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State College, Florida, United States

The Florida State University

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News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

eMentor, powered by AcademyWomen, is joining forces with the Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF) at Syracuse University to offer online mentoring support to alumni of the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities (EBV), Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities-Families (EBV-F) and Veteran Women Igniting the Spirit of Entrepreneurship (V-WISE) programs. Alumni from these programs, which help shape veterans and military family members into successful entrepreneurs, will benefit from coaching by seasoned veteran and civilian entrepreneurs through the award-winning, web-based eMentor Leadership Program. Membership also includes ongoing post-program support with access to discussion forums and other relevant resources. Mentors and protégés receive membership at no cost. AcademyWomen has powered award-winning online mentoring services for military, veterans, and military spouses for almost a decade. Susan Feland, AcademyWomen Founder and President, said, "Mentoring provides protégés with perspective and insights helping them through countless decisions and challenges. For entrepreneurs, this can make the difference between success and failure. We're excited for the eMentor Leadership Program to help veterans find success post-service." Mentors for the eMentor program are selected for their expertise and willingness to support protégés after their IVMF programs are completed. “Entrepreneurs cite mentors and networks as one of the most important resources needed to start a new business,” said Meghan Florkowski, IVMF Director of Entrepreneurship Programs. "The IVMF is thrilled to have eMentor as a support mechanism for our EBV, EBV-F and V-WISE program participants. This partnership will bolster the number of successful entrepreneurs from the military and veteran communities." Visit ementorprogram.org to learn more about the Military Entrepreneur eMentor program and ivmf.syracuse.edu to learn more about the entrepreneurship programs that have served over 50,000 veterans, service members and military spouses. AcademyWomen is a 501c3 nonprofit leadership and professional development organization providing award-winning mentoring programs, networking events and career development opportunities. AcademyWomen cultivates and leverages the leadership of military officer and veteran women to impact positive change locally, nationally and globally. Through a group of like-minded women and men, AcademyWomen employs its global network to inspire ideas and action that make a positive difference in their communities and the world. This mission is achieved by serving a broader community of all military women, families and veterans. AcademyWomen builds and powers programs like eMentor, to also serve uniformed men, enlisted servicewomen /veterans, military spouses as well as past, current and future female officers. Membership is open to current and former military women officers from all commissioning sources and to all who are committed to the success of AcademyWomen’s mission. For more information, visit http://academywomen.org and follow AcademyWomen on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. eMentor is an award-winning online mentoring program that connects military personnel, veterans and military spouses for dynamic mentoring experiences that powerfully move them forward in their personal and professional lives. eMentor consists of multiple mentoring communities, each customized to meet the needs of its participants and to facilitate engaging relationships driven by the protégé’s goals. Since its launch in 2008, eMentor has served over 9,500 participants, including both men and women, officers and enlisted, members and veterans of all branches of the service, military spouses, officers-in-training and mentors from nearly every industry. eMentor boasts a 90% mentoring relationship satisfaction rating and has connected 41% of its participants to meaningful employment and career opportunities. eMentor has become one of the largest, most successful mentoring programs of its kind, and has been awarded HR.com’s Leadership Excellence Awards for Best Mentoring Program Nationally for the past four years. For more information, visit ementorprogram.org and follow eMentor on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. About the Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF) at Syracuse University The Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF) is the first interdisciplinary national institute in higher education focused on the social, economic, education and policy issues impacting veterans and their families post-service. The Institute is supported by a world-class advisory board and public and private partners committed to advancing the post-service lives of America’s service members, veterans and military families. The IVMF and its professional staff deliver leading programs in career, vocational and entrepreneurship education and training. The Institute also conducts actionable research, policy analysis and program evaluations, coordinates comprehensive collective impact strategies, and works with communities and non-profits to enhance service delivery for veterans and their families. For more information, visit ivmf.syracuse.edu and follow the IVMF on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. About the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities (EBV) The Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities (EBV) is a first-of-its-kind initiative that transforms veterans into entrepreneurs. Delivered by the Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF) at Syracuse University, the EBV leverages the skills, resources and infrastructure of higher education to offer cutting-edge, experiential training in entrepreneurship and small business management to post-9/11 veterans with service-related disabilities. Founded at Syracuse University in 2007, the program has since expanded to nine additional universities across the U.S., including Cornell University, The Florida State University, Louisiana State University, Purdue University, Saint Joseph’s University, Texas A&M University, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), University of Connecticut and University of Missouri. Assistance from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), corporate partners and donors allows post-9/11 veterans and transitioning service members with service-connected disabilities to attend the program at no cost. For more information, visit ivmf.syracuse.edu and follow the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram About the Veteran Women Igniting the Spirit of Entrepreneurship (V-WISE) Program The Veteran Women Igniting the Spirit of Entrepreneurship (V-WISE) program provides women veterans and military spouses with the tools to become successful entrepreneurs. Attendees of the V-WISE program receive in-depth instruction from prominent business owners, leadership consultants, educators, veterans and other experts who help shape their development as entrepreneurs in the areas of accounting, business law, business planning, finance, government contracting, human resources, marketing and technology. Created by the Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF) at Syracuse University and the Martin J. Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University in partnership with the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), the program has impacted more than 2,000 women veterans and military spouses from all service branches and eras with more than 65 percent of V-WISE graduates starting or expanding a business. Ninety-two percent of V-WISE graduates are still in business today. They have generated over $41 million in revenue. For more information on V-WISE and its graduates, visit vwise.org and follow the V-Wise program on Facebook and Twitter.


Segovia F.,University of Granada | Gorriz J.M.,University of Granada | Ramirez J.,University of Granada | Martinez-Murcia F.J.,University of Granada | And 4 more authors.
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2017

Parkinsonism is the second more common neurological disease and affects around 1%–2% of people over 65 years, being around 20%–24% of them incorrectly diagnosed. The disorder is associated to a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons of the striatum. Thus, its diagnosis is usually corroborated by analyzing neuroimaging data of this region. In this work, we propose a novel computer system to automatically distinguish between parkinsonian patients and neurologically healthy subjects using123I-FP-CIT SPECT data, a neuroimaging modality widely used to assist the diagnosis of Parkinsonism. First, the voxels of the striatum were selected using an intensity threshold. These voxels were then projected over the axial plane, resulting in a two-dimensional image with the striatum shape. Subsequently, the size and shape of the left and right sides of the striatum were characterized by 5 features: area, eccentricity, orientation and length of the major and minor axes. Finally, the extracted features were used along with a Support Vector Machine classifier to separate patients and controls. An accuracy rate of 91.53% (p <0.001) was estimated using a k-fold cross-validation scheme and a database with 189123I-FP-CIT SPECT neuroimages. This rate outperformed the ones achieved by previous approaches when using the same data. © Springer International Publishing AG 2017.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Florida State University College of Business has appointed A-LIGN Managing Partner, Scott Price, as the Board Chair to the Department of Accounting’s Professional Advisory Board (PAB). Scott Price, a certified public accountant, received his Master’s in Accountancy from Florida State University. In his time at Florida State University, Price was the President of the Accounting Society and Vice President of the fraternity, Delta Chi. “As an alumnus, I learned so much in my time at Florida State University, and want to continue to enhance the Accounting program at Florida State University from the employer perspective,” said Price. The PAB is comprised of accounting and auditing leaders from around the country who provide input to the accounting faculty, in order to enhance the accounting education at Florida State. Scott Price currently serves as the Managing Partner at A-LIGN, a full-service security, assurance, and compliance solutions firm offering services ranging from SOC 1 examinations to FedRAMP security assessments. Price was recently named to Accounting Today’s 2016 Managing Partner Elite list as one of the top accounting firm leaders in the nation. Price is also past Chair of the Board of Governors of the Florida Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Looking for a career that exceeds all expectations? A-LIGN is currently accepting applications for a number of different positions. Find out more about our open positions at http://www.a-lign.com/careers. To learn more about A-LIGN’s services, visit http://www.a-lign.com. Feel free to reach out to an A-LIGN representative at info(at)a-lign(dot)com to learn more about how A-LIGN can help you navigate the compliance landscape.


PubMed | The Florida State University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Communicative & integrative biology | Year: 2012

Centrosomes are microtubule-organizing centers that nucleate spindle microtubules during cell division. In budding yeast, the centrosome, often referred to as the spindle pole body, shares structural components with the centriole, the central core of the animal centrosome. The parental centrosome is duplicated when DNA replication takes place. Like sister chromatids tethered together by cohesin, duplicated centrosomes are linked and then separate to form the bipolar spindle necessary for chromosome segregation. Recent studies have shown that cohesin is also localized to the animal centrosome and is perhaps directly involved in engaging paired centrioles. Here we discuss the potential role of cohesin in mediating spindle-pole-body cohesion in the context of yeast meiosis. We propose that the coordination of chromosome segregation with centrosome cohesion and duplication is mediated by the antagonistic interaction between the Aurora kinase and the Polo kinase and that the role of cohesin in centrosome regulation appears to be indirect in budding yeast.


PubMed | The Florida State University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Physiology & behavior | Year: 2012

Physiological and nutritional state can modify sensory ability and perception through hormone signaling. Obesity and related metabolic disorders present a chronic imbalance in hormonal signaling that could impact sensory systems. In the olfactory system, external chemical cues are transduced into electrical signals to encode information. It is becoming evident that this system can also detect internal chemical cues in the form of molecules of energy homeostasis and endocrine hormones, whereby neurons of the olfactory system are modulated to change animal behavior towards olfactory cues. We hypothesized that chronic imbalance in hormonal signaling and energy homeostasis due to obesity would thereby disrupt olfactory behaviors in mice. To test this idea, we utilized three mouse models of varying body weight, metabolic hormones, and visceral adiposity - 1) C57BL6/J mice maintained on a condensed-milk based, moderately high-fat diet (MHF) of 32% fat for 6 months as the diet-induced obesity model, 2) an obesity-resistant, lean line of mice due to a gene-targeted deletion of a voltage-dependent potassium channel (Kv 1.3-null), and 3) a genetic model of obesity as a result of a gene-targeted deletion of the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R-null). Diet-induced obese (DIO) mice failed to find a fatty-scented hidden peanut butter cracker, based solely on olfactory cues, any faster than an unscented hidden marble, initially suggesting general anosmia. However, when these DIO mice were challenged to find a sweet-scented hidden chocolate candy, they had no difficulty. Furthermore, DIO mice were able to discriminate between fatty acids that differ by a single double bond and are components of the MHF diet (linoleic and oleic acid) in a habituation-dishabituation paradigm. Obesity-resistant, Kv1.3-null mice exhibited no change in scented object retrieval when placed on the MHF-diet, nor did they perform differently than wild-type mice in parallel habituation-dishabituation paradigms of fatty food-related odor components. Genetically obese, MC4R-null mice successfully found hidden scented objects, but did so more slowly than lean, wild-type mice, in an object-dependent fashion. In habituation-dishabituation trials of general odorants, MC4R-null mice failed to discriminate a novel odor, but were able to distinguish two fatty acids. Object memory recognition tests for short- and long-term memory retention demonstrated that maintenance on the MHF diet did not modify the ability to perform these tasks independent of whether mice became obese or were resistant to weight gain (Kv1.3-null), however, the genetically predisposed obese mice (MC4R-null) failed the long-term object memory recognition performed at 24h. These results demonstrate that even though both the DIO mice and genetically predisposed obese mice are obese, they vary in the degree to which they exhibit behavioral deficits in odor detection, odor discrimination, and long-term memory.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

In the closing seconds of a tied soccer game two opposing players sprint into the penalty box in pursuit of a loose ball and collide, limbs flailing as they both fall to the turf. Instantly, all eyes are on the head referee, tasked with the unenviable job of making a game-changing decision without the benefit of a slow-motion replay. Recent research suggests, however, that elite soccer referees have something working in their favor—enhanced perceptual and cognitive skills that help them make the right call. In the study, published this week in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, researchers had elite and sub-elite referees make calls based on video footage of soccer plays while an eye-tracking system recorded where on the screen they were looking. The elite referees were not only better than the amateurs at making the correct call, they were also better at anticipating where the foul would occur before it happened. As humans, we rely on our perceptual-cognitive skills to navigate the complex events that continuously unfold around us. Any given situation starts with the perceptual—we watch an event as it happens, relying on our eyes to capture what we see and relay it to our brains. Then the cognitive phase begins, as our brains process the information and help us interpret it so we can decide what to do next. Of course, the more intense the situation, the more challenging this becomes—for example, if we are asked to process information and make a decision under pressure. Perhaps unsurprisingly, elite athletes have top-notch perceptual-cognitive skills—they are adept at focusing their attention on the most relevant part of an event and using the information to react accordingly. But what about referees, the oft-overlooked individuals charged with keeping the athletes in line? Researchers from the University of Leuven in Belgium enrolled 20 elite referees from the two highest-level professional soccer divisions in the country, along with 19 sub-elite referees active at lower competitive levels. The referees watched video clips of foul play situations filmed from a first-person perspective near the action, categorized as either open play situations (where one or two attackers engaged with two defenders) or corner kick situations (where six or seven attackers scrapped with six or seven defenders in front of the goal). Each clip contained one interaction, and referees were asked if a foul had occurred and how they would rate the severity—that is, whether they would assign a yellow or red card. Meanwhile an eye-tracking system consisting of a camera and infrared lights recorded where on the screen the referees were looking to assess how they were focusing their attention. “Eye movements are the mirror of the mind,” says Werner Helsen, a kinesiologist and the study’s senior author. “Whatever you look at, you pay attention to.” The researchers found that elite referees made the correct call 61 percent of the time, compared with 45 percent for the sub-elite refs. Furthermore, elite referees were better at honing in on the bodily appendages and areas the players would use to commit the foul. “It was clear that the more elite a referee you are, the more you anticipate and the more you look at the specific spots where the foul will be committed,” explains Helsen, who adds that less experienced referees were more likely to be looking at the wrong location. For example, the ref might focus on a player’s arms although the foul was committed with the offender’s legs. According to Helsen, elite referees do not have an innate talent for making accurate calls—rather, they develop their skills via extensive practice. The key to success for refs then is not only to know whereto look but to have the experience to interpret what they see and make a correct decision. “The eyes are useless if the mind is blind,” Helsen says. The next step is finding new and innovative ways to train referees so they can gain experience and improve their perceptual-cognitive skills outside of a game situation, much like the intensive training athletes engage in prior to a competition. Helsen has already developed a Web-based application that referees used to prepare for the 2016 UEFA European Championship in France. Gershon Tenenbaum, a professor of sport and exercise psychology at The Florida State University who was not involved in the research, praises the study but points out that it was conducted in a laboratory, which means referees did not have to contend with game dynamics such as external pressure from coaches, players and spectators as well as physiological factors such as an elevated heart rate or fatigue. Nevertheless, he adds that the study confirms the findings of previous research on experts in a variety of areas. Helsen points out that even mundane tasks such as driving require us to use our perceptual-cognitive skills under pressure. And the stakes are much higher for police officers, firefighters, pilots, soldiers or surgeons—where the way they focus their attention and how they interpret information and make decisions can be a matter of life or death. “I see more and more that the way people become experts across disciplines is very, very similar,” Helsen says.

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