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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Digi Smart Solutions help organizations comply with public health requirements and food safety regulations set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "With the wealth of our assets and expertise we have best-in-class products for local businesses as well as international enterprises. Our solutions span the entire chain of custody to help companies achieve operational efficiencies, complete visibility and verification of compliance," said Kevin C. Riley, Digi's chief operating officer who oversees the Smart Solutions group. "Additionally, as markets' needs continue to unfold, we'll be able to update our products to address those changes." A Tailored Solution for Each Industry Digi Smart Solutions address the day-to-day issues of maintaining product quality and safety while lowering costs and achieving overarching goals of higher customer satisfaction and brand reputation. They also address the needs of customers with unique challenges that span operational and safety regulatory requirements. Digi has established itself as a clear leader with more than 10,000 locations under management, a combined 25 years of temperature management experience and more than 1 billion temperature sensor readings. A sample of current customers includes Tim Hortons, Love's Travel Stops, Hennepin County Medical Center, Rite Aid Corporation, and the University of Notre Dame. The Digi Smart Solutions group has three primary areas: Foodservice: Products are designed to address the wide variety of environments in the foodservice industry including Quick Service Restaurants (QSR), full service restaurants, corporate dining, grocery stores, convenience stores and food service operations within other locations (i.e. movie theaters, rest stops, etc.). The system helps customers meet stringent task management, food safety and sanitation needs to securely capture, document, and report equipment and food temperatures to meet and exceed the U.S. FDA's Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) and Model Food Code. The solutions streamline manual operational checklists and provide insight to managers on how well their teams are adhering to quality and food safety guidelines. In educational settings (K-12, higher education), Digi Smart Solutions allow local and state agencies to document and streamline processes for schools participating in Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) Child Nutrition Programs. These programs require a food safety program based on Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles that conform to guidance issued by the USDA. The guidelines address all aspects of foodservice (receiving, storing, preparing, cooking, cooling, reheating, holding, assembling, packaging, transporting and serving). Transportation and Logistics: Products provide real-time and location-based temperature monitoring. Recent innovations in GPS and low power wireless sensing technology give customers complete visibility throughout the transport chain. As part of the FSMA, the FDA issued new food safety rules to prevent food contamination during transportation. Specific areas of FSMA compliance include transport asset sanitation and pre-cooling, temperature control and tracking, temperature certification and data exchange, and data retention. Digi Smart Solutions transportation products follow HACCP and National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) standards to provide a traceable independent audit of both reefer units and product temperatures. For more information, see "Digi International Introduces Digi SafeTemps for Transportation and Logistics." Healthcare and Pharmacy: Digi Smart Solutions for healthcare provides task management and real-time temperature monitoring solutions of critical items in pharmacy, hospital, blood bank and laboratory settings, including vaccines, medications, and other critical items. For pharmaceuticals, Digi Smart Solutions helps support the CDC Guidelines for Vaccine Storage (2016), along with the various Board of Pharmacy standards and Department of Health Vaccine For Children requirements. Digi Smart Solutions are comprised of easy-to-install hand-held probes, wireless sensors, gateways and easy-to-use software that allow temperature data and tasks to be monitored, logged, and retrieved. Additionally, the solutions offer an open API for integration into back-office systems. Digi Smart Solutions are available in a variety of subscription-based models for HACCP and NIST environments, and requires no capital expense. Hardware and software are included as part of the subscription with information hosted on servers managed by Digi. About Digi International  Digi International (NASDAQ: DGII) is a leading global provider of business and mission-critical machine-to-machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity products and services. We help our customers create next-generation connected products and deploy and manage critical communications infrastructures in demanding environments with high levels of security, relentless reliability and bulletproof performance. Founded in 1985, we've helped our customers connect over 100 million things, and growing. For more information, visit Digi's website at www.digi.com, or call 877-912-3444 (U.S.) or 952-912-3444 (International). To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/digi-international-cold-chain-solutions-relaunches-as-digi-smart-solutions-group-300451197.html


White A.H.,Food and Nutrition Service | Wilson J.F.,Food and Nutrition Service | Burns A.,Porter Novelli | Blum-Kemelor D.,Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior | Year: 2011

Objective: To develop and test nutrition messages and supporting content with low-income mothers for use with theory-based interventions addressing fruit and vegetable consumption and child-feeding practices. Design: Six formative and 6 evaluative focus groups explored message concepts and tested messages, respectively. Setting: Research facilities in Maryland, Texas, California, Florida, North Carolina, New York, Alabama, and Illinois. Participants: Ninety-five low-income mothers of 2- to 5-year-old children; over half from households participating in a federal nutrition assistance program. Phenomenon of Interest: Preference for and comprehension of nutrition messages. Analysis: Qualitative data analysis procedures to generate common themes from transcripts and observers' notes. Results: Messages on role modeling, cooking and eating together, having patience when introducing new food items, and allowing children to serve themselves were well received. Mothers preferred messages that emphasized their role as a teacher and noted benefits such as their children becoming more independent and learning new skills. Mothers commonly doubted children's ability to accurately report when they are " full" and disliked messages encouraging mothers to allow children to " decide" whether and how much to eat. Conclusions and Implications: This study generated 7 audience-tested messages for incorporation into nutrition education interventions targeting low-income mothers of preschool-age children. © 2011.


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CORVALLIS, Ore. - The Food Hero social marketing campaign is an effective way to help low-income families eat more nutritious meals through fast, tasty, affordable and healthy recipes, two new research studies from Oregon State University have found. Food Hero was launched by the OSU Extension Service in 2009 in an effort to encourage healthy eating among low-income Oregonians. The initiative includes several components, such as a website, http://www. , with information in both English and Spanish; Food Hero recipe taste-tasting events in schools and communities across Oregon; and a library of healthy recipes that have all been taste-tested and many approved by children. "The success of the program is by far exceeding the scope of what we envisioned when we started," said Melinda Manore, a professor of nutrition in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at OSU and co-author of the studies. "Getting people to change their diet and eating behavior, especially when they do not have much money, is very difficult, and this program is helping to do that." The social marketing program is led by Lauren Tobey of Extension Family and Community Health at OSU, and Tobey is lead author of the studies. Food Hero is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program - Education, or SNAP-Ed. SNAP-Ed focuses on obesity prevention within low-income households. One of the new studies, published in the journal Nutrients, explores how Food Hero was developed and tested. The goal of the program is to increase fruit and vegetable consumption among those eligible for SNAP benefits in Oregon, with a particular focus on low-income mothers. The campaign's strategy includes providing clearly focused messages, writing in plain language, being positive and realistic with the messaging, and offering simple tools for action that include an explanation of what to do and how to do it. The campaign has been effective in part because educators stayed focused on their target audience, the researchers said. The other study, published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, examines Food Hero's recipe project in more depth. The recipes used in the Food Hero campaign are formulated to be healthy, tasty and kid-friendly. To date, the Food Hero recipes have been accessed millions of times via the website and social media sites such as Pinterest. "All of the recipes are simple to make and cost-effective for families on tight budgets," Tobey said. "Many families can't afford to have a recipe fail or try an untested recipe the family may not end up liking." The recipes also are being tested with children who complete surveys or participate in a vote. If at least 70 percent of participating children say they "like the taste" of a recipe, it is considered "kid-approved." The program has collected more than 20,000 assessments from kids who have tried Food Hero recipes at school or at community events. About 36 percent of the tested recipes have received the "kid-approved" rating to date. "When our nutrition educators say to the children, 'Would you like to try this for us and tell us what you think?' it empowers them," Manore said. "It also is a way to expose kids to foods they may not have tried before." Parents and caregivers are also surveyed after their children participate in tasting exercises. Of those who completed surveys, 79 percent said their child talked about what they had learned in school about healthy eating; 69 percent reported that their child asked for specific recipes; and 72 percent reported making at least one Food Hero recipe, the research showed. As Food Hero's tips, tools and recipes get shared in person, online, through the media and via social media, the program's reach also expands beyond the initial audience, the researchers said. Recipes from the program are now being used around the world, and in 2015, the recipes on the Food Hero website received more than 290,000 page views. Anyone interested can also subscribe to Food Hero Monthly, an electronic magazine that includes recipes and tips. To sign up, visit https:/ . In addition to their collaborations with Oregon partners such as the Department of Human Services, Department of Education and Oregon Health Authority, Food Hero program leaders are sharing materials and ideas with public health and SNAP-Ed programs in other states. "Since 95 percent of the Food Hero recipes contain fruits and/or vegetables, people who try the recipes are helping us meet the primary goal of the campaign, which is to encourage more fruit and vegetable consumption, especially among low-income families," Tobey said.


News Article | December 12, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -- Food stamp participants who participated in a supplemental nutrition education program were able to improve their food security by 25 percent, according to a study by Purdue University. "Food assistance is very important and this shows that nutrition education is an effective part of improving food security as the lessons focused on practical ways to stretch food dollars while eating nutritiously," said Heather Eicher-Miller, an assistant professor of nutrition science. "In Indiana, Snap Ed is making a significant impact, and it is amazing that an education program that is shared with just one person in a household has the power to change how an entire family is eating for one year. What these families learn can last longer than the food assistance they receive." These findings are published in The Journal of Nutrition. During 2013, 19.5 percent of U. S. households with children experienced food insecurity at some time during the year, and children can suffer from psychological, behavioral and physical problems if they do not consume enough food. The federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, known as SNAP, serves millions of low-income individuals and families. SNAP is a part of the USDA's Food and Nutrition Service. SNAP-Ed programs can vary from state to state. The direct education provided through SNAP-Ed programs in Indiana are hands on, and all lessons combine maximizing the food budget while focusing on nutritional components, such as consuming lean meats and vegetables and fruits. One lesson includes visiting a grocery story to compare prices while studying items' nutritional labels. These lessons are provided through local Purdue Extension offices. In this randomized controlled study, 575 individuals from low-income Indiana households, each with at least one child, participated in the first four Indiana SNAP-Ed curriculum lessons. The lessons were taught by 41 SNAP-Ed educators from 38 Indiana counties. The individuals were interviewed before they started the education program and a year later. "The fact that what they learned made a difference months later is remarkable," said Eicher-Miller, who also is director of Indiana's Emergency Food Resource Network. "This educational program is voluntary for SNAP participants. We may not see such a large increase in food security over time if the program was required for the population it serves." This research was supported by a grant from the University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research through funding by the USDA, Food and Nutrition Service.


Grindal T.,Abt Associates Inc. | Wilde P.,Tufts University | Schwartz G.,Abt Associates Inc. | Klerman J.,Abt Associates Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Food Policy | Year: 2016

Objectives This study investigates whether the response of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants to a 30% incentive on fruit and vegetable spending varies with their access to food retailers. Methods The analysis exploits the random assignment of SNAP households in Hampden County, MA, to an intervention group that earned the incentive. Regression models for the impact of the incentive are augmented with measures of food retail access and interactions of random assignment status with food retail access. The main outcome—use of the SNAP benefit—is based on Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) card transaction records. Results Although households that lived within a mile of a participating supermarket spent approximately $2.13 or 19% more per month on targeted fruits and vegetables at participating supermarkets than households that did not live within a mile of a participating supermarket, we found no evidence that the impact of the incentive on SNAP fruit and vegetable spending varies with distance to retailers. Conclusions These findings imply that incentives to purchase fruits and vegetables were equally efficacious for SNAP households with high and low access to food retailers. © 2016


PubMed | Food and Nutrition Service
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of nutrition education and behavior | Year: 2011

To develop and test nutrition messages and supporting content with low-income mothers for use with theory-based interventions addressing fruit and vegetable consumption and child-feeding practices.Six formative and 6 evaluative focus groups explored message concepts and tested messages, respectively.Research facilities in Maryland, Texas, California, Florida, North Carolina, New York, Alabama, and Illinois.Ninety-five low-income mothers of 2- to 5-year-old children; over half from households participating in a federal nutrition assistance program.Preference for and comprehension of nutrition messages.Qualitative data analysis procedures to generate common themes from transcripts and observers notes.Messages on role modeling, cooking and eating together, having patience when introducing new food items, and allowing children to serve themselves were well received. Mothers preferred messages that emphasized their role as a teacher and noted benefits such as their children becoming more independent and learning new skills. Mothers commonly doubted childrens ability to accurately report when they are full and disliked messages encouraging mothers to allow children to decide whether and how much to eat.This study generated 7 audience-tested messages for incorporation into nutrition education interventions targeting low-income mothers of preschool-age children.

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