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Busch J.A.,Taxonomy Strategies | Bliss V.,Taxonomy Strategies | Hlava M.,Access Innovations | Subirats I.,Food and Agriculture Organization of the un | And 2 more authors.
Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting | Year: 2014

Knowledge organization systems (KOS) are the key elements for interlinking the values of Linked Data datasets. Existing KOS products (including well-known thesauri and classification systems) need to be transformed into the constructs of Linked Data services, much more beyond what a traditional thesaurus or classification were/are developed, but how? What can these Linked Data KOS bring to various information services? The panelists will share their experiences and lessons learned. The presentation starts from the processes that have been developed to build, maintain, and publish a newly derived taxonomy using W3C SKOS standard, to make it extensible and scalable to support new information services in scholarly publishing workflow. The next presentation will share experiences and lessons learned from the implementation of a platform built for publishing and distribution of multiple KOS and for automatic indexing using these KOS. The third case is a Linked Data bibliographic service, a RDF-aware system and a mash up application which relies on the use of a multilingual thesaurus that has been published and maintained as a Linked Data dataset, and has been mapped to more than ten KOS. For the datasets that have not used standardized KOS, the panel will present methods that can be applied when generating or deriving project-focused micro-thesauri from the Linked Data KOS and give an overview of the use cases of Linked Data KOS in information services.


Fritz S.,International Institute For Applied Systems Analysis | See L.,International Institute For Applied Systems Analysis | Mccallum I.,International Institute For Applied Systems Analysis | You L.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | And 47 more authors.
Global Change Biology | Year: 2015

A new 1 km global IIASA-IFPRI cropland percentage map for the baseline year 2005 has been developed which integrates a number of individual cropland maps at global to regional to national scales. The individual map products include existing global land cover maps such as GlobCover 2005 and MODIS v.5, regional maps such as AFRICOVER and national maps from mapping agencies and other organizations. The different products are ranked at the national level using crowdsourced data from Geo-Wiki to create a map that reflects the likelihood of cropland. Calibration with national and subnational crop statistics was then undertaken to distribute the cropland within each country and subnational unit. The new IIASA-IFPRI cropland product has been validated using very high-resolution satellite imagery via Geo-Wiki and has an overall accuracy of 82.4%. It has also been compared with the EarthStat cropland product and shows a lower root mean square error on an independent data set collected from Geo-Wiki. The first ever global field size map was produced at the same resolution as the IIASA-IFPRI cropland map based on interpolation of field size data collected via a Geo-Wiki crowdsourcing campaign. A validation exercise of the global field size map revealed satisfactory agreement with control data, particularly given the relatively modest size of the field size data set used to create the map. Both are critical inputs to global agricultural monitoring in the frame of GEOGLAM and will serve the global land modelling and integrated assessment community, in particular for improving land use models that require baseline cropland information. These products are freely available for downloading from the http://cropland.geo-wiki.org website. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Sparks T.H.,University of Cambridge | Sparks T.H.,University of Life Sciences in Poznań | Sparks T.H.,TU Munich | Butchart S.H.M.,BirdLife International | And 20 more authors.
ORYX | Year: 2011

The target adopted by world leaders of significantly reducing the rate of biodiversity loss by 2010 was not met but this stimulated a new suite of biodiversity targets for 2020 adopted by the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in October 2010. Indicators will be essential for monitoring progress towards these targets and the CBD will be defining a suite of relevant indicators, building on those developed for the 2010 target. Here we argue that explicitly linked sets of indicators offer a more useful framework than do individual indicators because the former are easier to understand, communicate and interpret to guide policy. A Response-Pressure-State-Benefit framework for structuring and linking indicators facilitates an understanding of the relationships between policy actions, anthropogenic threats, the status of biodiversity and the benefits that people derive from it. Such an approach is appropriate at global, regional, national and local scales but for many systems it is easier to demonstrate causal linkages and use them to aid decision making at national and local scales. We outline examples of linked indicator sets for humid tropical forests and marine fisheries as illustrations of the concept and conclude that much work remains to be done in developing both the indicators and the causal links between them. © 2011 Fauna & Flora International.


PubMed | WHO, Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN, International Food Policy Research Institute, Aga Khan University and 18 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of nutrition | Year: 2015

In 2013, the Nutrition for Growth Summit called for a Global Nutrition Report (GNR) to strengthen accountability in nutrition so that progress in reducing malnutrition could be accelerated. This article summarizes the results of the first GNR. By focusing on undernutrition and overweight, the GNR puts malnutrition in a new light. Nearly every country in the world is affected by malnutrition, and multiple malnutrition burdens are the new normal. Unfortunately, the world is off track to meet the 2025 World Health Assembly (WHA) targets for nutrition. Many countries are, however, making good progress on WHA indicators, providing inspiration and guidance for others. Beyond the WHA goals, nutrition needs to be more strongly represented in the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) framework. At present, it is only explicitly mentioned in 1 of 169 SDG targets despite the many contributions improved nutritional status will make to their attainment. To achieve improvements in nutrition status, it is vital to scale up nutrition programs. We identify bottlenecks in the scale-up of nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive approaches and highlight actions to accelerate coverage and reach. Holding stakeholders to account for delivery on nutrition actions requires a well-functioning accountability infrastructure, which is lacking in nutrition. New accountability mechanisms need piloting and evaluation, financial resource flows to nutrition need to be made explicit, nutrition spending targets should be established, and some key data gaps need to be filled. For example, many UN member states cannot report on their WHA progress and those that can often rely on data >5 y old. The world can accelerate malnutrition reduction substantially, but this will require stronger accountability mechanisms to hold all stakeholders to account.


Haddad L.,International Food Policy Research Institute | Achadi E.,University of Indonesia | Bendech M.A.,Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN | Ahuja A.,Women and Child Development | And 23 more authors.
Journal of Nutrition | Year: 2015

In 2013, the Nutrition for Growth Summit called for a Global Nutrition Report (GNR) to strengthen accountability in nutrition so that progress in reducing malnutrition could be accelerated. This article summarizes the results of the first GNR. By focusing on undernutrition and overweight, the GNR puts malnutrition in a new light. Nearly every country in the world is affected by malnutrition, and multiple malnutrition burdens are the "new normal." Unfortunately, the world is off track to meet the 2025 World Health Assembly (WHA) targets for nutrition. Many countries are, however, making good progress onWHA indicators, providing inspiration and guidance for others. Beyond the WHA goals, nutrition needs to be more strongly represented in the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) framework. At present, it is only explicitlymentioned in 1 of 169 SDG targets despite the many contributions improved nutritional status will make to their attainment. To achieve improvements in nutrition status, it is vital to scale up nutrition programs. We identify bottlenecks in the scale-up of nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive approaches and highlight actions to accelerate coverage and reach. Holding stakeholders to account for delivery on nutrition actions requires a well-functioning accountability infrastructure, which is lacking in nutrition. New accountability mechanisms need piloting and evaluation, financial resource flows to nutrition need to bemade explicit, nutrition spending targets should be established, and some key data gaps need to be filled. For example, many UN member states cannot report on their WHA progress and those that can often rely on data > 5 y old. The world can accelerate malnutrition reduction substantially, but this will require stronger accountability mechanisms to hold all stakeholders to account. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.


Celli F.,Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN | Keizer J.,Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN | Jaques Y.,Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN | Konstantopoulos S.,Greek National Center For Scientific Research | Vudragovic D.,University of Belgrade
F1000Research | Year: 2015

The social media revolution is having a dramatic effect on the world of scientific publication. Scientists now publish their research interests, theories and outcomes across numerous channels, including personal blogs and other thematic web spaces where ideas, activities and partial results are discussed. Accordingly, information systems that facilitate access to scientific literature must learn to cope with this valuable and varied data, evolving to make this research easily discoverable and available to end users. In this paper we describe the incremental process of discovering web resources in the domain of agricultural science and technology. Making use of Linked Open Data methodologies, we interlink a wide array of custom-crawled resources with the AGRIS bibliographic database in order to enrich the user experience of the AGRIS website. We also discuss the SemaGrow Stack, a query federation and data integration infrastructure used to estimate the semantic distance between crawled web resources and AGRIS. © 2015 Celli F et al.


PubMed | Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN, Greek National Center For Scientific Research and University of Belgrade
Type: | Journal: F1000Research | Year: 2016

The social media revolution is having a dramatic effect on the world of scientific publication. Scientists now publish their research interests, theories and outcomes across numerous channels, including personal blogs and other thematic web spaces where ideas, activities and partial results are discussed. Accordingly, information systems that facilitate access to scientific literature must learn to cope with this valuable and varied data, evolving to make this research easily discoverable and available to end users. In this paper we describe the incremental process of discovering web resources in the domain of agricultural science and technology. Making use of Linked Open Data methodologies, we interlink a wide array of custom-crawled resources with the AGRIS bibliographic database in order to enrich the user experience of the AGRIS website. We also discuss the SemaGrow Stack, a query federation and data integration infrastructure used to estimate the semantic distance between crawled web resources and AGRIS.


Wang X.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Zhao Q.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Hu Y.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Zheng Y.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | And 6 more authors.
Irrigation Science | Year: 2012

The field experiment for cotton crop (Gossypium hirsutum L.) was conducted at the Zhongjie Farm, Huanghua city of Hebei province in the coastal salinity-affected areas in North China Plain, to determine the effects of an alternative of irrigation water sources/methods and agronomic practices on seedling emergence and yields of cotton, soil water-salt distributions, and soil pH changes during cotton growth stages. The experiment was setup using split-plot design with two water sources as main treatments (well water/desalinized sea-ice water); two irrigation methods (+PAM (Polyacrylamide)/-PAM); and four fertilization modes: check (CK), mineral fertilizer (F), mineral + organic fertilizer (FM), and mineral fertilizer + gypsum (FG). Using desalinized sea-ice water irrigation showed the same effects on top-soil salt leaching and desalinization as using well water did. There was no significant difference in seedling emergence and cotton yields between two irrigation water sources for cotton irrigation. Using PAM-treated irrigation, the 10-cm top-soil salinity significantly decreased to about 2.3-3.9 g kg -1 from 4.6 to 8.6 g kg -1 (PAM untreated). The PAM-treated irrigation increased seedling emergence by about 13, 29 and 36% and yields by about 50, 49, and 70%, with F, FM, and FG, respectively, as compared with CK. PAM-treated irrigation, either using well water or desalinized sea ice, especially in combination with gypsum-fertilization, shows the best practice for both seedling emergence and cotton yields. In conclusion, the desalinized sea-ice water used as an alternative water source, integrated with better agronomic practices of soil water-salt management could be acceptable for cotton irrigation in the coastal saline areas. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


Sedik D.,Food and Agriculture Organization of the un | Lerman Z.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem | Uzun V.,Russian Academy of the economics and State Service
Post-Soviet Affairs | Year: 2013

This article analyzes the implications of World Trade Organization (WTO) accession for Russian agricultural policy. Using Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) data on producer support from 2010, we identify two major characteristics of Russian agricultural and trade policy (a) reliance on sizeable differences between world and domestic prices to generate two-thirds of agricultural producer support and (b) highly distortionary budget support. We then consider whether the disciplines introduced by WTO accession will constrain or even roll back these distortionary policies, thereby substantially changing the nature of agricultural policies in Russia. Using data from OECD-FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) and Russian Ministry of Agriculture projections, we conclude that the structure of OECD-type producer support in 2020 will be very similar to its current state. Market price support will continue to dominate the Producer Support Estimate, and the projected Current Total Aggregate Measure of Support (AMS) will approach the WTO Bound Total AMS (the ceiling on production-distorting support) only in 2018. For the reasons above, we conclude that although WTO accession provides opportunities for important changes in Russian sanitary, phytosanitary, food safety, trade, and tariff policies, membership is not a guarantee of systemic change. In fact, a serious look at Russian WTO commitments makes a minimum-change scenario quite possible and even likely. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.


Morshed A.,Food and Agriculture Organization of the un | Johannsen G.,Food and Agriculture Organization of the un | Lei Zeng M.,Kent State University | Keizer J.,Food and Agriculture Organization of the un
Proceedings of the International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications | Year: 2010

The AGROVOC is multilingual structure thesaurus for Agricultural domain. It has already been mapped with several vocabularies, for example, AGROVOC-CAT, AGROVOC-NALT, and AGROVOC-SWD. Although these vocabularies already contained a good portion of non-preferred terms, the terms are collected under the literary warrant and institutional warrant principles; which means vocabularies were collected based on the documents and publications rather than user?s queries. It is still very common that end users would use different terms to express the same concept. In light of above discussion, we need to bridge these vocabularies and the users? terms.

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