Florey Institute

Melbourne, Australia

Florey Institute

Melbourne, Australia
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Carvill G.L.,University of Washington | Heavin S.B.,University of Melbourne | Yendle S.C.,University of Melbourne | McMahon J.M.,University of Melbourne | And 38 more authors.
Nature Genetics | Year: 2013

Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of epilepsies with poor prognosis, of which the majority are of unknown etiology. We perform targeted massively parallel resequencing of 19 known and 46 candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy in 500 affected individuals (cases) to identify new genes involved and to investigate the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in known genes. Overall, we identified pathogenic mutations in 10% of our cohort. Six of the 46 candidate genes had 1 or more pathogenic variants, collectively accounting for 3% of our cohort. We show that de novo CHD2 and SYNGAP1 mutations are new causes of epileptic encephalopathies, accounting for 1.2% and 1% of cases, respectively. We also expand the phenotypic spectra explained by SCN1A, SCN2A and SCN8A mutations. To our knowledge, this is the largest cohort of cases with epileptic encephalopathies to undergo targeted resequencing. Implementation of this rapid and efficient method will change diagnosis and understanding of the molecular etiologies of these disorders. © 2013 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.


Cheng L.,University of Melbourne | Doecke J.D.,CSIRO | Sharples R.A.,University of Melbourne | Villemagne V.L.,Austin Health | And 8 more authors.
Molecular Psychiatry | Year: 2015

There is no consensus for a blood-based test for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Expression profiling of small non-coding RNA's, microRNA (miRNA), has revealed diagnostic potential in human diseases. Circulating miRNA are found in small vesicles known as exosomes within biological fluids such as human serum. The aim of this work was to determine a set of differential exosomal miRNA biomarkers between healthy and AD patients, which may aid in diagnosis. Using next-generation deep sequencing, we profiled exosomal miRNA from serum (N=49) collected from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Flagship Study (AIBL). Sequencing results were validated using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR; N=60), with predictions performed using the Random Forest method. Additional risk factors collected during the 4.5-year AIBL Study including clinical, medical and cognitive assessments, and amyloid neuroimaging with positron emission tomography were assessed. An AD-specific 16-miRNA signature was selected and adding established risk factors including age, sex and apolipoprotein ε4 (APOE ε4) allele status to the panel of deregulated miRNA resulted in a sensitivity and specificity of 87% and 77%, respectively, for predicting AD. Furthermore, amyloid neuroimaging information for those healthy control subjects incorrectly classified with AD-suggested progression in these participants towards AD. These data suggest that an exosomal miRNA signature may have potential to be developed as a suitable peripheral screening tool for AD. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


PubMed | Florey Institute, Austin Health, University of Melbourne, Edith Cowan University and CSIRO
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular psychiatry | Year: 2015

There is no consensus for a blood-based test for the early diagnosis of Alzheimers disease (AD). Expression profiling of small non-coding RNAs, microRNA (miRNA), has revealed diagnostic potential in human diseases. Circulating miRNA are found in small vesicles known as exosomes within biological fluids such as human serum. The aim of this work was to determine a set of differential exosomal miRNA biomarkers between healthy and AD patients, which may aid in diagnosis. Using next-generation deep sequencing, we profiled exosomal miRNA from serum (N=49) collected from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Flagship Study (AIBL). Sequencing results were validated using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR; N=60), with predictions performed using the Random Forest method. Additional risk factors collected during the 4.5-year AIBL Study including clinical, medical and cognitive assessments, and amyloid neuroimaging with positron emission tomography were assessed. An AD-specific 16-miRNA signature was selected and adding established risk factors including age, sex and apolipoprotein 4 (APOE 4) allele status to the panel of deregulated miRNA resulted in a sensitivity and specificity of 87% and 77%, respectively, for predicting AD. Furthermore, amyloid neuroimaging information for those healthy control subjects incorrectly classified with AD-suggested progression in these participants towards AD. These data suggest that an exosomal miRNA signature may have potential to be developed as a suitable peripheral screening tool for AD.


PubMed | Altair Biostatistics, University of Calgary, Hospital Clinic Of Barcelona, Swedish Medical Center and 15 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: JAMA | Year: 2016

Endovascular thrombectomy with second-generation devices is beneficial for patients with ischemic stroke due to intracranial large-vessel occlusions. Delineation of the association of treatment time with outcomes would help to guide implementation.To characterize the period in which endovascular thrombectomy is associated with benefit, and the extent to which treatment delay is related to functional outcomes, mortality, and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage.Demographic, clinical, and brain imaging data as well as functional and radiologic outcomes were pooled from randomized phase 3 trials involving stent retrievers or other second-generation devices in a peer-reviewed publication (by July 1, 2016). The identified 5 trials enrolled patients at 89 international sites.Endovascular thrombectomy plus medical therapy vs medical therapy alone; time to treatment.The primary outcome was degree of disability (mRS range, 0-6; lower scores indicating less disability) at 3 months, analyzed with the common odds ratio (cOR) to detect ordinal shift in the distribution of disability over the range of the mRS; secondary outcomes included functional independence at 3 months, mortality by 3 months, and symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation.Among all 1287 patients (endovascular thrombectomy+medical therapy [n=634]; medical therapy alone [n=653]) enrolled in the 5 trials (mean age, 66.5 years [SD, 13.1]; women, 47.0%), time from symptom onset to randomization was 196 minutes (IQR, 142 to 267). Among the endovascular group, symptom onset to arterial puncture was 238 minutes (IQR, 180 to 302) and symptom onset to reperfusion was 286 minutes (IQR, 215 to 363). At 90 days, the mean mRS score was 2.9 (95% CI, 2.7 to 3.1) in the endovascular group and 3.6 (95% CI, 3.5 to 3.8) in the medical therapy group. The odds of better disability outcomes at 90 days (mRS scale distribution) with the endovascular group declined with longer time from symptom onset to arterial puncture: cOR at 3 hours, 2.79 (95% CI, 1.96 to 3.98), absolute risk difference (ARD) for lower disability scores, 39.2%; cOR at 6 hours, 1.98 (95% CI, 1.30 to 3.00), ARD, 30.2%; cOR at 8 hours,1.57 (95% CI, 0.86 to 2.88), ARD, 15.7%; retaining statistical significance through 7 hours and 18 minutes. Among 390 patients who achieved substantial reperfusion with endovascular thrombectomy, each 1-hour delay to reperfusion was associated with a less favorable degree of disability (cOR, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.76 to 0.93]; ARD, -6.7%) and less functional independence (OR, 0.81 [95% CI, 0.71 to 0.92], ARD, -5.2% [95% CI, -8.3% to -2.1%]), but no change in mortality (OR, 1.12 [95% CI, 0.93 to 1.34]; ARD, 1.5% [95% CI, -0.9% to 4.2%]).In this individual patient data meta-analysis of patients with large-vessel ischemic stroke, earlier treatment with endovascular thrombectomy+medical therapy compared with medical therapy alone was associated with lower degrees of disability at 3 months. Benefit became nonsignificant after 7.3 hours.


Kim Y.O.,University of Melbourne | Kim Y.O.,Chonnam National University | Korff C.M.,University of Geneva | Villaluz M.M.G.,University of Melbourne | And 8 more authors.
Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology | Year: 2013

STXBP1 encephalopathy is associated with a range of movement disorders. We observed head stereotypies in three patients. These comprised a slow (<1Hz), high-amplitude, horizontal, 'figure-of-eight' pattern, beginning at age 4-6 years and resulting in neck muscle hypertrophy, in two males; a faster (2-3Hz), side-to-side, 'no' movement, starting at the age of 9 years 6 months was observed in one female. Upper limb and truncal stereotypies and vocalization occurred intermittently with the head movements. The stereotypies increased with excitement but settled with concentration and sleep. Head and upper limb stereotypies are valuable clinical clues to the diagnosis of STXBP1 encephalopathy in patients with profound impairments. © 2013 Mac Keith Press.


Carvill G.L.,University of Washington | Weckhuysen S.,Neurogenetics Group | Weckhuysen S.,University of Antwerp | Weckhuysen S.,Epilepsy Center Kempenhaeghe | And 28 more authors.
Neurology | Year: 2014

Objective: To determine the genes underlying Dravet syndrome in patients who do not have an SCN1A mutation on routine testing. Methods: We performed whole-exome sequencing in 13 SCN1A-negative patients with Dravet syndrome and targeted resequencing in 67 additional patients to identify new genes for this disorder. Results: We detected disease-causing mutations in 2 novel genes for Dravet syndrome, with mutations in GABRA1 in 4 cases and STXBP1 in 3. Furthermore, we identified 3 patients with previously undetected SCN1A mutations, suggesting that SCN1A mutations occur in even more than the currently accepted ~75% of cases. Conclusions: We show that GABRA1 and STXBP1 make a significant contribution to Dravet syndrome after SCN1A abnormalities have been excluded. Our results have important implications for diagnostic testing, clinical management, and genetic counseling of patients with this devastating disorder and their families. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.


Turner S.J.,University of Melbourne | Hildebrand M.S.,University of Melbourne | Block S.,La Trobe University | Damiano J.,University of Melbourne | And 9 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A | Year: 2013

Relatively little is known about the neurobiological basis of speech disorders although genetic determinants are increasingly recognized. The first gene for primary speech disorder was FOXP2, identified in a large, informative family with verbal and oral dyspraxia. Subsequently, many de novo and familial cases with a severe speech disorder associated with FOXP2 mutations have been reported. These mutations include sequencing alterations, translocations, uniparental disomy, and genomic copy number variants. We studied eight probands with speech disorder and their families. Family members were phenotyped using a comprehensive assessment of speech, oral motor function, language, literacy skills, and cognition. Coding regions of FOXP2 were screened to identify novel variants. Segregation of the variant was determined in the probands' families. Variants were identified in two probands. One child with severe motor speech disorder had a small de novo intragenic FOXP2 deletion. His phenotype included features of childhood apraxia of speech and dysarthria, oral motor dyspraxia, receptive and expressive language disorder, and literacy difficulties. The other variant was found in a family in two of three family members with stuttering, and also in the mother with oral motor impairment. This variant was considered a benign polymorphism as it was predicted to be non-pathogenic with in silico tools and found in database controls. This is the first report of a small intragenic deletion of FOXP2 that is likely to be the cause of severe motor speech disorder associated with language and literacy problems. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | Florey Institute, Monash University, Hunter Medical Research Institute, St Vincents Hospital and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of stroke : official journal of the International Stroke Society | Year: 2015

The majority of strokes, both ischaemic and haemorrhagic, are attributable to a relatively small number of risk factors which are readily manageable in primary care setting. Implementation of best-practice recommendations for risk factor management is calculated to reduce stroke recurrence by around 80%. However, risk factor management in stroke survivors has generally been poor at primary care level. A model of care that supports long-term effective risk factor management is needed.To determine whether the model of Integrated Care for the Reduction of Recurrent Stroke (ICARUSS) will, through promotion of implementation of best-practice recommendations for risk factor management reduce the combined incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction and vascular death in patients with recent stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) of the brain or eye.A prospective, Australian, multicentre, randomized controlled trial.Academic stroke units in Melbourne, Perth and the John Hunter Hospital, New South Wales.1000 stroke survivors recruited as from March 2007 with a recent (<3 months) stroke (ischaemic or haemorrhagic) or a TIA (brain or eye).Randomization and data collection are performed by means of a central computer generated telephone system (IVRS).Exposure to the ICARUSS model of integrated care or usual care.The composite of stroke, MI or death from any vascular cause, whichever occurs first.Risk factor management in the community, depression, quality of life, disability and dementia.With 1000 patients followed up for a median of one-year, with a recurrence rate of 7-10% per year in patients exposed to usual care, the study will have at least 80% power to detect a significant reduction in primary end-pointsThe ICARUSS study aims to recruit and follow up patients between 2007 and 2013 and demonstrate the effectiveness of exposure to the ICARUSS model in stroke survivors to reduce recurrent stroke or vascular events and promote the implementation of best practice risk factor management at primary care level.


Carvill G.L.,University of Washington | Regan B.M.,University of Melbourne | Yendle S.C.,University of Melbourne | O'Roak B.J.,University of Washington | And 28 more authors.
Nature Genetics | Year: 2013

Epilepsy-aphasia syndromes (EAS) are a group of rare, severe epileptic encephalopathies of unknown etiology with a characteristic electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern and developmental regression particularly affecting language. Rare pathogenic deletions that include GRIN2A have been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders. We sought to delineate the pathogenic role of GRIN2A in 519 probands with epileptic encephalopathies with diverse epilepsy syndromes. We identified four probands with GRIN2A variants that segregated with the disorder in their families. Notably, all four families presented with EAS, accounting for 9% of epilepsy-aphasia cases. We did not detect pathogenic variants in GRIN2A in other epileptic encephalopathies (n = 475) nor in probands with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (n = 81). We report the first monogenic cause, to our knowledge, for EAS. GRIN2A mutations are restricted to this group of cases, which has important ramifications for diagnostic testing and treatment and provides new insights into the pathogenesis of this debilitating group of conditions. © 2013 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

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