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Bucher T.B.,Food Control Authority of the Canton Zurich | Fridez F.,Food Control Authority of the Canton Neuchatel | Koppel R.,Food Control Authority of the Canton Zurich
European Food Research and Technology | Year: 2014

Basmati rice has a higher trade value compared to other rice varieties. Adulterations of Basmati with cheaper varieties, sometimes in substantially amounts, are well known. To screen Basmati samples for such fraud, an efficient duplex real-time PCR assay was developed. It applies a mixed technique using hydrolysis probes in conjunction with Plexor™ technology. This assay is a cost-effective system to screen for non-Basmati contents in the range of 1 % or higher. It is cheaper and less time consuming than microsatellite analysis which is the conventional method applied, and comparing the two methods reveals good correlation. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Bucher T.B.,Food Control Authority of the Canton Zurich | Koppel R.,Food Control Authority of the Canton Zurich
European Food Research and Technology | Year: 2015

Due to its higher trade value, a broad range of adulterations of Basmati rice with cheaper rice varieties can be found on the market. A duplex digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) assay was developed to test rice samples, labeled as “Basmati,” for their authenticity. The new ddPCR assay is based on the real-time PCR (rtPCR) method published previously. It showed to be able to screen for non-Basmati rice contents in the range of 1 % or higher. As digital PCR does not require calibrators for the quantification, the method is more economic, compared to rtPCR or microsatellite analysis (MA). It is also less time-consuming than MA and an alternative method for the verification of rtPCR results. Comparing results gained by all three methods revealed best correlation between ddPCR and MA. © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg Source


Koppel R.,Food Control Authority of the Canton Zurich | Bucher T.B.,Food Control Authority of the Canton Zurich
European Food Research and Technology | Year: 2015

Many products claim to contain wasabi. Due to its high price, original wasabi (Eutrema wasabi) is often replaced by its cheaper close relative horseradish (Armoracia rusticana). To analyze such products, we developed a duplex real-time PCR method determining the DNA content of wasabi and horseradish, applying the ΔΔct-method. The developed horseradish-specific system turned out to be highly specific within the plant family Brassicaceae. We validated this duplex real-time PCR system and present results from common commercial products. The system proved to be reliable for uncovering fraudulent practices in the wasabi product group. © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg Source

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