FLIR Radiation GmbH

Germany

FLIR Radiation GmbH

Germany
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Swiderski L.,National Center for Nuclear Research | Moszynski M.,National Center for Nuclear Research | Czarnacki W.,National Center for Nuclear Research | Szawlowski M.,National Center for Nuclear Research | And 6 more authors.
Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment | Year: 2013

Relative light yield and intrinsic energy resolution of NaI:Tl, CsI:Na and CsI:Tl crystals were investigated by means of the wide angle Compton coincidence technique in wide energy range from several keV up to 1 MeV. The experimental setup consisted of a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the tested scintillators were put at a close separation from the HPGe detector. The tested samples were cylinders of 25 mm diameter and height coupled to a photomultiplier. Compton electron responses were compared to the results obtained with γ-ray absorption peaks. A correlation between intrinsic resolution of the tested scintillation materials and their nonproportionality was observed. Substantial differences in intrinsic resolution measured for γ-ray absorption peaks and Compton electrons were registered in the energy range between 50 keV and 200 keV. The results were discussed in terms of electron scattering, pointing to δ-ray production as an important contribution for determination of scintillator intrinsic resolution.


Swiderski L.,National Center for Nuclear Research | Marcinkowski R.,National Center for Nuclear Research | Szawlowski M.,National Center for Nuclear Research | Moszynski M.,National Center for Nuclear Research | And 6 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science | Year: 2012

Non-proportionality of light yield and energy resolution of Compton electrons in three scintillators (LaBr 3:Ce, LYSO:Ce and CsI:Tl) were studied in a wide energy range from 10 keV up to 1 MeV. The experimental setup was comprised of a High Purity Germanium detector and tested scintillators coupled to a photomultiplier. Probing the non-proportionality and energy resolution curves at different energies was obtained by changing the position of various radioactive sources with respect to both detectors. The distance between both detectors and source was kept small to make use of Wide Angle Compton Coincidence (WACC) technique, which allowed us to scan large range of scattering angles simultaneously and obtain relatively high coincidence rate of 100 cps using weak sources of about 10 μCi activity. The results are compared with those obtained by direct irradiation of the tested scintillators with gamma-ray sources and fitting the full-energy peaks. © 2012 IEEE.


Plettner C.,National Center for Nuclear Research | Pausch G.,National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology | Scherwinski F.,FLIR Radiation GmbH | Herbach C.M.,VacuTec Messteknik GmbH | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Instrumentation | Year: 2013

Homeland security applications demand performant two-plane Compton-camera systems, with high detector efficiency, good nuclide identification and able to perform in-field conditions. A low-Z scintillator has been proposed and studied as a promising candidate for use in the scattering plane of a scintillator-based Compton camera: CaF2(Eu) [1]. All the relevant properties for the application of this scintillator in a mobile Compton camera system, have been addressed: the energy resolution and the non-proportionality at room temperature and in the temperature range of -20°C to +55°C, the photoelectron yield and the relative light yield in the relevant temperature range. A new method of inferring the relative light output of scintillators has been proposed. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd and Sissa Medialab srl.


Swiderski L.,Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies | Marcinkowski R.,Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies | Moszynski M.,Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies | Czarnacki W.,Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Instrumentation | Year: 2012

Light yield nonproportionality and the intrinsic resolution of some low atomic number scintillators were studied by means of the Wide Angle Compton Coincidence (WACC) technique. The plastic and liquid scintillator response to Compton electrons was measured in the energy range of 10 keV up to 4 MeV, whereas a CaF2: Eu sample was scanned from 3 keV up to 1 MeV. The nonproportionality of the CaF2: Eu light yield has characteristics typical for inorganic scintillators of the multivalent halides group, whereas tested organic scintillators show steeply increasing nonproportionality without saturation point. This is in contrast to the behavior of all known inorganic scintillators having their nonproportionality curves at saturation above energies between tens and several hundred keV. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd and Sissa Medialab srl.


Pausch G.,FLIR Radiation GmbH | Herbach C.-M.,FLIR Radiation GmbH | Mitchell D.,Sandia National Laboratories | Lentering R.,FLIR Radiation GmbH | Stein J.,FLIR Radiation GmbH
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2012

Passive radiation detection systems have been developed to screen passengers, vehicles, and cargo for illicit radioactive sources by measuring gamma and neutron signatures with separate, specialized sensors. The paper introduces a novel concept combining neutron and gamma sensing in a single detector, thus reducing the overall expense. Low-cost converter media capture thermal neutrons and commute neutron flux in energetic gammas, which are then detected by a common gamma detector. Energy signals above 3 MeV indicate the neutron captures. Two prototype systems are presented: (1) The NCD-BGO, a segmented 655 ml BGO scintillator with embedded Cd absorber, demonstrated an intrinsic thermal-neutron detection efficiency of about 50%. (2) The PVTNG, comprising 75 l of PVT scintillator complemented with PVC panels, exhibited a neutron sensitivity of 1.9 cps/ng of 252Cf, thus almost meeting the corresponding requirement for Radiation Portal Monitors. Moreover, an unconventional construction of scintillator and light readout, combined with innovative electronics and proper detector stabilization, improved the gamma detector performance noticeably and enabled nuclide identification. © 2012 Copyright Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).


Plettner C.,FLIR Radiation GmbH | Scherwinski F.,FLIR Radiation GmbH | Pausch G.,FLIR Radiation GmbH | Lentering R.,FLIR Radiation GmbH | And 4 more authors.
IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record | Year: 2012

To conclude, the production of new instruments based on the CLYC scintillator has been initiated at FLIR Radiation GmbH. As a manufacturer of digital instruments for in-field applications, our main concern is the temperature mapping of all detector characteristics. To understand the key properties of these detectors, spectroscopic measurements with analog electronics were carried out, at RT and in the -20°C to +55°C temperature range. At all temperatures, gamma/neutron pulse shapes varied among the crystal samples. For each detector, the pulse shape differences between neutron and gamma signals were significant and allowed pulse shape discrimination. The energy resolution reached its optimum value at 2 or 4 μs, depending on the crystal specimen, and it has been found to stay almost constant in the +5°C to +55°C temperature range, which is indeed an important feature for in-field applications. The energy resolution slightly deteriorates at low temperatures. The thermal neutron sensitivity has been found to be comparable to the typically used 3He detectors. The neutron and gamma wave forms were mapped as a function of temperature. Pulse shape discrimination based on the decay times works at best at -20°C and room temperature and may encounter difficulties at 50°C, since the neutron effective times become close to that of gammas. An alternative and powerful tool is to inspect the neutron-gamma rise times. At 50°C the neutrons effective rise times become slower than the gammas, and slower than the neutron effective rise times at -20°C, and this is the key for discriminating this class of events at high temperatures. This effect is, to our knowledge observed for the first time, and of course, future experiments have to confirm it © 2012 IEEE.


Trademark
FLIR Radiation GmbH | Date: 2012-11-27

Handheld spectroscopic nuclear detection instruments, detectors for the measurement of nuclear radiation, including alpha, beta and gamma radiation, x-rays and neutrons; photomultipliers and multi channel analyzers; data processing equipment and computers for the detection of radiation.


Trademark
FLIR Radiation GmbH | Date: 2012-11-06

Handheld spectroscopic nuclear detection instruments, detectors for the measurement of nuclear radiation, including alpha, beta and gamma radiation, x-rays and neutrons; photomultipliers and multi channel analyzers; data processing equipment and computers for the detection of radiation.


Trademark
FLIR Radiation GmbH | Date: 2012-11-06

Handheld spectroscopic nuclear detection instruments, detectors for the measurement of nuclear radiation, including alpha, beta and gamma radiation, x-rays and neutrons; photomultipliers and multi channel analyzers; data processing equipment and computers for the detection of radiation.


Patent
FLIR Radiation GmbH | Date: 2010-11-29

A method for correctly identifying at least one source, in particular at least one nuclide, enclosed in a human body and/or a container, is provided, the method comprising the following steps: detecting and measuring the at least one source by means of a gamma spectroscopic device; identifying, in a first estimation step, the at least one source by means of a standard nuclide identification procedure for evaluating a measured first spectrum of the at least one source; applying a second estimation step on the basis of the result of the first estimation step, wherein the result of the first estimation step is used for acquiring a plurality of second spectra of the at least one source found by the standard nuclide identification procedure for a plurality of absorption scenarios and for a plurality of scattering scenarios; and comparing the measured first spectrum with a scatter and absorber spectrum obtained from the plurality of second spectra generated in the second estimation step.

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