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Fang R.-S.,Zhejiang University | Dong Y.-C.,Zhejiang University | Xu T.-Y.,Zhejiang University | He G.-Q.,Zhejiang University | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2013

Summary: Ethyl carbamate (EC) is a potential carcinogenic compound present in most of the fermented foods. In this work, EC was inhibited through different strategies during vinification of Chinese yellow rice wine. EC can be inhibited by the use of ornithine in contrast to the control at peak point. However, the utilisation of urease resulted in little inhibitive effect on EC. The comparative data of intracellular ornithine transcarbamylase (OTCase) and arginine deiminase (ADI) among four experiments showed that EC was positively regulated by intracellular OTCase, but ADI was not determined. Extracellular urea and citrulline content was significantly increased by adding ornithine (P < 0.05), whereas ethanol played a minor role in EC formation. The correlation analysis between EC and OTCase or urea revealed a linear association (correlation coefficients above 0.8). These findings suggested that OTCase may be a required factor regulating EC formation during the brewing of Chinese yellow rice wine. © 2013 Institute of Food Science and Technology. Source


Fang R.-S.,Zhejiang University | Fang R.-S.,Food Microbiology Research Key Laboratory of Zhejiang Province | Dong Y.-C.,Zhejiang University | Dong Y.-C.,Food Microbiology Research Key Laboratory of Zhejiang Province | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2015

Summary: Ethyl carbamate (EC) is a probable carcinogen existing in most fermented foods. Throughout traditional fermentation processes, the Chinese fermentation starter plays an important role, but it contains varieties of microorganisms which make inhibiting EC efficiently become a challenge. Therefore, the traditional fermentation starter is substituted with a single yeast strain (Saccharomyces cerevisiae ZJU) to regulate EC catabolism. In this work, S. cerevisiae ZJU can reduce EC formation and the data of EC concentration show that there is 85.6% reduction of EC at most using S. cerevisiae ZJU instead of the traditional fermentation starter. Extracellular urea and citrulline were the leading precursors of EC. The content of amino acids and volatile flavour compounds in the experimental group has no significant influence compared to the natural fermentation. The findings in this work suggest that EC can be regulated by means of the fermentation starters variation. © 2014 Institute of Food Science and Technology. Source


Zhang J.,Zhejiang University | Zhang J.,Food Microbiology Research Key Laboratory of Zhejiang Province | Dong Y.-C.,Zhejiang University | Dong Y.-C.,Food Microbiology Research Key Laboratory of Zhejiang Province | And 6 more authors.
Carbohydrate Polymers | Year: 2014

The effect of culture medium compositions on gellan gum production produced by fermentation with ahalobacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis QHZJUJW CGMCC2428 was studied. In this work, a fractionalfactorial design was applied to investigate the main factors that affected gellan gum production by S.paucimobilis QHZJUJW CGMCC2428. Sucrose was the best carbon source for gellan gum and peptone dis-played better inducing effect. Central composite design and response surface methodology were adoptedto derive a statistical model for optimizing submerged culture medium composition. These experimen-tal results showed that the optimum culture medium for producing gellan gum was composed of 40.00(w/v) sucrose, 3.00% peptone (w/v), MgSO4(w/v), 9.20% KH2PO4 (w/v), 7.50% Na2HPO4 (w/v), 4.30% K2SO4 (w/v), pH 6.8-7.0. The maximal gellan gum was 19.89 ± 0.68 g/L, which was agreed closely with the pred-icated value (20.12 g/L). After incubated for 72 h under the optimized culture medium in 5-L bioreactor,the gellan gum fermentation reached about 19.90 ± 0.68 g/L, which was higher than that in the initialcultivation medium. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source

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