Leiden, Netherlands
Leiden, Netherlands

FlexGen is a biotechnology company based in Leiden, Netherlands. FlexGen is a spin-off from Leiden University Medical Centre and Dutch Space and has proprietary technologies for laser based in-situ synthesis of oligonucleotides and other biomolecules. Wikipedia.

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News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.greentechmedia.com

Making microgrids operate more efficiently can rightly be considered a clean technology innovation, even if the technology is largely being put to use in the oil industry. That's what Houston-based FlexGen Power Systems is known for, and what the company recently raised a funding round to do. FlexGen, a startup that makes power conversion devices and the software to stabilize islanded power grid generators, has raised $2.65 million of a $7 million funding round, according to an SEC filing. FlexGen last raised money in 2015, when it landed a $25.5 million Series A investment led by Denver-based Altira Group and the venture capital arms of General Electric and Caterpillar. Back then, CEO Josh Prueher told the Houston Chronicle that the company’s hybrid power system was being used at seven wells for three different operators, with contracts for 60 more rigs for nine large shale gas operators. FlexGen’s Adaptive Control Technology platform comes in a cargo container and installs at off-grid sites, including areas owned by the U.S. military and oil companies. Its power conversion products, including silicon carbide power converters, can operate on their own and with energy storage to provide power quality and stability, controlled through software that monitors island grid AC or DC bus voltage, current and frequency at tenths-of-a-millisecond intervals. Keeping microgrid power stable requires a fine-tuning of generation and loads to manage the lack of inertial stability provided by big power plants. This is particularly important, and a number of companies have built specialized combinations of technologies to handle this challenge. One, ABB’s PowerStore, uses flywheels plus batteries and generators to back up both off-grid industrial operations and large-scale solar farms in Australia. Startups Tendril and People Power have been around since the heyday of home energy management about a decade ago, when companies were garnering tens of millions of dollars in investment from venture capitalists and utilities. As evidenced by our coverage since then, the market has yet to blossom into a hugely profitable business, unless you count Nest thermostats. Even so, Tendril has managed to keep its hand in the game, albeit not without some near-death moments, emerging from utility pilot project limbo into ongoing work with partners such as Duke and American Electric Power, NV Energy, PPL, Alliant Energy and Fortis. And while Tendril's primarily focused on delivering relatively simple home energy reports, it’s also continued to refine its data analytics capabilities, with an eye on turning homes into more predictable, flexible grid resources. The company also raised more than $100 million in investment, most recently with the close of a $5 million round, according to this SEC filing. Tendril previously raised $20 million from SunPower in 2014, and $25 million in 2012 from investors including GE and Siemens. People Power has had less public success with its approach to the smart energy market. The Redwood City, Calif.-based startup launched as a home energy software platform provider, albeit with its own range of smart thermostats and gadgets. It then shifted to seeking home appliance and office equipment partners, such as cable and power strip manufacturer Monster. Now People Power calls itself a comprehensive IOT solution for service providers and manufacturers, via its Presto and Virtuoso platforms. Apparently this iteration of its technology is getting some interest from utilities. Earlier this month, People Power announced an additional $4 million in Series B-1 financing, bringing its total capital raised to date to $14 million. The new financing includes $2 million from innogy SE, the new subsidiary of German energy giant RWE, and $1.2 million from Origin Energy, Australia’s largest energy retailer. Speaking of IOT, startup Riptide IO announced last week that it has raised $1 million in additional financing, closing a $4 million round first launched in 2014. The Santa Barbara, Calif.-based startup was founded in 2012, and last year launched its platform to control lighting, door locks, refrigeration, and heating and cooling in small businesses. The small commercial sector is a tough market for energy management services, requiring technology that’s cheap and simple enough to work in a fast-paced restaurant or retail environment, and scalable enough to cover hundreds or thousands of sites. Riptide claims its system can be installed and operated with little or no training, and is “affordable for even the most modest small-business operating budget.” Competitors in this space include existing HVAC and power controls vendors that are building more intelligence into their devices, demand response providers like EnerNOC, startups such as Powerhouse Dynamics, GridPoint, EnTouch and PlotWatt.


McGinn S.,French Atomic Energy Commission | Bauer D.,University of Oxford | Brefort T.,Comprehensive Biomarker Center GmbH | Dong L.,University of Oxford | And 70 more authors.
New Biotechnology | Year: 2016

The REvolutionary Approaches and Devices for Nucleic Acid analysis (READNA) project received funding from the European Commission for 41/2 years. The objectives of the project revolved around technological developments in nucleic acid analysis. The project partners have discovered, created and developed a huge body of insights into nucleic acid analysis, ranging from improvements and implementation of current technologies to the most promising sequencing technologies that constitute a 3rd and 4th generation of sequencing methods with nanopores and in situ sequencing, respectively. © 2015.


PubMed | Comprehensive Biomarker Center GmbH, PHOTONIS France S.A.S. Avenue Roger Roncier, Chalmers University of Technology, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics and 20 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: New biotechnology | Year: 2016

The REvolutionary Approaches and Devices for Nucleic Acid analysis (READNA) project received funding from the European Commission for 41/2 years. The objectives of the project revolved around technological developments in nucleic acid analysis. The project partners have discovered, created and developed a huge body of insights into nucleic acid analysis, ranging from improvements and implementation of current technologies to the most promising sequencing technologies that constitute a 3(rd) and 4(th) generation of sequencing methods with nanopores and in situ sequencing, respectively.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-1.1-3 | Award Amount: 15.75M | Year: 2008

The REvolutionary Approaches and Devices for Nucleic Acid analysis READNA consortium is composed of researchers from 10 academic institutions, 5 SMEs and 3 large companies. The goals of the READNA consortium are to revolutionize nucleic acid analysis methods, by 1) improving elements necessary to use the currently emerging generation of nucleic acid sequencers in a meaningful and accessible way, 2) providing methods that allow in situ nucleic acid analysis and methods capable of selectively characterizing mutant DNA in a high background of wildtype DNA, 3) combining RNA and DNA analysis in a single analytical device, 4) providing technology to efficiently analyze DNA methylation (genome-wide, with high resolution and in its long-range context), 5) implementing novel concepts for high-throughput HLA-screening, 6) developing fully integrated solutions for mutational screening of small target regions (such as for screening newborns for cystic fibrosis mutations), 7) developing a device for screening multiple target regions with high accuracy, and 8) implementing strategies for effective and high-resolution genotyping of copy number variations. An important part of READNA is dedicated to the development of the next generation of nucleic analysis devices on individual DNA molecules by stretching out nucleic acid molecules in nanosystems, using alpha-hemolysing nanopores and carbon nanotubes. These approaches will benefit from improved interrogation and detection strategies which we will develop. Our methods and devices will boost the possibilities of genetic research by closing in on the target of 1000 Euros for the sequence of a complete human genome, while at the same time leading a revolution in cost-effective, non-invasive early screening for diseases such as cancer.


Franssen-Van Hal N.L.W.,FlexGen | Van Der Putte P.,FlexGen | Hellmuth K.,FlexGen | Matysiak S.,FlexGen | And 2 more authors.
Analytical Chemistry | Year: 2013

Aptamer microarrays are a promising high-throughput method for ultrasensitive detection of multiple analytes, but although much is known about the optimal synthesis of oligonucleotide microarrays used in hybridization-based genomics applications, the bioaffinity interactions between aptamers and their targets is qualitatively different and requires significant changes to synthesis parameters. Focusing on streptavidin-binding DNA aptamers, we employed light-directed in situ synthesis of microarrays to analyze the effects of sequence fidelity, linker length, surface probe density, and substrate functionalization on detection sensitivity. Direct comparison with oligonucleotide hybridization experiments indicates that aptamer microarrays are significantly more sensitive to sequence fidelity and substrate functionalization and have different optimal linker length and surface probe density requirements. Whereas microarray hybridization probes generate maximum signal with multiple deletions, aptamer sequences with the same deletion rate result in a 3-fold binding signal reduction compared with the same sequences synthesized for maximized sequence fidelity. The highest hybridization signal was obtained with dT 5mer linkers, and the highest aptamer signal was obtained with dT 11mers, with shorter aptamer linkers significantly reducing the binding signal. The probe hybridization signal was found to be more sensitive to molecular crowding, whereas the aptamer probe signal does not appear to be constrained within the density of functional surface groups commonly used to synthesize microarrays. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


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