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Fm Technologies, Inc.

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Morrill J.S.,U.S. Navy | Floyd L.,Fm Technologies, Inc. | McMullin D.,Space Systems Research Corporation
Solar Physics | Year: 2014

Knowledge of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) is important in determining the impact of solar variability on climate. Observations of UV SSI have been made by the Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), the Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE), and the Solar Irradiance Monitor (SIM), both on the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite. Measurements by SUSIM and SORCE overlapped from 2003 to 2005. SUSIM and SORCE observations represent ∼ 20 years of absolute UV SSI. Unfortunately, significant differences exist between these two data sets. In particular, changes in SORCE UV SSI measurements, gathered at moderate and minimum solar activity, are a factor of two greater than the changes in SUSIM observations over the entire solar cycle. In addition, SORCE UV SSI have a substantially different relationship with the Mg ii index than did earlier UV SSI observations. Acceptance of these new SORCE results impose significant changes on our understanding of UV SSI variation. Alternatively, these differences in UV SSI observations indicate that some or all of these instruments have changes in instrument responsivity that are not fully accounted for by the current calibration. In this study, we compare UV SSI changes from SUSIM with those from SIM and SOLSTICE. The primary results are that (1) long-term observations by SUSIM and SORCE generally do not agree during the overlap period (2003 - 2005), (2) SUSIM observations during this overlap period are consistent with an SSI model based on Mg ii and early SUSIM SSI, and (3) when comparing the spectral irradiance for times of similar solar activity on either side of solar minimum, SUSIM observations show slight differences while the SORCE observations show variations that increase with time between spectra. Based on this work, we conclude that the instrument responsivity for SOLSTICE and SIM need to be reevaluated before these results can be used for climate-modeling studies. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Mako F.M.,Fm Technologies, Inc. | Mako F.M.,Helios Materials Technologies Inc. | Cruz E.J.,Fm Technologies, Inc. | Tian Y.L.,Fm Technologies, Inc. | And 2 more authors.
AIChE Ethylene Producers Conference Proceedings | Year: 2014

FM Technologies, Inc. (FMT) has developed new methods for joining SiC-to-SiC and SiC-to-metal for use in ethylene production. Ethylene production involves the cracking of liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon feedstock in the presence of steam at low pressures and elevated temperatures inside pipe coils within a pyrolysis furnace. These coils are subjected to some of the most severe operating conditions in the petrochemical industry, experiencing extreme thermal cycling, coking, carburization, oxidation and creep during service, often resulting in reduced service life and premature pipe failures. Conventional metal coils in general have always been hindered by temperature limitations and the frequent maintenance required for coke removal. Silicon-carbide (SiC) ceramic tube, on the contrary, has nearly double the service temperature of the metals currently used in today's ethylene furnaces and is inherently resistant to carburization and coking. The use of SiC tube in the firebox of the furnace in place of the usual metal coil would allow processing at significantly higher temperatures, greatly improving the energy efficiency and yield of the ethylene cracking process. However, producing SiC tubes long enough for practical use has proven challenging. The novel high-temperature joining methods developed at FMT circumvent this issue by allowing easily manufactured 15-20ft SiC tubes to be joined end to end to form a complete furnace coil, and then allows for the ceramic coil to be joined to standard metal tubing at the ends of the firebox. The joining is accomplished by various methods through the use of a proprietary mix of joining materials. Sample joints and their performance results will be presented. Demand for improved coil technology is high, with annual tube consumption by ethylene producers exceeding $600Million, and the joined SiC tubing presents a significant jump in performance over what is currently in use today. This is especially important for the current boom in US ethylene production, as new plants will certainly be implementing this sort of game changing technology to ensure the most return on the $1-$4Billion investment required to build them.


Trademark
Fm Technologies, Inc. | Date: 2013-10-24

cancer treatment equipment using an accelerator device.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.97K | Year: 2015

Statement of the problem or situation that is being addressed. This proposed research project responds directly to the need of a high-efficiency continuous-wave microwave source at a frequency of 1.497 GHz delivering at least 8kW of power. This research will provide a klystron with an overall efficiency of 82% and a high degree of backwards compatibility to allow its use as a replacement for klystrons currently used today, which are only 35% efficient. General statement of how this problem is being addressed. FM Technologies, Inc. (FMT) is proposing a novel high-power (8 kW) high-efficiency (82%) continuous- wave (CW) L-band (1.497 GHz) klystron system, which will be named the L-band Micro-Pulse Klystron (L- MPA). The L-MPK is an extension of FMTs patented and proprietary Micro-Pulse Gun (MPG) technology suite that will allow for improved performance and dramatic energy savings. What is to be done in Phase I? In Phase I, design and analysis will be the focus. An continuous-wave (CW) micro-pulse electron gun will be developed, in conjunction with appropriate insulation and post acceleration. A complete system design will be performed for the L-band Micro-Pulse Klystron. Fabrication drawings will be generated for a prototype to be built in Phase II. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits If successful, this L-band Micro-Pulse Klystron will provide a high-power, high-efficiency RF power source that can be scaled to other microwave frequencies and used in a continuous-wave or pulsed mode, making it suitable for many applications. Of particular interest are high-power RF sources for fusion research, linear colliders, free electron lasers, and medical and industrial RF linacs. Key Words: RF source, klystron, fusion Summary for Members of Congress: This program will develop a radio-frequency power source suitable for many applications and of particular importance for large scale accelerators and RF linacs. It will also advance the state of the art of klystron technology, making them more compact, more energy efficient and longer lasting.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.99K | Year: 2010

Chemical treatment such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP) followed by high pressure rinsing (HPR) of niobium (Nb) superconducting RF (SRF) cavities is expensive and complex multistep process. Furthermore, the cavity RF surfaces after the treatment still have numerous bubbles and pits that result from welding. These quench-producing weld defects together with the particulate contamination, result in significant scatter of the multi-cell Nb SRF cavities performance characteristics. This scatter is the major problem in the current manufacturing of the Nb SRF cavities. FM Technologies proposes a new chemical-free processing for multi-cell Nb SRF cavities using an internal electron beam (IEB). Specifically, FMT proposes to develop a new electron gun system that will perform electron beam melting over the entire interior surface of Nb SRF cavities to produce a smooth surface, free from voids, bubbles, and other imperfections. This will allow manufacturing of the Nb SRF cavities without the above chemical treatment procedures and increase the cavities high gradient performance. In Phase I, 30 Nb samples were surface melted by an electron beam, beam parameters were determined to achieve a quality Nb surface (qualified by HIROX, AFM, SEM and EBSD). A complete Nb SRF cavity, without chemical etching, was electron beam melted at the interior surface and RF tested in the superconducting range. Several electron gun designs were evaluated. Phase II is aimed at building and testing a complete prototype computer controlled electron beam interior cavity surface melting system. Many Nb samples will be surface melted and beam parameters established to achieve a high quality surface (qualified by HIROX, AFM, SEM and EBSD). Single and multi-cell Nb SRF cavities will have the interior surface melted by this system at FMT, without chemical etching, Jefferson Lab (J-lab) will perform RF testing on these cavities. Commercial applications and other benefits: When developed the chemical free surafce processing using IEB will benefit first J-lab's CEBAF and Fermilab's Project X. Also, light sources, require 1.3 - 1.5 GHz SRF structures. Furthermore, IEB will produce much broader impact because it can be implemented into manufacturing of many other types of RF devices including both superconducting as well as normal conducting RF cavities.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2011

The development of high-current, short-duration pulses of electrons has been a challenging problem for many years. High current pulses are widely used in injector systems for electron accelerators, both for industrial linacs as well as high-energy accelerators for linear colliders. Short-duration pulses are also used for microwave generation, in klystrons and related devices, for injectors to perform research on advanced methods of particle acceleration, and for injectors used as free-electron-laser (FEL) drivers. The proposed method to be described below is promising because of a natural bunching process which self-synchronizes to the rf, thus eliminating the need for pre-buncher section(s), timing system, and laser. Also, the repetition rate can be orders of magnitude greater. FM Technologies proposes a novel high current, picosecond X-band injector system which is named the X-Band Bunched Electron Injector (XBEI). The heart of the XBEI is a self-bunching electron gun the Micro-Pulse Gun (MPG). By adding an external electron amplifier stage and high energy RF post acceleration an inexpensive, simple, robust electron injector would be the outcome. Phase I is aimed at measurements of: electron current gain, charge per bunch, rf power, beam power and other key parameters. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: If successful, this micro XBEI will provide a high power, low emittance, picosecond-long electron source which is suitable for many applications. Of particular interest are high energy picosecond electron injectors for linear colliders, free electron lasers, medical and industrial rf linacs, a high-harmonic, high-frequency driver for rf sources and accelerator test facilities.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.00M | Year: 2016

This proposed research project responds directly to the need of a high-efficiency continuous-wave microwave source at a frequency of 1.497 GHz delivering at least 8kW of power. This research will provide a klystron with an overall efficiency of 82% and a high degree of backwards compatibility to allow its use as a replacement for klystrons currently used today, which are only 35% efficient. General statement of how this problem is being addressed. FM Technologies, Inc. (FMT) is proposing a novel high-power (8 kW) high-efficiency (82%) continuous- wave (CW) L-band (1.497 GHz) klystron system, which will be named the L-band Micro-Pulse Klystron (L- MPA). The L-MPK is an extension of FMT’s patented and proprietary Micro-Pulse Gun (MPG) technology suite that will allow for improved performance and dramatic energy savings. What is to be done in Phase I? In Phase I, design and analysis will be the focus. An continuous-wave (CW) micro-pulse electron gun will be developed, in conjunction with appropriate insulation and post acceleration. A complete system design will be performed for the L-band Micro-Pulse Klystron. Fabrication drawings will be generated for a prototype to be built in Phase II. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits If successful, this L-band Micro-Pulse Klystron will provide a high-power, high-efficiency RF power source that can be scaled to other microwave frequencies and used in a continuous-wave or pulsed mode, making it suitable for many applications. Of particular interest are high-power RF sources for fusion research, linear colliders, free electron lasers, and medical and industrial RF linacs.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.00M | Year: 2012

The development of high-current, short-duration pulses of electrons has been a challenging problem for many years. High current pulses are widely used in injector systems for electron accelerators, both for industrial linacs as well as high-energy accelerators for linear colliders. Short-duration pulses are also used for microwave generation in klystrons and related devices, for injectors to perform research on advanced methods of particle acceleration, and for injectors used as free-electron-laser (FEL) drivers. The proposed method to be described below is promising because of a natural bunching process which self-synchronizes to the rf, thus eliminating the need for pre-buncher section(s), timing system, and lasers. Also, the repetition rate can be orders of magnitude greater. FM Technologies proposes a novel high current, picosecond X-band bunched electron gun system which is named the X-band Bunched Electron Injector (XBEI). The heart of the XBEI is a self-bunching electron gun, the X-Band Micro-Pulse Gun (XMPG). By adding an external electron amplifier stage and high energy RF or pulsed voltage post acceleration, an inexpensive, simple, robust electron injector or klystron self-bunching electron gun would result. In Phase I, electron amplification with diamond in the XMPA has been demonstrated, and measurements of electron current gain, charge per bunch, rf power, beam power and other key parameters have been performed. Phase II will be aimed at design, fabrication, and testing of an XBEI to 5-6 MeV and a new type of klystron. This includes development of the electron amplifier for the XMPG and rf acceleration and a klystron output cavity. The experiments will be to establish the baseline for characterizing the XBEI device for suitability for a variety of potential applications. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: If successful, this micro-pulse electron amplifier injector (XBEI) will provide a high power, low admittance, picosecond-long electron source which is suitable for many applications. Of particular interest are high energy picosecond electron injectors for linear colliders, free electron lasers, medical and industrial rf linacs, a high-frequency driver for rf sources

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