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News Article | February 4, 2017
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

REEVES COUNTY, TEXAS — Travelers crossing the long stretch of arid desert spanning West Texas might stumble across an extraordinarily improbable sight — a tiny teeming wetlands, a sliver of marsh that seems like it should sit by the ocean but actually lays over 450 miles from the nearest coast. This cienega, or desert-wetlands (an ecosystem so unusual that its name sounds like a contradiction), lies instead near a massive swimming pool and lake, all fed by clusters of freshwater springs that include the deepest underwater cave ever discovered in the U.S., stretching far under the desert’s dry sands. Famous as “the oasis of West Texas,” Balmorhea State Park now hosts over 150,000 visitors a year, drawn by the chance to swim in the cool waters of the park’s crystal-blue pool, which is fed by up to 28 million gallons of water a day flowing from the San Solomon springs. The pool’s steady 72 to 76 degree Fahrenheit temperatures make the waters temptingly cool in the hot Texas summer and surprisingly warm in the winter, locals say — part of the reason it’s been called “the crown jewel of the desert.” This remote locale also boasts some of America’s darkest night skies, allowing scientists and tourists alike to peer at far-off galaxies and to closely examine distant parts of the universe through the powerful telescopes at the nearby McDonald Observatory. Iconic Texas wildlife — diamondback rattlesnakes, road-runners, and javelina — stir in the underbrush. And they’re not alone. Unique animals, including multiple endangered species, have adapted specifically to live in or near these springs’ desert waters, which in recent years have not only kept tourism thriving but also irrigated fields of crops and provided drinking water for the roughly 500 residents of Balmorhea, Reeves County, Texas. The wild desert surrounding the springs here looks virtually nothing like it does further east, in the Permian Basin, where the oil industry has been in the midst of the nation’s biggest shale drilling frenzy. Drivers on the interstate can smell oil in the air before they even see the oilfields outside Midland, Texas. From the mesquite and cactus-dotted plains atop the Permian Basin, over 2 million barrels of oil a day are pumped out of the ground. Dense fields of thousands of oil pump-jacks line roadsides, extracting fossil fuel from wells that are sometimes less than a football field apart. But attempts to drill for oil here by the oasis at the foot of the Davis mountain range usually turned up dry holes. Until now. In September, Apache Corp. announced a major new oil and gas find in Reeves County, a claimed $80 billion discovery that could turn the region’s fate on its head. This has locals, who have seen what happens to people’s air, water, and communities when deserts are transformed into oil fields, worried. “I just wanted y’all to see it before it happens,” said Paul Matta, 47, a school board member who works for the local housing authority and suspects his way of life will disappear with the arrival of heavy industry in his quiet town, a grid of brightly painted homes, tourist shops, and a single restaurant. Paul Matta surveys Lake Balmorhea near Balmorhea State Park. In the distance, an orange flare on a recently constructed wellpad burns. Photo Credit: Laura Evangelisto, © 2016. The prospect of allowing thousands of wells to be fracked where water is so scarce raises fundamental questions about what natural resources Americans are willing to sacrifice in the pursuit of fracked oil and gas, Matta and other Balmorhea locals say. Though the drilling industry long denied that fracking puts water wells at risk of contamination, a major EPA study released in December concluded that drilling and fracking can pose serious risks to people’s drinking water, and has already left some of the country’s water supplies “unusable.” In many ways, the risks Balmorhea’s wild areas now face have been previewed in wildernesses around the world. “The amount of wilderness loss in just two decades is staggering,” Dr. Oscar Venter of the University of Northern British Colombia told National Geographic in 2016. Dr. Venter authored a study concluding that in the past two decades, the world lost 23 percent of its wilderness areas. “We need to recognize that wilderness areas, which we’ve foolishly considered to be de-facto protected due to their remoteness, is actually being dramatically lost around the world.” Ask a local here what makes their region unique and the facts start spilling out. There’s the nearby Marfa lights, which have drawn conspiracy theorists and UFO enthusiasts for decades, and the tiny church building where, local legend has it, Dillinger hid out from the feds in the 1930s. The endangered Comanche Springs Pupfish swims with Pecos gambusia, another endangered fish species, in Balmorhea State Park’s spring-fed pool. Photo Credit: Laura Evangelisto, © 2016. There’s the Phantom Cave springs, where divers probed depths of over 462 feet in 2013, marking the springs as the deepest underwater cave ever discovered in the U.S. (divers were forced to turn back not because they touched bottom, but because their equipment was at its limits). There’s the Comanche Springs Pupfish, a two-inch endangered fish named for its puppy-like behaviors, that can only be found in Balmorhea State Park’s springs (ever since nearby Comanche Springs went dry in 1955) — meaning that swimmers at the spring-fed pool share the waters with hundreds of tiny fish found nowhere else in the world. Even the rocks here can surprise you — pick up an ordinary-looking pebble here, break it open, and you might find a Balmorhea Blue agate, a blue-gray-white swirl of volcanic rock inside a brownish crust. These agates are a tangible hint that (unlike most shale oil and gas prospects), Alpine High lies in the foothills of a volcanic rock formation. The sharp cliffs of the Davis Mountains were formed by volcanic eruptions over 25 million years ago. These days, it’s not volcanic eruptions but blazing natural gas flares that light up the evening skies, so bright that from the horizon they could be mistaken for the last edge of a setting sun. A natural gas flare lights up the desert near Balmorhea. Photo Credit: Laura Evangelisto, © 2016. The flares accompanied the earliest stages of the drilling which Apache plans for here. The company estimates that it will pump over 3 billion barrels of oil from the field, which it dubbed Alpine High, at $50 a barrel, plus 75 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. To put that in context, the industry predicts about three times as much oil and gas from the Marcellus Shale — but that prospect stretches across roughly 90,000 square miles, including most of Pennsylvania and into other states, including New York, West Virginia, and Ohio. By contrast, Apache’s Alpine High acreage represents roughly 500 square miles of land, and the oil and gas that the company seeks to drill lies in stacked layers of rock formations underground. “This really is a giant onion that is going to take us years and years to peel back and uncover,” Apache’s Chief Executive Officer John Christmann told analysts at a Barclays conference in September. Energy industry analysts have been abuzz about the discovery, marketed as the biggest find of 2016. “How important is it?” Andrew McConn, a Wood Mackenzie analyst, said to the Houston Chronicle in December. “I’d say very important.” In September, Apache announced it had leased more than 300,000 acres of continuous parcels of land in the Alpine High prospect, allowing it to drill 3,000 or more oil and gas wells in Reeves County. So far, a relatively small number of wells have been drilled and fracked — less than a dozen as of August 2016. For Paul Matta, Apache’s arrival has already brought a series of nagging worries, not just concern that drilling accidents and chemical spills could contaminate the region’s unique springs, but also the risk that the water-thirsty process of fracking will parch the springs dry. He also fears that seismic activity, whether from earthquakes or simply heavy machinery and industrial activity, could shift the spring’s underground geology, stopping the water from naturally flowing to the surface. Apache has promised to “minimize” its use of fresh spring water during drilling and fracking. The company also says it will take extra steps to protect the local springs, including a plan to refrain from drilling under the state park and town, even though it has leased the oil and gas rights there. The driller is also funding research to document the current state of the area’s water and is working with the local observatory to try and keep light pollution down, company spokesperson Castlen Kennedy told DeSmog. “Alpine High is a multi-decade commitment for Apache Corp. as is the protection and well being of the surrounding communities,” she said in an email. The company’s promises were met with skepticism in Balmorhea. “Apache says they’re going to transport in brackish water but — from where?,” said Matta, gesturing towards the desert around him. “Who’s going to monitor that?” It’s no secret that the oil and gas industry wields enormous political power here in Texas — leaving residents with little reassurance that their town and its environment will be protected. “People just say, oh well, that’s Texas, and they don’t report on it,” Sharon Wilson, an organizer with Earthworks, told DeSmog, “but there is a lot of opposition to the oil and gas industry in Texas.” And what happens out in this corner of Texas — so remote that locals say they make the multi-hour trek out to a grocery store just once a month — not only could put locals at risk, it could also affect the entire planet’s fate. In October, Earthworks visited Reeves County and recorded plumes of methane leaking out of tanks, compressor stations, and drilling sites, using a special FLIR camera to reveal the normally invisible gas clouds. Methane, a greenhouse gas that’s 86 times more powerful than carbon dioxide, has scientists warning that leaks from oil and gas equipment could release enough greenhouse gases that relying on natural gas instead of coal for electricity might be a step backwards for the climate. And in Texas, environmentalists say that little is being done by state regulators to curb the oil industry’s methane leaks. “It doesn’t matter what rules they make in Colorado or even federal rules to stop all the methane blasting into the air, Texas doesn’t abide by that,” Wilson said. “Whatever any other state does, it’s nothing like what I’ve seen in Texas.” From metal rocking chairs on their front porch, Neta and Darrel Rhyne sat with Paul Matta and mulled over the fate of Balmorhea in the face of Apache’s arrival. “I’ve been in a hot air balloon, and we went up and so you see Phantom Springs, San Solomon Springs, Giffen Springs, and you see all of the water flowing towards town off of these two springs,” said Neta, “and it’s just amazing, in the Chihuahua Desert that we have this.” The two run a SCUBA shop near the state park, supplying gear to tourists who visit from around the world to dive the local springs and to brush shoulders with an increasingly rare way of life. Neta Rhyne sits on the porch in front of the dive shop she runs with her husband Darrel near Balmorhea State Park. Photo Credit: Laura Evangelisto, © 2016. “West Texas,” said Neta, “to tourists, West Texas is the cowboy and the old west and it’s really the — this is really the only place that’s not been touched.” Apache has said it plans to drill 3,000 or more wells to tap the Alpine Heights oilfield. “And talk about the infrastructure that has to come along with 3,000 wells, ” said Neta. “You got to have man camps, you have to have roads, you have to have transportation to haul out what you’re pumping out. You have to feed these people. How the — where are they going to do that? It doesn’t exist right now. So what kind of footprint are they going to be bringing to this desert oasis?” Drilling and fracking could harm the springs many different ways, an in-depth analysis commissioned by Earthworks concluded in November. The researchers found threats were posed by spills, underground migration of gas or chemicals, and changes to the artesian pressures underground. The Rhynes worry that if the water here goes bad, they will face a nearly impossible battle to hold the driller accountable. A researcher from a nearby university had offered to conduct water tests, but then gave media interviews supporting Apache, causing the couple to worry that his loyalty might lie with the company if a legal dispute arose. Independently testing their four water wells before drilling started would cost $55,000, the couple was told. “That’s a lot of money,” Neta said. “I mean, where do working class folks like us go to get this?” Even if they could afford it, there’s little guarantee that independent water tests would cover whatever problems might emerge. “Nobody knows the chemicals they’re using,” Neta said. “They don’t even have to tell the regulatory agencies what chemicals they’re using. So how — how do you protect yourself? It just — everything is in favor of the oil and against us. Everything.” “It’s kind of like Balmorhea is not going to have much of a voice,” added Darrel. “You know, it’s a very small rural community of probably 90 percent Hispanic or other minorities.” The oil industry in Texas has a history of problems with environmental racism, with one study last year finding that fracking wastewater wells were disproportionately concentrated in low-income and Hispanic neighborhoods in Texas’ Eagle Ford shale region. Born in Oklahoma and Texas respectively, Neta and Darrel grew up around the oil industry, living together in an area called “refinery row” in the early 1980s. Then in 1984 Darrel was appointed manager of the state park, and he and Neta moved out to the desert. “Really at that time, we thought it was just a step with the park service,” Darrel said, explaining that they had lived along the coastline but once they arrived in the Balmorhea desert, they didn’t want to leave. “We moved out here and we feel like we hit home, we found home.” But putting down roots in Balmorhea was more than just a career move — Neta credits the clean air here with saving her life. “I had lung cancer in ’92,” Neta explained. “I was — used to be a smoker. And they gave me two months to live.” Over twenty years later, that lung cancer has yet to return. “My oncologist still shakes his head, and says ‘I don’t know why you’re here, but …’” Neta said with a laugh. The night skies of West Texas may soon face more light pollution as drilling and flaring extend further into the desert. Photo Credit: Laura Evangelisto, © 2016. “The clean air, you know, I felt safe staying here,” she explained. “Because we don’t have the pollution, we have clean air, we have beautiful dark skies, and well that’s — that’s gone now. It’s already gone, and they’ve just started.” That loss seemed to sit heavy on Neta’s shoulders. “This is our livelihood, this is our home, this is where we planned for all of our future generations to live and exist,” she said. “Now what? It’s going to be turned into a desert wasteland, a dust bowl before they’re done — and how do you live with that? How do you accept that? And how do you live with the fact there’s not anything you can do about it?” “I don’t know,” she said. “I haven’t figured that out yet.” For now, the couple is instead working on figuring out how to prevent Balmorhea from turning into little more than another oil field. They’ve helped form a grassroots group called Save Our Springs Too and organized community meetings for locals to learn about drilling and to discuss the risks posed. In late December, the Rhynes announced that they would welcome those concerned about fracking around Balmorhea and neighboring Toyahvale, Texas, to come visit and to camp out on their land. “We’re going to get Toyahvale on the map, finally,” Neta told the Houston Chronicle. “Wish it were for better reasons.”


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

BARCELONA, Spain, Feb. 27, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- DJI, the world leader in unmanned aerial technology, Sunday unveiled the new Matrice 200 drone series (M200), which is purpose-built for professional users to perform aerial inspections and collect data – making drone technology an affordable and easy-to-use tool for enterprises that recognize how aerial imaging can transform their operations. The M200 series' folding body is easy to carry and easy to set up, with a weather- and water-resistant body, ideal for field operations. It offers DJI's first upward-facing gimbal mount, opening up the undersides of bridges, towers and other structures to inspection. It is compatible with DJI's powerful X4S and X5S cameras, as well as the high-powered Z30 zoom camera and the XT camera for thermal imaging. It has a forward-facing first-person view camera, allowing a pilot and a camera operator to monitor separate images on dual controllers. Its safety features include obstacle avoidance sensors facing forward, up and down, as well as an ADS-B receiver for advisory traffic information from nearby manned aircraft. With a dual battery set-up, the M200 platform can fly for up to 35 minutes with a mounted camera. "Drones have quickly become a standard part of the enterprise toolkit and industrial users have come to rely on DJI technology to efficiently collect aerial data," said Paul Guo, Director Enterprise Solutions at DJI. "With the M200 series, DJI introduces a holistic solution designed specifically for these users. We are revolutionizing professional workflows by making it possible to use advanced sensors in various combinations to make sophisticated tasks such as bridge inspections, land surveying and search-and-rescue missions, easier, safer and more reliable than ever before." The M200 series is designed for professionals using drones for more precise, efficient and safe aerial data collection. Examples of industry applications include: More information about the M200's applications is available here: http://www.dji.com/matrice-200-series/applications Standard and Pro versions The M200 series comes in three versions. The standard M200 is equipped with one downward-facing gimbal mount. The M210 opens up for multiple payload configurations – one single downward facing gimbal mount, two parallel downward-facing gimbal mounts or one upward-facing gimbal mount. The M210 features additional connectivity ports to support third party sensors and accessories. The M210 has the capability to support additional sensors in the future and additional payload can be mounted on top of the aircraft. The M210 RTK is available with D-RTK modules for centimeter-precision navigation. Unrivaled Safety and Reliability With an IP43 classification, the M200 series is built to endure adverse environments. The aircraft is equipped with more than 20 internal sensors for maximum redundancy and reliability, including compass, GPS system, dual inertial measurement units (IMUs) and three barometers. Gimbal controllers have been integrated in the aircraft body for protection and to prevent drift. The aircraft features two stereo-vision systems below and in front of the aircraft and has an upward facing infrared sensor for obstacle avoidance. A redundant battery system improves safety and also allows the craft to stay powered while batteries are swapped in sequence. The M200 series features DJI AirSense, a built-in ADS-B receiver, enhancing airspace safety by automatically providing the operator with real-time information about the position, altitude, and velocity of nearby manned aircraft equipped with ADS-B transmitters. AirSense enables safer and more efficient use of airspace, particularly in locations where other manned aircraft may be operating. The M200 series is also equipped with an integrated flight controller, featuring two IMUs and a GNSS unit, with additional analytical redundancy systems. Working together with advanced diagnostic algorithms, it can seamlessly switch from one IMU to the other to maintain reliability and precision. DJI Flight Management In addition to the DJI GO 4 app, the M200 series supports the brand new DJI Pilot app, which is specifically designed for enterprise users, optimizing user experience and flight performance. Users can also plan flights through DJI's GS Pro app, which uses a clear and concise interface to establish complex flight missions with just a few taps. The M200 series is compatible with DJI's Mobile and Onboard Software Development Kit (SDK), enabling programmers to build customized solutions for flight planning, data collection and analysis. The DJI Pilot app is compatible with DJI FlightHub™, a web-based software package allowing teams to share real-time data with offsite parties over the Internet. This includes remote emergency situation control rooms keeping track of first response teams or asset management centers inspecting global infrastructure networks. In an easy-to-use control center, DJI FlightHub lets users plan flights with multiple drones and keep track of each aircraft's status. An offsite control room can simultaneously monitor live feeds and can remotely control gimbal and camera. The software enables managers to plan flights in advance using waypoints and dynamic geofencing. Intelligent Flight Features The M200 series' computer vision enables intelligent flight modes to help with data collection. These features are available for multiple DJI sensors, enabling advanced shots such as zooming while tracking an object: Accessories The M200 series pairs with DJI Goggles, displaying an 85-degree view from the drone in full 1080p for a bird's-eye view of the world below. The M200 series uses DJI's powerful Lightbridge 2 system, supporting a range up to 4.3 miles (7 km) where, allowed by local laws and regulations, at live view resolutions up to 1080p. The master and slave controller range extends to 328 feet and users can switch between 2.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz frequencies to cut through any noise for greater signal stability. The M200 series offers two battery versions – a standard 95 Wh version and a more powerful version of 174 Wh with flight time of up to 38 minutes. M200 payloads The M200 series enables three different payload configurations – one downward-facing camera (M200), two downward-facing cameras (M210) and / or one upward-facing cameras (M210). DJI's updated series of Zenmuse cameras is optimized for aerial imaging and communicates directly with the aircraft's gimbal and flight controllers. For situations that require a balance between weight and image quality, the Zenmuse X4S has a 1-inch, 20-megapixel sensor with 11.6 stops of dynamic range and a 24 mm equivalent focal length. The Zenmuse X4S offers aperture control (f2.8-11) and a mechanical shutter capable of 1/2000 shutter speeds, eliminating rolling shutter distortion when taking images of fast-moving subjects or when flying at high speed. The Zenmuse X5S has a larger Micro Four Thirds sensor with 20.8 megapixels and 12.8 stops of dynamic range, and supports eight lenses from wide angles to zooms. DJI's Zenmuse XT, powered by FLIR, provides high-sensitivity thermal imaging ideal for analytics and telemetry. DJI's Zenmuse Z30 is the first integrated aerial camera with an optical zoom up to 30x and digital up to 6x, making image data collection significantly faster while greatly reducing the risk of harm to both personnel and equipment. Price and Availability The M200, the M210 and the M210 RTK are available for pre-order from official DJI Enterprise dealers and will start shipping in Q2 2017. Pricing details and information on where to buy the M200 series will be announced in due course. For more information about the M200 series, please see here: http://www.dji.com/matrice-200-series/ Photos and videos of the M200 are available for download at this link: http://bit.ly/2lXFQty About DJI DJI is a global leader in developing and manufacturing innovative drone and camera technology for personal and professional use. DJI was founded and is run by people with a passion for remote-controlled helicopters and experts in flight-control technology and camera stabilization. The company is dedicated to making aerial photography and filmmaking equipment and platforms more accessible, reliable and easier to use for creators and innovators around the world. DJI's global operations currently span across the Americas, Europe and Asia, and its revolutionary products and solutions have been chosen by customers in over 100 countries for applications in filmmaking, construction, emergency response, agriculture, conservation and many other industries. For more information, visit our website: http://enterprise.dji.com  Follow DJI Enterprise on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DjiEnterprise Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: www.youtube.com/DJI


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

President and CEO Andrew Teich to Retire After 33 Years of Service; Teich to Remain CEO while Board Conducts Search Process WILSONVILLE, OR--(Marketwired - Feb 14, 2017) - FLIR Systems, Inc. ( : FLIR) today announced that Andrew C. Teich, its President, Chief Executive Officer and a member of its Board of Directors, plans to retire after 33 years of service. Mr. Teich will continue to serve in his current roles until a successor is appointed. As part of FLIR's succession planning process, the Board will conduct a comprehensive search for a new CEO. FLIR has retained Korn Ferry International, a leading executive search firm, to assist in the search process. "Nearly 34 years ago, I saw my first thermal camera and I immediately knew it would change the world," said Mr. Teich. "I feel incredibly fortunate to have had the opportunity to help pioneer the commercialization and global adoption of this technology alongside some of the most talented people in the industry. It has been a deeply rewarding experience, both personally and professionally. Having shipped over a half million thermal cameras in 2016, I am proud of all that we have accomplished and know that FLIR is well-positioned for continued success. I am confident that our next CEO and the rest of the outstanding leadership team will continue to build on the important progress we have made. I look forward to continuing to lead the company in the near-term and working with the Board to ensure a seamless transition." "Andy has been a strong leader for FLIR, and we are grateful for his accomplishments during his 33 years of dedicated service," said Earl R. Lewis, Chairman of the FLIR Board of Directors. "As CEO, Andy helped take FLIR's business to a new level by, among other accomplishments, leading the expansion of our product offerings, entering new markets and completing key strategic acquisitions. We look forward to continuing to work with Andy while we conduct a thoughtful search process and lay the foundation for a smooth transition." Mr. Lewis continued, "Succession planning has always been important to the Board, and we are focused on identifying a strong leader who has a record of driving positive financial results and who shares our vision of leveraging the unique attributes of the FLIR brand and product portfolio. The right candidate will continue to execute on our strategy and build on Andy and our team's success." Mr. Teich joined FLIR in March 1999 after it acquired Inframetrics, where Mr. Teich worked as a pioneer in the commercialization of thermal imaging technology since 1984. In his career at FLIR, Mr. Teich continued to drive the adoption of thermal technology across Military, Industrial and Consumer markets. Mr. Teich has served as President and CEO of FLIR since May 2013 and as a member of the Board of Directors since July 2013. During his tenure as CEO, FLIR grew annual revenue to more than $1.6 billion by introducing new product platforms across FLIR's six segments; completed five strategic acquisitions that expanded FLIR's product portfolio and capabilities; developed revolutionary new technologies and successfully brought them to market; and significantly increased its intellectual property portfolio. In a separate release today, the company also announced its fourth quarter and full fiscal year 2016 earnings results. The company has scheduled a conference call at 11:00 a.m. ET (8:00 a.m. PT) today to discuss its results for the quarter and full year. FLIR Systems, Inc. is a world leader in the design, manufacture, and marketing of sensor systems that enhance perception and awareness. FLIR's advanced thermal imaging and threat detection systems are used for a wide variety of imaging, thermography, and security applications, including airborne and ground-based surveillance, condition monitoring, research and development, manufacturing process control, search and rescue, drug interdiction, navigation, transportation safety, border and maritime patrol, environmental monitoring, and chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosives (CBRNE) detection. For more information, go to FLIR's web site at www.FLIR.com.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Fourth Quarter and Full Year Revenue Growth of 8% and 7%; Fourth Quarter and Full Year Operating Cash Flow Growth of 24% and 13%; Quarterly Dividend Increased 25% to $0.15 Per Share WILSONVILLE, OR--(Marketwired - Feb 14, 2017) - FLIR Systems, Inc. ( : FLIR) today announced financial results for the fourth quarter and full year ended December 31, 2016. Fourth quarter 2016 revenue was $474.7 million, up 8% compared to fourth quarter 2015 revenue of $437.6 million. GAAP operating income in the fourth quarter was $92.3 million, compared to $93.5 million in the fourth quarter of 2015. Fourth quarter 2016 GAAP net income was $61.5 million, or $0.45 per diluted share, compared with GAAP net income of $70.2 million, or $0.51 per diluted share in the fourth quarter a year ago. Cash provided by operations in the fourth quarter reached $97.1 million, FLIR's highest quarterly cash flow since 2013, which was driven largely by continued improvements in working capital. Excluding the impact of discrete tax items, cost-basis investment gains and losses, restructuring charges, SkyWatch™ remediation charges, and the impact of fourth quarter 2016 acquisitions, fourth quarter historical-method adjusted earnings per share were $0.48, compared to historical-method adjusted earnings per share of $0.47 in the fourth quarter of 2015. Full year 2016 historical-method adjusted earnings per share were $1.56, equal to historical-method adjusted earnings per share for 2015. A reconciliation table summarizing historical-method adjustments is below under the heading: "GAAP to Non-GAAP Reconciliation -- As Previously Guided." Moving forward, in addition to GAAP results, FLIR will provide new non-GAAP adjusted earnings metrics. These new metrics remove certain non-core items (including gains and losses) that FLIR management believes are not reflective of ongoing operating performance, such as restructuring charges, gains and losses on disposal of non-core assets, discrete tax items, business acquisition-related expenses, and amortization expense related to acquired intangible assets. FLIR management believes these new adjusted earnings metrics provide a view of the Company's core operating results and facilitate consistent comparison of financial results over time. A reconciliation table summarizing the adjustments to the 2016 financial results for the fourth quarter and full year 2016 and 2015 is provided below. A reconciliation of quarterly results for 2016 and 2015 will be provided in the summary presentation that accompanies FLIR's fourth quarter results conference call, available in the Events & Presentations section of www.FLIR.com/investor. Adjusted operating income in the fourth quarter of 2016 was $103.3 million, compared to $98.7 million in the fourth quarter of 2015. Fourth quarter 2016 adjusted net income was $71.9 million, or $0.52 per diluted share, compared with adjusted net income of $69.6 million, or $0.50 per diluted share in the fourth quarter of 2015. Revenue from the Surveillance segment was $158.5 million, an increase of 5% from fourth quarter results last year. The Instruments segment contributed $96 million of revenue during the fourth quarter, down 3% from the prior year. The Security segment recorded revenue of $73.1 million in the fourth quarter, up 7% over the prior year. FLIR's OEM & Emerging Markets segment had $76.1 million of revenue, an increase of 55% over the prior year due partially to the addition of the acquired Intelligent Imaging Solutions business as well as strong camera cores demand. Revenue from the Maritime segment was $38.3 million, which increased 6% compared to the fourth quarter of 2015. The Detection segment contributed $32.7 million of revenue, a decline of 6% versus the prior year. For the full year, revenue was $1,662.2 million, up 7% compared to $1,557.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. GAAP operating income for 2016 was $295.7 million, compared to $305.8 million in 2015. Adjusted operating income for 2016 was $324.7 million, compared to 2015 adjusted operating income of $325.0 million. GAAP net income for 2016 was $166.6 million, or $1.20 per diluted share, which compares to 2015 GAAP net income of $241.7 million, or $1.72 per diluted share. Adjusted net income in 2016 was $233.9 million, or $1.69 per diluted share, which compares to 2015 adjusted net income of $232.8 million, or $1.65 per diluted share. Cash provided by operations during 2016 was $312.3 million, which compares to $275.8 million in the prior year and represents a 13% increase. FLIR's backlog of firm orders for delivery within the next twelve months was approximately $592 million as of December 31, 2016, a decrease of $52 million, or 8%, during the quarter and a decrease of $12 million, or 2%, below the $604 million balance at the end of 2015. "We are pleased with the progress we have made in building our core business, the addition of the new business areas through the four acquisitions we completed this year, and our strong operating cash flow growth," said Andy Teich, President and CEO of FLIR. "While we are disappointed with this quarter's results from a margin perspective, we are confident in our ability to drive continued growth and improve margins in 2017. During 2016 we expanded our market share in nearly all of the markets we serve and built a strong backlog as a foundation for 2017. We look forward to the launch of several new product platforms in the first half of the year which should drive further growth." FLIR also announced today that it currently expects revenue in 2017 to be in the range of $1.78 billion to $1.83 billion and adjusted earnings per diluted share to be in the range of $1.81 to $1.91. This represents 7% to 10% growth in revenue and 7% to 13% growth in adjusted earnings per diluted share. FLIR's Board of Directors has approved a quarterly cash dividend of $0.15 per share on FLIR common stock, an increase of 25% over the previous quarterly dividend of $0.12 per share. The Board of Directors has declared the dividend payable on March 10, 2017, to shareholders of record as of close of business on February 24, 2017. Also today, FLIR announced that its Board of Directors approved a new share repurchase program that authorizes the repurchase of up to 15 million shares over the next two years. The number of shares authorized for repurchase represents approximately 11% of FLIR's outstanding common stock as of December 31, 2016. FLIR has scheduled a conference call at 11:00 a.m. ET (8:00 a.m. PT) today to discuss its results for the quarter and the year. A simultaneous webcast of the conference call and the accompanying summary presentation may be accessed from the Events section of www.FLIR.com/investor. A replay will be available after 2:00 p.m. ET (11:00 a.m. PT) at this same address. Summary fourth quarter and historical financial data may be accessed from the Financial Info Database link under the Financials & Filings section at www.FLIR.com/investor. FLIR Systems, Inc. is a world leader in the design, manufacture, and marketing of sensor systems that enhance perception and awareness. FLIR's advanced systems and components are used for a wide variety of thermal imaging, situational awareness, and security applications, including airborne and ground-based surveillance, condition monitoring, navigation, recreation, research and development, manufacturing process control, search and rescue, drug interdiction, transportation safety, border and maritime patrol, environmental monitoring, and chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosives (CBRNE) threat detection. For more information, visit FLIR's web site at www.FLIR.com. In addition to financial measures prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), this earnings release makes reference to non-GAAP measures. With respect to the outlook for the full year 2017, certain items that affect GAAP net income per diluted share are out of the Company's control and/or cannot be reasonably predicted. Consequently, the Company is unable to provide a reasonable estimate of GAAP net income per diluted share or a corresponding reconciliation to GAAP net income per diluted share for the full year. Additional information regarding the reasons the Company uses non-GAAP measures, a reconciliation of these measures to the most directly comparable GAAP measures, and other information relating to these measures are included below, following the GAAP financial information. Statements in this release by Andy Teich and the statements in the section captioned "Revenue and Earnings Outlook for 2017" above are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Any statements that are not statements of historical fact (including statements containing the words "believes," "plans," "anticipates," "expects," "estimates," or similar expressions) should be considered to be forward looking statements. Such statements are based on current expectations, estimates, and projections about FLIR's business based, in part, on assumptions made by management. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks and uncertainties that are difficult to predict. Therefore, actual outcomes and results may differ materially from what is expressed or forecasted in such forward-looking statements due to numerous factors, including the following: changes in demand for FLIR's products, product mix, the timing of customer orders and deliveries, the impact of competitive products and pricing, the impact of FLIR's continuing compliance with U.S. export control laws and regulations and similar laws and regulations, the timely receipt of any necessary export licenses, constraints on supplies of critical components, excess or shortage of production capacity, the ability to manufacture and ship the products in the time period required, actual purchases under agreements, the continuing eligibility of FLIR to act as a federal contractor, the amount and availability of appropriated government procurement funds and other risks discussed from time to time in filings and reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. In addition, such statements could be affected by general industry and market conditions and growth rates, and general domestic and international economic conditions. Such forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which they are made and FLIR does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this release, or for changes made to this document by wire services or internet service providers. We report our financial results in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). As a supplement to our GAAP financial results, this earnings announcement contains some or all of the following non-GAAP financial measures: (i) adjusted gross profit, (ii) adjusted gross margin (defined as adjusted gross profit divided by revenue), (iii) adjusted operating income, (iv) adjusted operating margin (defined as adjusted operating income divided by revenue), (v) adjusted net income, and (vi) adjusted earnings per diluted share (EPS). These non-GAAP measures of financial performance are not prepared in accordance with GAAP and computational methods may differ from those used by other companies. Additionally, these non-GAAP measures should not be considered a substitute for any other performance measure determined in accordance with GAAP and the Company cautions investors and potential investors to consider these measures in addition to, not as a substitute for, its consolidated financial results as presented in accordance with GAAP. Each of the non-GAAP measures is adjusted from GAAP results and are outlined in the "GAAP to Non-GAAP Reconciliation" tables included within this earnings release. In calculating non-GAAP financial measures, we exclude certain items (including gains and losses) to facilitate a review of the comparability of our core operating performance on a period-to-period basis. The excluded items represent amortization of acquired intangible assets, purchase accounting adjustments, restructuring charges, acquisition related expenses, gains and losses on cost-basis investments, discrete tax items, and other items we do not consider to be directly related to our core operating performance. We use non-GAAP measures internally to evaluate the core operating performance of our business, for comparison with forecasts and strategic plans and for calculating return on investment. Accordingly, supplementing GAAP financial results with these non-GAAP financial measures enables the comparison of our ongoing operating results in a manner consistent with the metrics reviewed by management. We believe that these non-GAAP measures, when read in conjunction with our GAAP financials, provide useful information to investors by facilitating: The following are explanations of each type of adjustment that we incorporate into non-GAAP financial measures:


SINGAPORE, Feb. 24, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- The condition monitoring equipment market in the Asia-Pacific region is set for transformation during the next five years. Converging technology such as Big Data and the Industrial Internet of Things will create new business opportunities, while assured revenues via supplier-offered proprietary systems will ignite growth. To seize growth opportunities, companies specializing in a particular product or technology must seek out collaborative partnership strategies or acquire existing solution providers who have the right mix of condition monitoring technology, expertise and service capabilities. "A large share of condition monitoring systems, especially the software, is proprietary and has advanced capabilities. End users usually work with the same brand or supplier for upgrades and further testing. To assure current revenues, suppliers must offer quality products and customer-centric services," said Frost & Sullivan Industrial Automation and Process Control Industry Analyst Krishnan Ramanathan. Asia-Pacific Condition Monitoring Equipment Market, Forecast to 2020, recent analysis from Frost & Sullivan's Industrial Automation and Process Control Growth Partnership Services, finds that the total condition monitoring equipment market in Asia-Pacific was worth US$430.8 million in 2015 and is expected to reach US$514.8 million by 2020. The study provides analysis of the types of condition monitoring techniques and systems deployed across the Asia-Pacific region. It discusses key drivers, restraints, major suppliers, trends, technologies and success factors. Industry participants are profiled with a separate section for each product type. Click here for complimentary access to more information on this analysis and to register for a Growth Strategy Dialogue, a free interactive briefing with Frost & Sullivan's thought leaders. SKF, Emerson, Rockwell Automation, FLIR, Bruel & Kjaer, PRUFTECHNIK, and Parker Hannifin are long-standing companies that differentiate their product offerings via strategies such as  maintenance/repair support, technology, additional training and performance. Advanced technologies such as electrical signature analysis are increasing the deployment of condition monitoring systems across industries due to a low total cost of ownership. "Many alliances are emerging between automation vendors, information and communication technology (ICT) vendors, and telecom providers to gain a share of the emerging machine-to-machine (M2M) market that predominantly benefits asset management. Companies adopting new technologies such as cloud-based asset management will gain prominence," notes Ramanathan. Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today's market participants. For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Contact us: Start the discussion


Advanced FLIR M100 and M200 Thermal Cameras and Axiom Multifunction Displays Transform Boaters' View Above and Below the Waterline WILSONVILLE, OR--(Marketwired - Feb 15, 2017) - FLIR Systems, Inc. ( : FLIR) announced two new compact additions to its popular M-Series marine thermal cameras for recreational boating, the FLIR M100 and M200, and introduced its latest generation of Raymarine® multifunction displays (MFDs). The M100 and M200 thermal cameras provide enhanced awareness while fishing, sailing, or cruising at night. The Raymarine Axiom™ MFDs include built-in RealVision 3D™ sonar powered by the Raymarine Lighthouse 3 operating system. FLIR's most compact pan-and-tilt marine thermal cameras to date, the FLIR M100 and M200 are engineered with FLIR's Boson™ high-performance thermal camera core, which features an integrated multi-core video processor that delivers superior image quality and artificial intelligence features. When the M100 and M200 are combined with a Raymarine Axiom MFD, users can take advantage of FLIR's new ClearCruise™ intelligent thermal analytics that brings boaters an advanced level of awareness and safety by visually and audibly alerting the operator when "non-water" objects such as boats, obstacles, or navigation markers are identified in the scene. The Raymarine Axiom family of MFDs feature lifelike imagery behind Raymarine's exclusive RealVision 3D for superior underwater fish and structure identification. The new rugged, all-glass touch screens are available in 7-, 9-, and 12-inch display sizes and come pre-installed with Raymarine's new LightHouse 3 operating system. Combined with Axiom's fast quad core processor, LightHouse 3 delivers an intuitive and powerful navigation experience through a redesigned interface that is easy to personalize. "Our latest Raymarine and thermal innovations are game changers for boaters," said FLIR President and CEO Andy Teich. "With simplified operation, unique RealVision 3D sonar, and our advanced ClearCruise object identification technology, users have the ability to see more, know more, and operate more safely on the water." The new line of M-Series thermal cameras and Raymarine Axiom MFD's will make their debut at the Miami International Boat Show in Miami, Florida, February 16-20. Prices for the Raymarine Axiom MFD Series range from $649.99 to $3,349.99 and the new FLIR M-series thermal cameras start at $2,499.99. These products will be available at the end of the first quarter of 2017 through FLIR's network of Raymarine and FLIR Maritime dealers. For more information on these products, please visit www.flir.com/marine. About FLIR Systems FLIR Systems, Inc. is a world leader in the design, manufacture, and marketing of sensor systems that enhance perception and awareness. FLIR's advanced systems and components are used for a wide variety of thermal imaging, situational awareness, and security applications, including airborne and ground-based surveillance, condition monitoring, navigation, recreation, research and development, manufacturing process control, search and rescue, drug interdiction, transportation safety, border and maritime patrol, environmental monitoring, and chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosives (CBRNE) threat detection. For more information, visit FLIR's web site at www.FLIR.com. About Raymarine: Raymarine, a world leader in marine electronics, develops and manufactures the most comprehensive range of electronic equipment for the recreational boating and light commercial marine markets. Designed for high performance and ease of use, the award-winning products are available through a global network of dealers and distributors. The Raymarine product lines include radar, autopilots, GPS, instruments, fishfinders, communications, and integrated systems. Raymarine is a division of FLIR Systems, a world leader in thermal imaging. For more information about Raymarine please go to www.raymarine.com. Forward-Looking Statements The statements in this release by Andy Teich and the other statements in this release about the product described above are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements are based on current expectations, estimates, and projections about FLIR's business based, in part, on assumptions made by management. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks and uncertainties that are difficult to predict. Therefore, actual outcomes and results may differ materially from what is expressed or forecasted in such forward-looking statements due to numerous factors, including the following: the ability to manufacture and deliver the systems referenced in this release, changes in pricing of FLIR's products, changing demand for FLIR's products, product mix, the impact of competitive products and pricing, constraints on supplies of critical components, excess or shortage of production capacity, the ability of FLIR to manufacture and ship products in a timely manner, FLIR's continuing compliance with U.S. export control laws and regulations, and other risks discussed from time to time in FLIR's Securities and Exchange Commission filings and reports. In addition, such statements could be affected by general industry and market conditions and growth rates, and general domestic and international economic conditions. Such forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which they are made and FLIR does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this release, or for changes made to this document by wire services or Internet service providers.


Thermal imaging is a method of improving visibility of objects in a dark environment by detecting the objects' infrared radiation and creating an image based on that information. For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com Scope of the Report: This report focuses on the Thermal Imaging in Global market, especially in North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa. This report categorizes the market based on manufacturers, regions, type and application. Market Segment by Regions, regional analysis covers North America (USA, Canada and Mexico) Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy) Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia) South America (Brazil, Argentina, Columbia etc.) Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa) Market Segment by Applications, can be divided into Military Civil There are 15 Chapters to deeply display the global Thermal Imaging market. Chapter 2, to analyze the top manufacturers of Thermal Imaging, with sales, revenue, and price of Thermal Imaging, in 2016 and 2017; Chapter 3, to display the competitive situation among the top manufacturers, with sales, revenue and market share in 2016 and 2017; Chapter 4, to show the global market by regions, with sales, revenue and market share of Thermal Imaging, for each region, from 2012 to 2017; 2 Manufacturers Profiles 2.1 FLIR 2.1.1 Business Overview 2.1.2 Thermal Imaging Type and Applications 2.1.2.1 Type 1 2.1.2.2 Type 2 2.1.3 FLIR Thermal Imaging Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.2 Lockheed Martin 2.2.1 Business Overview 2.2.2 Thermal Imaging Type and Applications 2.2.2.1 Type 1 2.2.2.2 Type 2 2.2.3 Lockheed Martin Thermal Imaging Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.3 Raytheon 2.3.1 Business Overview 2.3.2 Thermal Imaging Type and Applications 2.3.2.1 Type 1 2.3.2.2 Type 2 2.3.3 Raytheon Thermal Imaging Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.4 L3 Technologies 2.4.1 Business Overview 2.4.2 Thermal Imaging Type and Applications 2.4.2.1 Type 1 2.4.2.2 Type 2 2.4.3 L3 Technologies Thermal Imaging Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.5 Thales Group 2.5.1 Business Overview 2.5.2 Thermal Imaging Type and Applications 2.5.2.1 Type 1 2.5.2.2 Type 2 2.5.3 Thales Group Thermal Imaging Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.6 Northrop 2.6.1 Business Overview 2.6.2 Thermal Imaging Type and Applications 2.6.2.1 Type 1 2.6.2.2 Type 2 2.6.3 Northrop Thermal Imaging Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.7 BAE 2.7.1 Business Overview 2.7.2 Thermal Imaging Type and Applications 2.7.2.1 Type 1 2.7.2.2 Type 2 2.7.3 BAE Thermal Imaging Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.8 Elbit 2.8.1 Business Overview 2.8.2 Thermal Imaging Type and Applications 2.8.2.1 Type 1 2.8.2.2 Type 2 2.8.3 Elbit Thermal Imaging Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.9 DRS 2.9.1 Business Overview 2.9.2 Thermal Imaging Type and Applications 2.9.2.1 Type 1 2.9.2.2 Type 2 2.9.3 DRS Thermal Imaging Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.10 Fluke 2.10.1 Business Overview 2.10.2 Thermal Imaging Type and Applications 2.10.2.1 Type 1 2.10.2.2 Type 2 2.10.3 Fluke Thermal Imaging Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.11 Wuhan Guide 2.11.1 Business Overview 2.11.2 Thermal Imaging Type and Applications 2.11.2.1 Type 1 2.11.2.2 Type 2 2.11.3 Wuhan Guide Thermal Imaging Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.12 Guangzhou SAT 2.12.1 Business Overview 2.12.2 Thermal Imaging Type and Applications 2.12.2.1 Type 1 2.12.2.2 Type 2 2.12.3 Guangzhou SAT Thermal Imaging Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.13 Dali 2.13.1 Business Overview 2.13.2 Thermal Imaging Type and Applications 2.13.2.1 Type 1 2.13.2.2 Type 2 2.13.3 Dali Thermal Imaging Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 3 Global Thermal Imaging Market Competition, by Manufacturer 3.1 Global Thermal Imaging Sales and Market Share by Manufacturer 3.2 Global Thermal Imaging Revenue and Market Share by Manufacturer 3.3 Market Concentration Rate 3.3.1 Top 3 Thermal Imaging Manufacturer Market Share 3.3.2 Top 6 Thermal Imaging Manufacturer Market Share 3.4 Market Competition Trend For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com ABOUT US: Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe. Wise Guy Reports features an exhaustive list of market research reports from hundreds of publishers worldwide. We boast a database spanning virtually every market category and an even more comprehensive collection of rmaket research reports under these categories and sub-categories. For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

A pan–tilt–zoom camera (PTZ camera) is a camera that is capable of remote directional and zoom control. PTZ cameras make it possible to monitor large areas with a single security camera. The pan-tilt module allows you to remotely control the viewing area. Their mobile apps even give you remote control of your PTZ camera from anywhere in the world. The optical zoom feature provides the ability to focus on fine details like faces or license plates. Scope of the Report: This report focuses on the PTZ Camera in Global market, especially in North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa. This report categorizes the market based on manufacturers, regions, type and application. Market Segment by Regions, regional analysis covers North America (USA, Canada and Mexico) Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy) Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia) South America (Brazil, Argentina, Columbia etc.) Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa) Market Segment by Applications, can be divided into Public Facilities Area Industry Area Commercial Area Table of Contents 1 Market Overview 1.1 PTZ Camera Introduction 1.2 Market Analysis by Type 1.2.1 Indoor PTZ Camera 1.2.2 Outdoor PTZ Camera 1.3 Market Analysis by Applications 1.3.1 Public Facilities Area 1.3.2 Industry Area 1.3.3 Commercial Area 1.4 Market Analysis by Regions 1.4.1 North America (USA, Canada and Mexico) 1.4.1.1 USA Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.1.2 Canada Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.1.3 Mexico Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.2 Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy) 1.4.2.1 Germany Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.2.2 France Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.2.3 UK Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.2.4 Russia Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.2.5 Italy Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.3 Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia) 1.4.3.1 China Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.3.2 Japan Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.3.3 Korea Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.3.4 India Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.3.5 Southeast Asia Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.4 South America, Middle East and Africa 1.4.4.1 Brazil Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.4.2 Egypt Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.4.3 Saudi Arabia Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.4.4 South Africa Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.4.5 Nigeria Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.5 Market Dynamics 1.5.1 Market Opportunities 1.5.2 Market Risk 1.5.3 Market Driving Force 2 Manufacturers Profiles 2.1 AXIS 2.1.1 Business Overview 2.1.2 PTZ Camera Type and Applications 2.1.2.1 Type 1 2.1.2.2 Type 2 2.1.3 AXIS PTZ Camera Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.2 FLIR 2.2.1 Business Overview 2.2.2 PTZ Camera Type and Applications 2.2.2.1 Type 1 2.2.2.2 Type 2 2.2.3 FLIR PTZ Camera Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.3 Panasonic 2.3.1 Business Overview 2.3.2 PTZ Camera Type and Applications 2.3.2.1 Type 1 2.3.2.2 Type 2 2.3.3 Panasonic PTZ Camera Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.4 Honeywell 2.4.1 Business Overview 2.4.2 PTZ Camera Type and Applications 2.4.2.1 Type 1 2.4.2.2 Type 2 2.4.3 Honeywell PTZ Camera Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.5 Bosch Security Systems 2.5.1 Business Overview 2.5.2 PTZ Camera Type and Applications 2.5.2.1 Type 1 2.5.2.2 Type 2 2.5.3 Bosch Security Systems PTZ Camera Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.6 Sony 2.6.1 Business Overview 2.6.2 PTZ Camera Type and Applications 2.6.2.1 Type 1 2.6.2.2 Type 2 2.6.3 Sony PTZ Camera Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.7 Canon 2.7.1 Business Overview 2.7.2 PTZ Camera Type and Applications 2.7.2.1 Type 1 2.7.2.2 Type 2 …………. 3 Global PTZ Camera Market Competition, by Manufacturer 3.1 Global PTZ Camera Sales and Market Share by Manufacturer 3.2 Global PTZ Camera Revenue and Market Share by Manufacturer 3.3 Market Concentration Rate 3.3.1 Top 3 PTZ Camera Manufacturer Market Share 3.3.2 Top 6 PTZ Camera Manufacturer Market Share 3.4 Market Competition Trend 4 Global PTZ Camera Market Analysis by Regions 4.1 Global PTZ Camera Sales, Revenue and Market Share by Regions 4.1.1 Global PTZ Camera Sales by Regions (2012-2017) 4.1.2 Global PTZ Camera Revenue by Regions (2012-2017) 4.2 North America PTZ Camera Sales and Growth (2012-2017) 4.3 Europe PTZ Camera Sales and Growth (2012-2017) 4.4 Asia-Pacific PTZ Camera Sales and Growth (2012-2017) 4.5 South America PTZ Camera Sales and Growth (2012-2017) 4.6 Middle East and Africa PTZ Camera Sales and Growth (2012-2017) 5 North America PTZ Camera by Countries 5.1 North America PTZ Camera Sales, Revenue and Market Share by Countries 5.1.1 North America PTZ Camera Sales by Countries (2012-2017) 5.1.2 North America PTZ Camera Revenue by Countries (2012-2017) 5.2 USA PTZ Camera Sales and Growth (2012-2017) 5.3 Canada PTZ Camera Sales and Growth (2012-2017) 5.4 Mexico PTZ Camera Sales and Growth (2012-2017) ..…..Continued Any Query?, Ask Here @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/enquiry/965238-global-ptz-camera-market-by-manufacturers-countries For more information, please visit http://www.wiseguyreports.com


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Green Marine Monitors, a leading manufacturer of sunlight readable marine displays, was chosen to supply monitors for the bridge of Atlantic Pioneer, WorkBoat magazine's 2016 “Boat of the Year”. The first US flagged offshore wind farm crew transfer and service vessel, Atlantic Pioneer features four AWM Series II 19 inch displays, delivering dependable performance at a great value. “Green Marine is a good economic choice compared to other monitors out there,” said Charles A. Donadio Jr., President of Atlantic Wind Transfers and Rhode Island Fast Ferry, who owns and operates the Atlantic Pioneer. “We have always been very pleased with how the monitors work and we haven’t had any problems with them.” “We are always excited to be a part of our client’s success stories,” said Keith Grapes, president of Green Marine Monitors. “It’s always a privilege to work with Charley and Rhode Island Fast Ferry and now we feel honored for him to choose our monitors for the bridge of the Atlantic Pioneer. It feels like we are a part of history.” On the Atlantic Pioneer, Green Marine monitors are “being used for everything, navigational software, weather overlay, camera systems, FLIR night vision, everything we need to see on the screen appears on the monitors,” said Donadio. A positive history of great customer service along with the reliable technology of Green Marine monitors made the choice for bridge displays a simple one for Donadio. “We have had some technical questions regarding the monitors and reached out to Keith. He has responded immediately on any issue that has come up without skipping a beat. Having technical support where you can reach out and connect with someone immediately… and get a response right away is very important in this industry, especially with electronics.” Besides the ruggedness to outlast the elements, these displays incorporate technology that provides users with picture clarity in all lighting conditions. These monitors boast: “We always aim to develop the very best products and continue to enhance them to stay at the forefront of technology. But, it’s a huge complement to our business to be a part of such an innovative vessel,” said Grapes. About Green Marine Monitors: Green Marine is a leading manufacturer of LED marine displays. Combining reliable performance with low power requirements and ease of use, Green Marine products are manufactured to exceed marine industry standards and are available through a network of marine dealers and distributors. For more information on Green Marine Monitors entire product line visit: http://www.greenmarinemonitors.com


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Scheels Overland Park Soccer Complex, one of the country’s top amateur soccer facilities, will replace their old playing surfaces with 12 new Shaw Sports Turf’s Legion Pro system over the next two years. The facility, which opened in 2009, currently has 12 synthetic turf playing surfaces. These fields accommodate 2,000 games per field, per year, with each game lasting approximately 1.5 hours. Games and tournaments at the facility draw over one million visitors per year. Over 20 soccer clubs and organizations use the fields for practice and games and the fields host 18-22 tournaments per year. “The ability to withstand the amount of play we have was an important consideration,” said Mike Laplante, Manager of Soccer Park Operations. “We’ve been speaking with Nate Henderson from Shaw Sports Turf for over two years and they provided us with quality alternatives to consider. “ At the end of an exhaustive search process, Overland Park selected the Legion Pro system, which met the performance characteristics and durability that the complex sought in a new system. The Legion Pro system is a combination of high-performance monofilament fibers and a durable slit film fiber. The slit film fiber is a workhorse that will handle the workload, while the monofilament provides a more resilient surface that enhances performance characteristics. The monofilament fiber is Shaw Sports Turf’s innovative Bolt fiber. Bolt is a stronger, more resilient monofilament fiber, featuring a lightning bolt shape which creates a stronger vertical axis that causes fibers to stand upright for less breakdown and increased durability. Bolt is specifically built for performance and to reflect light for a lower luster and more natural looking field. “Heat was another major consideration for us,” said Laplante. “Fields can get very hot during the summer months when we have a lot of play. We chose Shaw Sports Turf’s HydroChill technology to allow us to face the challenges that come with heat.” When athletes sweat, evaporative cooling takes place when evaporation of moisture from the skin’s surface has a cooling effect. HydroChill works on the same principle. As the turf surface is heated by solar radiation, moisture stored in the turf is released, leaving a cooler, more comfortable surface for athletes. The technology is applied to a field where components react and form a coating on the infill. The field is watered to activate HydroChill and then energy from sunlight drives out water, removing heat from the surface. The cooling effect of HydroChill after watering can last two to three days. Watering alone can result in some short-term cooling, but a flash-effect means temperatures can rise and quickly exceed uncomfortable levels of heat. HydroChill creates a substantial and sustained temperature difference. HydroChill provides maximum benefit when the sun is nearest the Earth. During the summer months the sun is positioned overhead, causing surfaces to absorb more energy, resulting in hotter temperatures. Temperature differences of 50 degrees have been seen on an outdoor field. Studies have shown that temperature differences of over 30 degrees provide a noticeable increase in the comfort level of athletes. The research behind HydroChill was extensive and was conducted for three years, both in laboratory tests and in real-world field applications currently in use by athletes. Shaw Sports Turf’s testing facilities include an entire lab dedicated to the study of heat on turf. It houses a custom-built solar simulator with a watering mechanism that simulates rainfall so testing can be conducted on a year-round basis. Tests on a variety of outdoor surfaces were conducted with thermocouples, an Infrared thermometer and by a certified thermographer with a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) camera. Six of the fields will be installed in 2017, while the remaining six will be installed in 2018. In addition to the Shaw Sports Turf fields, the facility has everything to make a great sports destination. The park has meeting space, a tournament storage area, referee lounges and player locker rooms, a permanent first aid office, three cafes, ample parking, basketball and tennis courts, and multiple playgrounds. Additionally, the immediate area around the park has 35 hotels and 200 restaurants and other local attractions. Over 35 million kids play a sport in the United States. Of that, 21 million are involved in non-school youth sports. The youth sports travel industry, which wasn’t even a measured category that long ago, is now over $7 billion per year. And being a sports destination is a major factor in the facility’s success. In fact, the complex has already hosted several youth soccer national championship tournaments and will host the 2019-2020 US Youth Soccer National Championships. “The Scheels Overland Park Soccer Complex has a proven track record of being a great soccer facility,” said Nate Henderson, Territory Manager for Shaw Sports Turf. “Athletes love playing here and their parents love visiting the area. We are proud that they have selected Shaw Sports Turf to allow them to continue to operate as a premier sports facility and destination.” About Shaw Sports Turf A wholly-owned subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway Inc., Shaw Industries is a full flooring provider to the residential and commercial markets. Shaw supplies carpet, hardwood, laminate, resilient, and tile/ stone flooring products, as well as synthetic turf. Shaw Sports Turf is one of the leading synthetic turf companies in North America and has represented quality and innovation for more than two decades with over 2,000 successful installations, including an impressive list of high-profile field installations. For more information please visit http://www.shawsportsturf.com, call 866-703-4004 or find us on Facebook.

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