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Tavoni M.,Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei | Socolow R.,Princeton University
Climatic Change | Year: 2013

This article introduces the Climatic Change special issue dedicated to negative emissions technologies, also known as carbon dioxide removal (CDR) from the atmosphere. CDR is the only class of mitigation options able to reduce the carbon stock in the atmosphere significantly. In this special issue CDR is explored from the perspectives of integrated assessment, technology optimization, environmental science, and political science. © 2013 The Author(s). Source


Verdolini E.,Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei | Galeotti M.,Bocconi University
Journal of Environmental Economics and Management | Year: 2011

This paper contributes to the induced innovation literature by extending the analysis of supply and demand determinants of innovation in energy technologies to account for international knowledge flows and spillovers. We select a sample of 38 innovating countries and study how knowledge related to energy-efficient and environmentally friendly technologies flows across geographical and technological space. We demonstrate that higher geographical and technological distances are associated with lower probabilities of knowledge flow. Next, we use previous estimates to construct internal and external knowledge stocks for a panel of 17 countries. We then present an econometric analysis of the supply and demand determinants of innovation accounting for international knowledge spillovers. Our results confirm the role of demand-pull effects, proxied by energy prices, and of technological opportunity, proxied by the knowledge stocks. Our results show that spillovers between countries have a significant positive impact on further innovation in energy-efficient and environmentally friendly technologies. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. Source


Athanassoglou S.,Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei | Xepapadeas A.,Athens University of Economics and Business
Journal of Environmental Economics and Management | Year: 2012

The precautionary principle (PP) applied to environmental policy stipulates that, in the presence of uncertainty, society must take robust preventive action to guard against worst-case outcomes. It follows that the higher the degree of uncertainty, the more aggressive this preventive action should be. This normative maxim is explored in the case of a stylized dynamic model of pollution control with uncertain (in the Knightian sense) stock dynamics, using the robust control framework of Hansen and Sargent . [12]. Optimal investment in damage control is found to be increasing in the degree of uncertainty, thus confirming the conventional PP wisdom. Optimal mitigation decisions, however, need not always comport with the PP. In particular, when damage-control investment is both sufficiently cheap and sensitive to changes in uncertainty, damage-control investment and mitigation may act as substitutes and a PP with respect to the latter can be unambiguously irrational. The theoretical results are applied to a calibrated linear-quadratic model of climate change. The analysis suggests that a reversal of the PP with respect to mitigation, while theoretically possible, is very unlikely. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. Source


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 2.12M | Year: 2016

The global GEMCLIME project focuses on major aspects of energy economics and climate change, which is a prime example of an important global and complex scientific and policy problem. GEMCLIME covers the drivers of climate change, the examination of climate change and energy-related risks and vulnerabilities, the valuation of economic impacts of climate change mitigation and adaptation policies, and the investigation of major policy responses to global climate and energy challenges. GEMCLIME follows an integrated approach to modelling the impacts of climate and energy policies. The analysis of drivers, impacts, and responses to climate change attributes particular attention to the economics of renewable energies and the valuation of non-marketed goods. While GEMCLIME is focused on fundamental economic research, our results also provide support to evidence-based policy. GEMCLIME brings together both globally and regionally the most excellent institutions and researchers with wide-ranging research experience in the context of a collaborative scheme of research exchanges and networking. The members of the consortium share their skills and knowledge from the areas of climate change, energy, resource, health, environmental, and agricultural economics, while drawing on the expertise of participants in financial economics, applied macroeconomics, microeconomics, and econometrics. Our consortium also includes researchers and academics from non-economic disciplines, including political scientists, sociologists, lawyers, environmental scientists, and other scientists related to climate and energy. The reciprocal transfer of knowledge between the members of the consortium is supported by a staff exchange including senior research fellows, professors, early-career academics, and doctoral students. Our global project aims at supporting research mobility between the EU on one side, and the USA, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, Singapore, and Chile on the other side.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IRSES | Award Amount: 821.30K | Year: 2014

Climate change is one of the most challenging and important problems facing European and world society. Our project concentrates on several key aspects of climate change economics, including the valuation of climate change impacts, the main determinants of key drivers of climate change, the economic impact of climate change mitigation policies and the examination of climate change related risks, vulnerabilities and adaptation potential. Our project follows an integrated approach to modelling the impacts of climate and energy policies as a way to advance towards a highly energy efficient, low carbon and green global economy. Particular attention is devoted to the economics of renewable energies and the valuation of non-marketed goods. While the results of our joint project will contribute to fundamental economic research, an important part of our results will also support evidence-based policy. Our project brings together leading researchers and outstanding scholars with wide-ranging research experience in the context of a collaborative scheme of research exchanges and networking. The members of the consortium provide skills and knowledge from the areas of the economics of climate change, energy, resource, health, environmental and agricultural economics, while drawing on additional expertise of participants in financial economics, applied macroeconomics, microeconomics and econometrics. Admitting a value of multi-disciplinary research, our consortium is enriched by researchers and academics from other disciplines, including sociologists, lawyers and environmental scientists. The staff exchanges will enable the reciprocal transfer of knowledge between the members of the consortium, including senior research fellows, professors, early-career academics and PhD students, covering mobility flows between the EU on one side, and the USA, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Africa and Russia on the other side.

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