Food Colour and Quality Laboratory

Sevilla, Spain

Food Colour and Quality Laboratory

Sevilla, Spain

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Melendez-Martinez A.J.,Tufts University | Melendez-Martinez A.J.,Food Colour and Quality Laboratory | Melendez-Martinez A.J.,University of Seville | Stinco C.M.,Food Colour and Quality Laboratory | And 2 more authors.
Food Chemistry | Year: 2013

Geometrical isomers of carotenoids behave differently in aspects like stability towards oxidants, bioavailability, vitamin A activity and specificity for enzymes. The availability of HPLC methods for their detailed profiling is therefore advisable to expand our knowledge on their metabolism and biological role. In this paper the development of a methodology to determine the highest number of geometrical isomers of major carotenoids in humans (phytoene, phytofluene, lutein, zeaxanthin, β-cryptoxanthin, α-carotene, β-carotene and lycopene) is described. To assess its usefulness with biological samples both postprandial human plasma and lung samples from ferrets were analysed. Up to 48 isomers of the main human carotenoids were separated in 62 min. This is to the best of our knowledge the report of the highest number of carotenoid geometrical isomers separated with a HPLC method. Twenty-six different carotenoid isomers were readily detected in the biological samples. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Hernandez-Hierro J.M.,University of Salamanca | Hernandez-Hierro J.M.,Food Colour and Quality Laboratory | Quijada-Morin N.,University of Salamanca | Martinez-Lapuente L.,University of La Rioja | And 4 more authors.
Food Chemistry | Year: 2014

The relationship between cell wall composition and extractability of anthocyanins from red grape skins was assessed in Tempranillo grape samples harvested at three stages of ripening (pre-harvest, harvest and over-ripening) and three different contents of soluble solids (22, 24 and 26 Brix) within each stage. Cell wall material was isolated and analysed in order to determine cellulose, lignin, non-cellulosic polysaccharides, protein, total polyphenols index and the degree of esterification of pectins. Results showed the influence of ripeness degree and contents of soluble solids on cell wall composition. Furthermore, principal components analysis was applied to the obtained data set in order to establish relationships between cell wall composition and extractability of anthocyanins. Total insoluble material exhibits the biggest opposition to anthocyanin extraction, while the highest amounts of cellulose, rhamnogalacturonans-II and polyphenols were positively correlated with anthocyanin extraction. Moreover, multiple linear regression was performed to assess the influence of the cell wall composition on the extraction of anthocyanin compounds. A model connecting cell wall composition and anthocyanin extractabilities was built, explaining 96.2% of the observed variability. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Melendez-Martinez A.J.,Food Colour and Quality Laboratory | Ayala F.,University of La Rioja | Echavarri J.F.,University of La Rioja | Negueruela A.I.,University of Zaragoza | And 4 more authors.
Food Chemistry | Year: 2011

We have devised a more sensible approach to estimate the carotenoid content of orange juices, which can be regarded as a model system of food with intricate carotenoid pattern. For this purpose spectroscopic information at several wavelengths and spectra of the juices and not from their carotenoid extracts were considered, such that more accurate and rapid quantitative assessments can be achieved. The wavelengths proposed on the basis of the characteristic vector method were 420, 455, 515, 545 and 610 nm or 420, 445, 510, 545 and 605 nm, depending on the measurement conditions. The correlations between the carotenoid content and the reflectances at these wavelengths were very good (R = 0.94 and 0.90, respectively). Additionally, it was demonstrated that the colour of the juices could be assessed with very good accuracy considering them. Due to its simplicity and rapidity, this method is intended to facilitate the quality control of the carotenoid content of foodstuffs in the industry and/or in the field. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Ferrer-Gallego R.,Grupo de Investigacion en Polifenoles | Hernandez-Hierro J.M.,Food Colour and Quality Laboratory | Rivas-Gonzalo J.C.,Grupo de Investigacion en Polifenoles | Escribano-Bailon M.T.,Grupo de Investigacion en Polifenoles
Journal of Food Engineering | Year: 2013

Grape seed and skin sensory parameters are important characteristics in making decisions concerning the optimal harvest time and producing high-quality red wines. The potential of near infrared spectroscopy to determine several sensory parameters of seeds and skins was evaluated. Taste (sourness), texture (astringency, tannic intensity, dryness and hardness), visual (colour) and olfactory (intensity and type of aroma) attributes were considered. Calibration models were performed by modified partial least squares regression. The differences between sensory analysis and NIRS analysis in external validation were lower in the case of seeds; they were between 4.5% for hardness and 8.7% for colour. For the skins, differences in external validation were between 9.8% for tannic intensity and 13.7% for astringency. The results obtained show that NIRS technology has considerable potential for predicting the above sensory attributes. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Nogales-Bueno J.,Food Colour and Quality Laboratory | Hernandez-Hierro J.M.,Food Colour and Quality Laboratory | Rodriguez-Pulido F.J.,Food Colour and Quality Laboratory | Heredia F.J.,Food Colour and Quality Laboratory
Food Chemistry | Year: 2014

Hyperspectral images of intact grapes during ripening were recorded using a near infrared hyperspectral imaging system (900-1700 nm). Spectral data have been correlated with grape skin total phenolic concentration, sugar concentration, titratable acidity and pH by modified partial least squares regression (MPLS) using a number of spectral pre-treatments and different sets of calibration. The obtained results (RSQ and SEP, respectively) for the global model of red and white grape samples were: 0.89 and 1.23 mg g-1 of grape skin for total phenolic concentration, 0.99 and 1.37 Brix for sugar concentration, 0.98 and 3.88 g L-1 for titratable acidity and for pH 0.94 and 0.12. Moreover, separate calibration models for red and white grape samples were also developed. The obtained results present a good potential for a fast and reasonably inexpensive screening of these parameters in intact grapes and therefore, for a fast control of technological and phenolic maturity. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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