Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei

Milano, Italy

Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei

Milano, Italy
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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EE-08-2016 | Award Amount: 1.99M | Year: 2016

The project aims at improving our understanding on behavioural mechanisms in energy efficiency, following an interdisciplinary and broad behavioural science approach. The project will provide an empirical and numerical assessment of the psychological, social, economic and financial factors that influence energy efficiency in the residential and industry sectors By paring with energy utilities and retailers in different European countries, the project will conduct scientific experiments (A/B testing) which will enhance the design of policies aiming at maximizing energy efficient behaviors. The project will use novel data from different European countries to take into consideration institutional and political factors. The project will analyze consumers behavior related to the consumption of energy, the investment in energy efficient products, as well as the renovation of buildings. Finally, ex ante assessment will be executed using improved energy economy models, which will generate quantitative information with regard to expected impacts of EU and global policies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH.2013.7.1-1 | Award Amount: 2.98M | Year: 2014

The project POst-CArbon CIties of TOmorrow foresight for sustainable pathways towards liveable, affordable and prospering cities in a world context (POCACITO) will develop an evidence-based 2050 roadmap for EU post-carbon cities. POCACITO facilitates the transition of EU cities to a forecasted sustainable or post-carbon economic model. The project focuses on towns, cities, megacities, metropolitan areas and urban clusters larger than 1 million people as well as small and medium-sized cities. POCACITOs approach uses participatory scenario development as a mutual learning and living lab environment strategy. The project recognises that post-carbon city transitions should improve urban resilience to fluctuating environmental and socio-economic pressure. Pressure in this context includes long-term changes in urban resident demographics, city and rural migration patterns, and potential city health concerns. Further, POCACITO develops innovative long-term outlooks for European post-carbon cities to address climate adaptation and urban environmental metabolism concerns by using a participatory city case study approach. Case study cities include Barcelona, Copenhagen/Malm, Istanbul, Lisbon, Litomerice, Milan/Turin, Offenburg and Zagreb. These cities will develop qualitative post-carbon visions with local stakeholders. Visions will be chosen based on selected best-practice measures and preliminary city assessments. Accompanying studies will yield a typology of post-carbon cities and a post-carbon city index. A marketplace of ideas will spread best practices from other EU cities and global cities in global emerging nations, allowing an international exchange of urban best practices. Related research will produce case study city roadmaps and an evidence-based 2050 roadmap for post-carbon EU cities within a global context. The projects research supports the sustainable development objective of the Europe 2020 strategy and the Innovation Union flagship initiative.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2012.6.1-2 | Award Amount: 7.43M | Year: 2013

Integrated assessment and energy-economy models have become central tools for informing long-term global and regional climate mitigation strategies. There is a large demand for improved representations of complex system interactions and thorough validation of model behaviour in order to increase user confidence in climate policy assessments. ADVANCE aims to respond to this demand by facilitating the development of a new generation of integrated assessment models. This will be achieved by substantial progress in key areas where model improvements are greatly needed: end use and energy service demand; representation of heterogeneity, behaviour, innovation and consumer choices; technical change and uncertainty; system integration, path dependencies and resource constraints; and economic impacts of mitigation policies. In the past, methodological innovations and improvements were hindered by the unavailability of suitable input data. The ADVANCE project will make a large and coordinated effort to generate relevant datasets. These datasets, along with newly developed methodologies, will be made available to the broader scientific community as open-access resources. ADVANCE will also put a focus on improved model transparency, model validation, and data handling. A central objective of ADVANCE is to evaluate and to improve the suitability of models for climate policy impact assessments. The improved models will be applied to an assessment of long-term EU climate policy in a global context, and disseminated to the wider community. The ADVANCE consortium brings together long-standing expertise in integrated assessment and energy-economy modelling with a strong expertise in material flows, energy system integration, and energy service demand.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.5-3 | Award Amount: 7.73M | Year: 2013

The project SWITCH-ON addresses water concerns to thoroughly explore and exploit the significant and currently untapped potential of open data. Water information is highly sought after by many kinds of end-users, both within government and business as well as within civil society. Water touches virtually all societal and environmental domains and the knowledge domain is largely multidisciplinary. New water information and knowledge can thus lead to more efficient use of environmental services and better handling of environmental problems, including those induced by climate and environmental change. SWITCH-ON will show the benefits achieved through the whole process chain by re-purposing (re-using under different context) open data products into more dedicated and refined water products, which have high value and a broad impact on society. The vision is to improve public services, and to foster business opportunities and growth, by establishing new forms of water research and facilitating the development of new products and services based on principles of sharing. The SWITCH-ON objectives are to use open data for implementing: 1) an innovative spatial information platform with open data tailored for direct water assessments, 2) an entirely new form of collaborative research for water-related sciences, 3) fourteen new operational products and services dedicated to appointed end-users, 4) new business and knowledge to inform individual and collective decisions in line with the Europes smart growth and environmental objectives. While focusing on water, the project is expected to inspire a much broader environmental and societal knowledge domain and many different end-users. The SWITCH-ON project will be one trigger in a contemporary global movement to better address environmental and societal challenges through openness and collaboration.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IRSES | Award Amount: 821.30K | Year: 2014

Climate change is one of the most challenging and important problems facing European and world society. Our project concentrates on several key aspects of climate change economics, including the valuation of climate change impacts, the main determinants of key drivers of climate change, the economic impact of climate change mitigation policies and the examination of climate change related risks, vulnerabilities and adaptation potential. Our project follows an integrated approach to modelling the impacts of climate and energy policies as a way to advance towards a highly energy efficient, low carbon and green global economy. Particular attention is devoted to the economics of renewable energies and the valuation of non-marketed goods. While the results of our joint project will contribute to fundamental economic research, an important part of our results will also support evidence-based policy. Our project brings together leading researchers and outstanding scholars with wide-ranging research experience in the context of a collaborative scheme of research exchanges and networking. The members of the consortium provide skills and knowledge from the areas of the economics of climate change, energy, resource, health, environmental and agricultural economics, while drawing on additional expertise of participants in financial economics, applied macroeconomics, microeconomics and econometrics. Admitting a value of multi-disciplinary research, our consortium is enriched by researchers and academics from other disciplines, including sociologists, lawyers and environmental scientists. The staff exchanges will enable the reciprocal transfer of knowledge between the members of the consortium, including senior research fellows, professors, early-career academics and PhD students, covering mobility flows between the EU on one side, and the USA, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Africa and Russia on the other side.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 2.12M | Year: 2016

The global GEMCLIME project focuses on major aspects of energy economics and climate change, which is a prime example of an important global and complex scientific and policy problem. GEMCLIME covers the drivers of climate change, the examination of climate change and energy-related risks and vulnerabilities, the valuation of economic impacts of climate change mitigation and adaptation policies, and the investigation of major policy responses to global climate and energy challenges. GEMCLIME follows an integrated approach to modelling the impacts of climate and energy policies. The analysis of drivers, impacts, and responses to climate change attributes particular attention to the economics of renewable energies and the valuation of non-marketed goods. While GEMCLIME is focused on fundamental economic research, our results also provide support to evidence-based policy. GEMCLIME brings together both globally and regionally the most excellent institutions and researchers with wide-ranging research experience in the context of a collaborative scheme of research exchanges and networking. The members of the consortium share their skills and knowledge from the areas of climate change, energy, resource, health, environmental, and agricultural economics, while drawing on the expertise of participants in financial economics, applied macroeconomics, microeconomics, and econometrics. Our consortium also includes researchers and academics from non-economic disciplines, including political scientists, sociologists, lawyers, environmental scientists, and other scientists related to climate and energy. The reciprocal transfer of knowledge between the members of the consortium is supported by a staff exchange including senior research fellows, professors, early-career academics, and doctoral students. Our global project aims at supporting research mobility between the EU on one side, and the USA, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, Singapore, and Chile on the other side.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-EF | Award Amount: 168.28K | Year: 2016

Although the EU is on track to achieve the climate targets of 20-20-20, there is an ongoing debate over whether a more aggressive emission reduction goal is needed to be set for 2030. The root cause of such debate is not only the lack of scientific understanding of climate change but also severe uncertainties about the pace of change and the extent to which it impacts human and natural systems. The policy implications of climate change uncertainty depend on the proper treatment of uncertainty in integrated assessment models (IAM) of climate change. There have been several attempts to incorporate uncertainty in standard IAM frameworks but the results vary widely across the models. This is in particular important for implementing effective mitigation and adaptation strategies within the EU which require a great deal of coordination among the member states with different levels of economic development and political incentives. The objective of this research is to develop a framework for robust climate policy making under uncertainty. During the first stage of this project I will conduct a through survey of current treatment of uncertainty in standard IAMs to obtain the best practices. In the second stage, I will develop a unifying framework for analyzing decision making under uncertainty in the context of climate change. I will adopt a robust optimization approach to assess climate targets and the optimal pathway to achieve those objectives. This theoretical framework then will be applied to the current and future EU climate targets and the results will be illustrated for climate policy making in Italy as a key Member State.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-EF | Award Amount: 168.28K | Year: 2016

Drought risks and water scarcity are expected to intensify as a result of human-induced climate change. Some areas in Europe, notably the Mediterranean countries are more prone to prolonged drought spells than others. Understanding and properly measuring the overall and sector-wide economic impact of those episodes at the geographically most disaggregated level is of crucial importance for the design of disaster risk management instruments and other policy-related issues. At the same time, it becomes necessary to assess whether this response varies over time. In other words, we need to know whether we are somehow adapting to climate change. Adaptation in the context of climate change is a concept that raises many questions: empirical estimates are scarce and highly desired by scientists and institutions like the IPCC; how this adaptation mechanism can be embedded into economic models of climate change is also an unresolved issue. I will try to address both in this project. The objective of my research is twofold: on the one hand, obtain quantitative measures of the economic impact of droughts and test for the existence of adapting behaviour and, on the other hand, respond the demands of the IPCC that urge for progress in the integration and modelling of adaptation into climate-economy models. To do so, in a first stage I will apply econometric techniques envisaged by the new climate-economy literature to regional, European-wide data to obtain estimates of the economic consequences of droughts and unveil potential adapting behaviour. Then, I will resort to sophisticated climate-economy models, like CGE and IAM models, to shed light into the modelling of adapting behaviour under deterministic and stochastic scenarios.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2014-EF | Award Amount: 168.28K | Year: 2015

More than 50% of total water abstractions in Southern Europe come from the agricultural sector, rising to more than 80% in some regions. Water abstractions are particularly high and fast growing in profitable irrigated areas in the Mediterranean Basin, where agricultural demand enters in direct competition with basic environmental services increasingly often. Urgent action is needed to address this unsustainable trade-off. Economic instruments represent a means of adapting demand to collectively agreed goals and thus relief pressure over stressed EU water bodies. In particular, recent water resources research has put forward the role that can be played by agricultural water markets and drought insurance for irrigated agriculture. These two instruments have been already tested (markets) or at least explored (insurance) in a EU context, but it is still unclear what can be expected from them. The objective of my research is advancing in the design and development of agricultural water markets and insurance systems that contribute to the implementation of an effective and efficient water policy mix in the EU. In a first stage I will develop quantitative methods using Revealed Preferences Models and Agent Based Models to estimate the economic and environmental outcomes of the proposed instruments under different scenarios. In the second stage I will use an analytical framework to critically assess the efficiency and effectiveness of drought insurance and water markets in a wider policy context. Theoretical constructions will be illustrated with empirical applications in the Po River Basin District (RBD) in Italy and the Segura RBD in Spain.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-EF | Award Amount: 168.28K | Year: 2016

The European Union (EU) has set ambitious greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) targets: 20% lower than 1990 levels by 2020, rising to 40% lower by 2030 and 85% lower by 2050. Moreover, a target of at least 27% on the share of renewable energy consumed in EU is set for 2030. To facilitate renewable integration, the EU is implementing the European Single Electricity Market (ESEM). The efficient use of electricity interconnection envisaged by the ESEM can mitigate the system instability caused by a high penetration of intermittent renewables; however the challenging targets on emissions and renewable generation add constraints that need to be evaluated. In the first stage of my analysis, I will develop scenarios of the EU generation sector, focusing on the Italian market and the countries it shares electricity interconnection with. The goal is to investigate the role of investments in renewable generation and transmission network needed to meet the overall EU targets at minimum cost. I will then determine how the costs associated to interconnection and to investment in renewables are distributed among jurisdictions and between generators and consumers. In the second stage, I will investigate how the results of the first model change if electricity storage, the electrification of transport and electric heating are widely adopted. I will identify if demand management in the presence of these technologies help to match a supply that depends largely on renewable generation.

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