Food Innovation Center

Oregon City, OR, United States

Food Innovation Center

Oregon City, OR, United States

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News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.thefishsite.com

Sashimi derived from yellowtail fed a diet containing a novel fishmeal replacement has passed a consumer taste test with flying colours. The trial was conducted by KnipBio, a Massachusetts-based biotechnology company, along with its collaborator Kampachi Farms, and involved samples of yellowtail (Seriola rivoliana) that had been fed diets containing up to 7.5% of the microbe-derived KnipBio Meal (KBM). The trial was conducted at the Food Innovation Center at Oregon State University. Dr Larry Feinberg, CEO of KnipBio, explained: “As we move forward in our efforts to develop KBM into a premium substitute for fishmeal, it’s vitally important that fish raised on a diet containing KnipBio Meal have the same taste and texture profile as their counterparts fed fishmeal-based diets. To ensure this is indeed the case we devised the most rigorous test we could – a side-by-side comparison of Cabo Kampachi sashimi.” The scientists at Oregon State’s Food Innovation Center recruited more than 70 adults who regularly eat sashimi to be the subjects. A triangular test methodology was used, where each subject was given a plate containing two pieces of Cabo Kampachi sashimi from fish raised on KnipBio Meal, and a control sashimi piece that had been fed a standard diet. The testers were asked to identify which piece was different in terms of taste, colour, and texture. The results indicated that the group was statistically unable to discern any difference between the KBM-fed samples and the control fishmeal-fed sample. Feinberg added: “With premium sashimi, there’s no hiding even small differences in taste or texture. These exciting results therefore make us confident that KBM can serve as a suitable replacement for fishmeal. Ensuring KBM-fed fish taste superb is, of course, just one of the challenges we are addressing as we continue our program to bring KnipBio Meal to market. We are advancing our process scale-up efforts, and are currently working with industrial partners to prove-out our fermentation technology at near-commercial scale. Separately, we are conducting numerous live feeding experiments to demonstrate a diet containing KnipBio Meal has a positive effect on fish population health and mortality. The results of these experiments to date have been highly encouraging and we are expanding them to include additional species. Lastly, we are initiating efforts to receive regulatory approval of our feeds.” KnipBio is focused on helping solve the protein needs of the world’s growing population. Feinberg stated: “We believe aquaculture offers the best means to achieve this goal because fish are extraordinarily efficient at converting feed into protein. The aquaculture industry is expected to double to over $200 billion by 2030, when two-thirds of all fish will be farm-raised. There is a significant roadblock to achieving this – the lack of sustainable and healthy proteins and oils to feed the fish. Traditionally the source has been fishmeal made from anchovies and other wild forage fish, but their populations are already stressed from heavy fishing pressure. To overcome this bottleneck, we have pioneered a process to use microbes to convert sustainable and abundant feed stocks into high-quality and affordable fishmeal substitute.”


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Media Contact Elizabeth Lyons Director of Career and Continuing Education alyons(at)kvcc(dot)edu or 269.353.1289 Mushroom Cultivation Class Begins in April at the Food Innovation Center Area gardeners, farmers and mushroom lovers are invited to take a new mushroom cultivation class at Kalamazoo Valley's Food Innovation Center. Mushroom Cultivation: Level 1 is a non-credit course offered by Kalamazoo Valley Community College on Wednesday evenings from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. April 12 to May 31. Participants will explore mushroom cultivation in different growing environments, indoor and out, maintained at the FIC urban farm. "The course will ready the myco-curious for home production of a variety of gourmet mushroom species," said instructor Lee Arbogast. "The course is also designed to ready farmers to add mushrooms to their marketable offerings." Participants will experience a range of discussion and actions crafted to understand basic mushroom biology, good lab and grow room practices, identification of all the common domestic edibles and a working knowledge of how to fit mushroom production into our lives and farms. "Weekly hands-on learning will help overcome the intimidation many of us have with fungi (even the friendly ones)," Arbogast said. "At the end of the course, students will be able to begin home growing oyster, shiitake, maitake, lionsmane, reishi, button mushrooms and be on their way to trying anything mycelial." Arbogast is a Live Edge Grower and FIC instructor who has integrated mushroom cultivation into his organic farm ecology. He is backed by the resources and institutional wisdom of the staff, library and young farm that is the Food Innovation Center. This winter, mycoculture was added to the winter crops curriculum bringing some mystery and excitement to the culinary students taking the class. Ongoing student projects will provide demonstration mushroom cultivation practices in fruit from the start of the course. No waiting to see how it all turns out! Students will take home successfully incubated projects to fruit in their home environments. Most of the mushrooms grown in class will be available to sample and try out on mycoskeptics at home. This course is also designed as a primer to becoming a certified Michigan Mushroom Identifier and will prepare the student on the basics of biology and identification. The Food Innovation Center is located at 224 E. Crosstown Parkway, Kalamazoo, MI. There is a $140 fee for the course, which includes materials. To register, go to http://www.kvcc.edu/trainingschedule.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The April 7-8 Kalamazoo Foodways Symposium is a free community event held at the Kalamazoo Valley Museum and the Bronson Healthy Living Campus of Kalamazoo Valley Community College, offering programs and activities that provide historical, cultural, and practical insights into food and food systems in Southwest Michigan. It serves as a convening point for students, practitioners, and the community to come together to build a strong, vibrant local food system. Cooking demonstrations, children's activities, and a keynote address by food writer and community activist Toni Tipton-Martin, author of The Jemima Code, are all features of the weekend's events. “We’ve been working with a number of community groups over the past year to plan this event,” said Elspeth Inglis, event co-organizer and aAssistant dDirector for eEducation at the Kalamazoo Valley Museum. “We all believe that it is important for the community to understand more about where our food comes from and about the social and political implications of a food system.” FRIDAY, APRIL 7, 2017 Pancake breakfast, 8 to 10 a.m. at the Havirmill Café in the Culinary and Allied Health Building, 418 E. WalnutThe Kalamazoo Valley Community College Foundation invites the public to a pancake breakfast to benefit student scholarships. $10 suggested donation. Prospective student information sessions, 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Culinary and Allied Health Building. Learn about Kalamazoo Valley’s Culinary Arts and Sustainable Food Systems programs. Join faculty and staff to learn about course offerings and take a tour of the facilities. For more information, contact Megan Pauken, mpauken(at)kvcc.edu. Good Food Kalamazoo working groups, 9 - 10:15 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. - 12 p.m., at the Culinary and Allied Health Building. Join community organizations, students, and others to discuss current programs and opportunities in Kalamazoo’s food systems. Topics will include: ● Institution (school/hospital) food service ● Food business development ● Scaling up for small farms ● Campus farm programs ● Starting an incubator farm in our community ● Youth job/skills training programs Lunch at Bronson Hospital cafeteria, noon to 1 p.m. Executive Chef Jason McClellan has created a special local menu that features some of our favorite farms’ foods. Enjoy lunch in the hospital cafeteria (for purchase). Vegetarian/vegan options will be available. Good Food Kalamazoo Summit, 1:15 - 2:45 p.m., at the Culinary and Allied Health Building. Panel Discussion, 3 - 4:30 p.m. at the Culinary and Allied Health Building. The topic will be, “What can historical foodways teach us about how to create a sustainable and equitable food system for today and the future?” Panelists will be Toni Tipton-Martin, food writer and community activist, Punkin Shenanaquet from the Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians, and Roger Ulrich, co-founder of Lake Village Homestead. Art Hop reception, 5 - 7 p.m.at the Kalamazoo Valley Museum, 230 North Rose Street. Toni Tipton-Martin’s keynote address on food heritage and good health begins at 6 p.m. The reception features traditional African and African American foods, an art exhibit, "Food Not Food" photography by local artist Kristina Lechner, and seedling and recipe giveaways with youth from the Kalamazoo Empowering Youth (KEYS) program. Representatives from Kazoo Books will be on hand to sell copies of Ms. Tipton-Martin's book, The Jemima Code and she will be available to sign her book. SATURDAY, APRIL 8 Hands-On Kids Activities Join Kalamazoo Valley Museum staff and friends for hands-on activities including “Name the Veggie,” “MyPlate” decorating, and live farm animals, 1 - 4 p.m. at the Culinary and Allied Health Building Lobby/Cafe and Food Innovation Center. Hands-On Cooking Classes at the Culinary and Allied Health Building. Pre-registration is required. Contact Elizabeth Barker at 373-7965 to register. Try a free sampler version of one of our community cooking classes: Healthy Cooking in the Kitchen: Manage your blood sugar - a chef and a dietitian team up to share nutrition tips and real recipes for keeping your blood sugar in check and feeling great. 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. and 2 - 3 p.m. at the Culinary and Allied Health Building. Families welcome. No children under 6; children ages 6-17 must be accompanied by an adult. Kids Cooking! This class is just for kids. Learn to make “Friendship Salsa” and other easy, healthy snacks, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. and 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. at the Culinary and Allied Health Building’s community kitchen. Intended for children ages 8-13; no children under 6. SHOP, COOK, EAT: Farmers Market Tour + How to Cook Affordably and In-Season Join People’s Food Co-op Market Manager Gaby Gerken and MSU Extension Community Food Systems Educator Mariel Borgman for a morning of local food fun. Tour the Kalamazoo Winter Farmers Market and learn how to use SNAP and other food assistance benefits to affordably purchase food at farmers markets. Then gather in the Community Kitchen for a demonstration of techniques to cook easy, versatile, and affordable meals using whatever produce is in season. Families welcome. No children under 6; children ages 6-17 must be accompanied by an adult. 9:30 - 11:30 a.m. Meet at CAH lobby. Cooking Demonstrations, 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. and 1 - 2:30 p.m. at the Culinary and Allied Health Building. Toni Tipton-Martin will cook African heritage recipes in the Culinary Theater. There will be samples. Vegan Kalamazoo chefs will cook vegan recipes that are tasty, sustainable, and nutritious, 3 - 4 p.m. Community Conversations and Workshops, 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. (individual sessions will last 45-60 minutes) at the Culinary and Allied Health Building. Join community organizations and educators for short workshops on various topics of interest in the food system! Topics will include: Events are listed in order of start time, but also contain TOPIC KEYWORDS so you can seek out the events you are most interested in. CAH is the Culinary and Allied Health Building, 418 E Walnut St. FIC is the Food Innovation Center, 224 E Crosstown Parkway Workshop: Campus Farms Time: 10:45 a.m. - noon Location: CAH 207 Presenter/Facilitator: Mimi Strauss, marian.strauss13(at)kzoo.edu. Students and staff from Kalamazoo College, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo Valley Community College, Grand Valley State University, and University of Michigan will discuss their on-campus farms and how they enhance the educational experience for students at these schools, which aren’t traditionally agricultural schools. Topics: EDUCATION, FARMING, LOCAL INITIATIVES Info Session: Kalamazoo Valley’s Culinary Arts and Sustainable Food Systems Programs Time: 11 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Location: CAH 223 Presenter/Facilitator: John Korycki, Director for Culinary Education, jkorycki(at)kvcc.edu. Learn about Kalamazoo Valley’s newest degree program and take a building tour. Topics: EDUCATION, CULINARY ARTS, BUILDING TOUR Workshop: Are you ready to be a beekeeper? Time: 12-12:50 p.m. Location: FIC 113 Presenter: Shaana Way, Kalamazoo Bee Club Have you thought about keeping bees? Shaana will help you decide if it’s the right pastime for you, explaining what you’ll need to get started, in terms of costs, time, equipment, and expectations. This session is also great for beginning beekeepers, and includes a visit to Kalamazoo Valley’s apiary. Community Conversation: African American Food Traditions Time: 12:15-1:05 p.m. and 3-4 p.m. Location: CAH 223 Presenter/Facilitator: Donna Odom, SHARE The Society for History and Racial Equity (SHARE) will feature a display of vintage cookbooks and lead a conversation with local African American queens of cuisine. SHARE will be selling copies of recipes collected from local African American cooks. Topics: LOCAL INITIATIVES, HISTORY/CULTURE, FOOD JUSTICE, CUISINES Workshop: Veganism - the universal foodway Time: 12:15-1:05 p.m. Location: CAH 247 Presenter/Facilitator: Hillary Rettig, Vegan Kalamazoo, vegankalamazoo(at)gmail.com. All the world loves rice and beans! In this talk, Vegan Kalamazoo's Hillary Rettig takes us on a journey through the many vegan staples and foodways from around the world. We'll also time-travel back to humanity's mostly-vegan past, and forward to its ever-more-vegan future, so please join us for what promises to be a fascinating and far-reaching discussion. Topics: LOCAL INITIATIVES, HEALTH, CUISINES Workshop: Mushroom Cultivation Time 1-1:50 p.m. Location: FIC 113 Presenter/Facilitator: Lee Arbogast Curious about growing your own mushrooms? This mini-workshop is a preview of the upcoming eight-week Mushroom Cultivation course that starts on April 13 at the Food Innovation Center. Experienced farmer Lee Arbogast will take you through the basics of a few different types of mushroom production. Topics: GROW YOUR OWN Workshop: Do you have the GUTS to be healthy? Time: 1-1:50 p.m. Location: CAH 207 Presenter/Facilitator: Nancy Lee Bently, Wholistic Health Expert, fullcirclesc(at)gmail.com. Wholistic Health Expert, Nancy Lee Bentley calls it like-it-is about the state of our food and health today. With trademark wit and wisdom she counsels “It’s not hopeless, though we do have some challenges before us. But let’s face it, it literally take GUTS – a Healthy GI Tract, conscious lifestyle choices and like-minded community to really be healthy these days. Together, We can do it.” Nancy Lee Bentley is a dynamic Wholistic Health Expert, Local Foodsystems Specialist, speaker and author of Truly Cultured and Dr. Mercola’s Total Health Program. For over 35 years Nancy has been a pioneering champion for healthy food, local foodsystems and holistic health, including being UIUC’s first Foodsystems Development Specialist, organizing food coops and CSA’s, founding the Organic Trade Association, baking Prince’s purple-topped birthday cake and developing wheat-free recipes for celebrities like Cher. Topics: CUISINES, HEALTH Film Screening: Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret Time: 1:15-2:45 p.m. Location: CAH 247 Presenter/Facilitator: Hillary Rettig and Joe Smigiel, Vegan Kalamazoo, vegankalamazoo(at)gmail.com. Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret is a groundbreaking feature-length environmental documentary following intrepid filmmaker Kip Andersen as he uncovers the most destructive industry facing the planet today – and investigates why the world’s leading environmental organizations are too afraid to talk about it. Community Conversation: Food Justice in Kalamazoo Time: 1:30-2:45 p.m. Location: CAH 223 Presenter/Facilitator: PFC Transformation Team, pfc-transformation-team(at)googlegroups.com The Transformation Team at PFC Natural Grocery and Deli has been working for several years to address racism and promote food justice in Kalamazoo. This participatory panel discussion will highlight successes and challenges and next steps for our community to take together. Workshop: Growing Hops in the Home Garden Time: 2-2:50 p.m. Location: FIC 113 Presenter: Bonnie Steinman, formerly HopHead Farms Hops are a versatile and useful plant in the home garden. Whether you are a homebrewer looking to grow some of your own ingredients, or just a gardener interested in attractive perennial plants, come learn the basics of cultivation from an experienced grower. Workshop: Starting a Spring Vegetable Garden Time: 3-3:50 p.m. Location: CAH 207 Presenter: Tammy March-Vispi, Kalamazoo County Master Gardener Volunteers Are you ready to try growing your own food? This session is for beginning vegetable gardeners. Learn the basics of starting your own garden and you’ll be eating your own delicious harvests this summer! Tammy March-Vispi is a Master Gardener Volunteer and farmer who operates a CSA in Allegan County. Community Conversation: Kalamazoo’s African-American Community Heritage Recipes Time: 12:15-1:05 p.m. and 3-4 p.m. Location: CAH 223 Presenter/Facilitator: Donna Odom, SHARE The Society for History and Racial Equity (SHARE) will feature a display of vintage cookbooks and lead a conversation with local African American queens of cuisine. SHARE will be selling copies of recipes collected from local African American cooks. Topics: LOCAL INITIATIVES, HISTORY/CULTURE, FOOD JUSTICE, CUISINES Info Session: ValleyHub, Kalamazoo’s new regional Food Hub! Time: 3-3:45 p.m. Location: FIC 113 Presenter: Rachel Bair, Director for Sustainable and Innovative Food Systems, rbair(at)kvcc.edu. What’s going on at the Kalamazoo Valley Food Innovation Center, that crazy barn-like building with the greenhouse right near downtown? FIC Director Rachel Bair will explain what we’re up to - operating a farm and food hub right here in the city - and share ways that you can get involved. For an updated schedule, see the Kalamazoo Foodways Symposium web page at http://www.kalamazoomuseum.org/kalamazoofoodways.


Van Der Maarel M.J.E.C.,Food Innovation Center | Van Der Maarel M.J.E.C.,University of Groningen | Leemhuis H.,University of Groningen
Carbohydrate Polymers | Year: 2013

Starch is an agricultural raw material used in many food and industrial products. It is present in granules that vary in shape in the form of amylose and amylopectin. Starch-degrading enzymes are used on a large scale in the production of sweeteners (high fructose corn syrup) and concentrated glucose syrups as substrate for the fermentative production of bioethanol and basic chemicals. Over the last two decades α-glucanotransferases (EC 2.4.1.xx), such as branching enzyme (EC 2.4.1.18) and 4-α-glucanotransferase (EC 2.4.1.25), have received considerable attention. These enzymes do not hydrolyze the starch as amylases do. Instead, α-glucanotransferases remodel parts of the amylose and amylopectin molecules by cleaving and reforming α-1,4- and α-1,6-glycosidic bond. Here we review the properties of α-glucanotransferases and discuss the emerging use of these enzymes in the generation of novel starch derivatives. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Those who eat more fish, plant proteins less likely to suffer, study finds COLUMBUS, Ohio - Eating a Mediterranean diet could decrease the chances an overweight person will experience regular pain, new research suggests. A well-established connection between body weight and chronic pain might be explained by inflammation in the body, and the study points to anti-inflammatory foods including fish, nuts and beans as a key to preventing or reducing that pain, said lead researcher Charles Emery, a professor of psychology at The Ohio State University. "We found that a healthy diet explained the link between weight and pain and specifically that seafood and plant proteins such as peas and nuts and beans were key," said Emery, who is a member of Ohio State's Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research. "It appears to be telling us that it's not just the quantity of the food you eat that plays a role in pain for heavier individuals, but the quality of food as well." The researchers developed a model to help them determine whether components of an anti-inflammatory diet high in fruits and vegetables, whole grains and healthy fats, played a role in the likelihood a person's weight would contribute to pain. And they found a clear pattern. Eating more fish and plant-based proteins such as nuts and beans was linked with less pain, regardless of body weight. The study also upheld previous research showing that people who are overweight or obese are more likely to experience pain. It included 98 men and women 20 to 78 years old and appears this month in the journal Pain. "Obesity and pain are significant public health problems. This was an attempt to take a very detailed snapshot of how they might be related," Emery said. "We were interested in the possibility of an inflammatory mechanism explaining the connection because we know there's a high degree of inflammation associated with obesity and with pain." The mediation model he and his team developed took into account weight, an analysis of self-reported dietary patterns (the Health Eating Index, a measure of diet quality based on U.S. dietary guidelines) and results of a two-question pain survey. Researchers spent three hours with each participant in his or her home. The researchers accounted for other factors that could influence their results, including age, depression, analgesic medication use and joint pain. And they tested the model using three different measures of weight - body mass index, waist circumference and body fat percentage. In all three cases, they found evidence that anti-inflammatory proteins may explain the link between increased weight and pain. "For people with obesity, it's kind of like a cloud hanging over them because they experience high levels of pain and inflammation," Emery said. The data came from a larger initial study that examined the home environment's role on psychological and social functioning of obese people and people at a healthy weight. Potential weaknesses of the study include the lack of blood samples that would allow the researchers to look at inflammatory markers and the brevity of the pain measurement. The pain evaluation provides an indicator of pain experienced during the previous month, but does not account for chronic pain of a longer duration. Emery said his next step is to examine body fat and pain using biomarkers associated with inflammation. "I'm interested in how our work can contribute to effective treatments for overweight and obese individuals," he said. Emery's collaborators, all from Ohio State, were KayLoni Olson, Andrew Bodine, Victoria Lee and Diane Habash. The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences and Ohio State's Food Innovation Center supported the study.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Eating a Mediterranean diet could decrease the chances an overweight person will experience regular pain, new research suggests. A well-established connection between body weight and chronic pain might be explained by inflammation in the body, and the study points to anti-inflammatory foods including fish, nuts and beans as a key to preventing or reducing that pain, said lead researcher Charles Emery, a professor of psychology at The Ohio State University. “We found that a healthy diet explained the link between weight and pain and specifically that seafood and plant proteins such as peas and nuts and beans were key,” said Emery, who is a member of Ohio State’s Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research. “It appears to be telling us that it’s not just the quantity of the food you eat that plays a role in pain for heavier individuals, but the quality of food as well.” The researchers developed a model to help them determine whether components of an anti-inflammatory diet high in fruits and vegetables, whole grains and healthy fats, played a role in the likelihood a person’s weight would contribute to pain. And they found a clear pattern. Eating more fish and plant-based proteins such as nuts and beans was linked with less pain, regardless of body weight. The study also upheld previous research showing that people who are overweight or obese are more likely to experience pain. It included 98 men and women 20 to 78 years old and appears this month in the journal Pain. “Obesity and pain are significant public health problems. This was an attempt to take a very detailed snapshot of how they might be related,” Emery said. “We were interested in the possibility of an inflammatory mechanism explaining the connection because we know there’s a high degree of inflammation associated with obesity and with pain.” The mediation model he and his team developed took into account weight, an analysis of self-reported dietary patterns (the Health Eating Index, a measure of diet quality based on U.S. dietary guidelines) and results of a two-question pain survey. Researchers spent three hours with each participant in his or her home. The researchers accounted for other factors that could influence their results, including age, depression, analgesic medication use and joint pain. And they tested the model using three different measures of weight – body mass index, waist circumference and body fat percentage. In all three cases, they found evidence that anti-inflammatory proteins may explain the link between increased weight and pain. “For people with obesity, it’s kind of like a cloud hanging over them because they experience high levels of pain and inflammation,” Emery said. The data came from a larger initial study that examined the home environment’s role on psychological and social functioning of obese people and people at a healthy weight. Potential weaknesses of the study include the lack of blood samples that would allow the researchers to look at inflammatory markers and the brevity of the pain measurement. The pain evaluation provides an indicator of pain experienced during the previous month, but does not account for chronic pain of a longer duration. Emery said his next step is to examine body fat and pain using biomarkers associated with inflammation. “I’m interested in how our work can contribute to effective treatments for overweight and obese individuals,” he said. Emery’s collaborators, all from Ohio State, were KayLoni Olson, Andrew Bodine, Victoria Lee and Diane Habash. The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences and Ohio State’s Food Innovation Center supported the study.


News Article | January 11, 2016
Site: www.fastcompany.com

At Imperial Restaurant in Portland, Oregon, diners are getting a taste of the latest superfood to hit the market: dulse, a crimson seaweed that’s packed with nutrients and, when fried, offers up an umami flavor similar to bacon. "It disappears in your mouth," says chef and owner Vitaly Paley. Wild dulse, which is sold as a specialty item at places like Whole Foods, grows primarily on the shores of Ireland and the north Atlantic coast and is notoriously difficult to harvest: It’s plucked by hand and can deteriorate quickly. But the dulse that Paley sprinkles atop his tuna poke doesn’t come from the ocean—it’s farmed in 6,000-liter tanks at Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center. Marine biologist Chris Langdon began cultivating this strain of dulse as a food for abalone in the mid-1990s, but it wasn’t until his colleague Chuck Toombs, from the OSU College of Business, toured the lab in 2014 that Langdon considered serving it to humans. With wild dulse selling for up to $90 a pound and sales of seaweed snacks in the U.S. accounting for roughly $500 million in 2014, Toombs sensed that Langdon might be sitting on a gold mine. Never before has dulse been cultivated outside of the ocean on a commercial scale. Plus, Langdon’s strain grows fast—really fast. "Under optimum conditions, it will double or triple its weight each week," he says. While OSU’s Food Innovation Center tests commercial preparations for dulse, Langdon’s strain is already being served at select restaurants in Oregon, and Northwest grocery chain New Seasons recently debuted a soy-and-ginger dulse dressing. This year, Toombs plans to hit the market with snacks like dulse crackers and a smoked peanut popcorn brittle through his new business, DulsEnergy. Though Langdon and his colleagues are ramping up production, demand is still outpacing supply. "Our lawyers said, ‘We’ve never heard of anything like this. You guys have a market and you don’t have a product!’ " says Toombs. For the producers, at least, it’s a good problem to have. A version of this article appeared in the February 2016 issue of Fast Company magazine.


Zhao J.,Wageningen University | Zhao J.,Jiangnan University | Schols H.A.,Wageningen University | Chen Z.,Food Innovation Center | And 3 more authors.
Food Chemistry | Year: 2012

Revealing the substituents distribution within starch can help to understand the changes of starch properties after modification. The distribution of substituents over cross-linked and hydroxypropylated sweet potato starch was investigated and compared with modified potato starch. The starches were cross-linked with sodium trimetaphosphate and/or hydroxypropylated with propylene oxide. The native and modified starches were gelatinized and hydrolysed by pullulanase, β-amylase, α-amylase and a combination of pullulanase, α-amylase and amyloglucosidase. The hydrolysates were analysed by HPSEC, HPAEC and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Cross-linking had only a slight effect on the enzymatic hydrolysis, where hydroxypropylation evidently limited the enzymatic hydrolysis. The results obtained suggest that the hydroxypropyl substituents are not distributed regularly over the starch chains. Although the average substitution was around 2 hydroxypropyl groups per 10 glucose units, in the enzyme digests of hydroxypropylated starches, oligomer fragments of 10-15 glucose units, carrying 5-8 hydroxypropyl groups, were identified. It is hypothesised that higher levels of substituents are present in the amorphous regions and periphery of clusters of starch granules. This is the first time that the location of hydroxypropyl groups within sweet potato starch has been examined in this detail. Despite significant differences in granule architecture between starches from potato and sweet potato, similar patterns of hydroxypropylation have been found. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Flatev, a startup company that plans to revolutionize the way consumers prepare a wide variety of flatbreads will be establishing its first worldwide manufacturing operation at the Rutgers Food Innovation Center business incubator facility in Bridgeton, NJ. The company, headquartered in Zurich, Switzerland, met with officials from Choose New Jersey, Inc., the Rutgers Food Innovation Center, and other business leaders today, and demonstrated their Flatev Artisan Baking System. The system gives consumers the ability to produce freshly baked, tasty, and nutritious artisanal flatbreads with the push of a button. The Flatev Artisan Baking System is a table-top household appliance that makes fresh tortillas, pita, roti, and other flatbreads, as well as cookies, with a single-serve dough portion, that is as consistent and easy-to-use as a single-serve coffee maker. The Flatev dough single-serves will be produced at the Rutgers Food Innovation Center during the fall of 2017. The appliance and single-serves will be sold to a limited number of service hotels, offices, and to consumers shortly thereafter. “The business began as a result of my interest in producing authentic, healthy tortillas, just like my mother made for me when I was a child growing up in Mexico,” said Carlos Ruiz, Founder, CEO and Chairman of Flatev. “Our Artisan Baking System produces organic, all natural tortillas and flatbreads, which are non-GMO and contain no artificial preservatives or additives. The hot just-baked tortillas, which are ready in less than two minutes, are scrumptious, fresh, and carry an amazing aroma.” Flatev raised almost $5 million in its initial round of funding, which has enabled the company to complete all of its appliance engineering and dough product development, finalize its prototypes, gain patents on its process, and build a team in both Switzerland and the US. “We are very pleased that Flatev has chosen to establish their first global operation within our FDA and USDA inspected facility in Bridgeton, New Jersey,” said Lou Cooperhouse, Executive Director of the Rutgers Food Innovation Center. “There is a clear consumer trend in conveniently packaged products that are freshly prepared at home, and away from home, and Flatev is pioneering this trend in a category where freshness is extremely important. The global kitchen appliance market also is expected to grow significantly in the years ahead, and we believe that Flatev’s growth can be quite substantial in both retail and foodservice markets.” Choose New Jersey, a private non-profit organization charged with encouraging and nurturing economic growth throughout the State, provided assistance to Flatev to ensure a smooth move to New Jersey, including an introduction to the resources available to food companies at the Rutgers Food Innovation Center. “We welcome Flatev to New Jersey’s growing food industry,” said Michele Brown, President and CEO of Choose New Jersey, Inc. “New Jersey has powerful assets, including the resources at the Food Innovation Center, to help pioneering start-up companies like Flatev flourish. Their first-to-market baking system will be a welcome addition to the Garden State’s growing list of innovative food products.” Choose New Jersey, Inc. is a privately funded 501(c)(3) corporation charged with encouraging and nurturing economic growth throughout New Jersey with a focus on its urban centers. Through marketing, business attraction and lead generation activities, Choose New Jersey markets New Jersey as a premiere business location to both domestic and international businesses. Choose New Jersey is a member of the Partnership for Action (PFA), which is led by Lt. Governor Kim Guadagno and also includes the New Jersey Business Action Center, the New Jersey Economic Development Authority and the Office of the Secretary of Higher Education. For more information, visit http://www.choosenj.com. Rutgers Food Innovation Center (FIC) is a globally recognized food business incubation and economic development accelerator program of the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station (NJAES) at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. The Center provides extensive programs in training and workforce development; customized and comprehensive business and technical mentoring services; and USDA- and FDA-inspected facilities that enable design, development, analysis, commercialization and manufacture of value-added food products for sale to retail and foodservice markets. The FIC has been named as the “Incubator of the Year” by the International Business Innovation Association (InBIA) and recognized as an “Agricultural Innovation Center Demonstration Program” by the USDA. In addition, the FIC has been designated as a Soft Landings site by InBIA, due to its focus on international business attraction, and is currently the only food-based incubation program in the world with this designation. For more information about the Rutgers Food Innovation Center, visit http://foodinnovation.rutgers.edu/. More about Flatev can be found on its website at: http://www.flatev.com Photo Caption: (From L to R) Lou Cooperhouse, Executive Director, Rutgers Food Innovation Center and Michele Brown, President and CEO, Choose New Jersey, Inc. welcome Scott Cross, Chief Business Development Officer, Jonas Mueller, Co-Founder and Chief Technology Officer and Carlos Ruiz, Co-Founder, Chairman and CEO of Flatev to New Jersey.


Ratcliffe M.M.,Food Innovation Center | Ratcliffe M.M.,National Farm to School Networks Research Workgroup
Childhood Obesity | Year: 2012

Farm to School programs hold promise to address childhood obesity. These programs may increase students' access to healthier foods, increase students' knowledge of and desire to eat these foods, and increase their consumption of them. Implementing Farm to School programs requires the involvement of multiple people, including nutrition services, educators, and food producers. Because these groups have not traditionally worked together and each has different goals, it is important to demonstrate how Farm to School programs that are designed to decrease childhood obesity may also address others' objectives, such as academic achievement and economic development. A logic model is an effective tool to help articulate a shared vision for how Farm to School programs may work to accomplish multiple goals. Furthermore, there is evidence that programs based on theory are more likely to be effective at changing individuals' behaviors. Logic models based on theory may help to explain how a program works, aid in efficient and sustained implementation, and support the development of a coherent evaluation plan. This article presents a sample theory-based logic model for Farm to School programs. The presented logic model is informed by the Polytheoretical Model for Food and Garden-based Education in School Settings (PMFGBE). The logic model has been applied to multiple settings, including Farm to School program development and evaluation in urban and rural school districts. This article also includes a brief discussion on the development of the PMFGBE, a detailed explanation of how Farm to School programs may enhance the curricular, physical, and social learning environments of schools, and suggestions for the applicability of the logic model for practitioners, researchers, and policy makers. © 2012 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

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