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Bryans Road, MD, United States

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Bryans Road, MD, United States
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News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Dow Chemical is pushing the Trump administration to scrap the findings of federal scientists who point to a family of widely used pesticides as harmful to about 1,800 critically threatened or endangered species. Lawyers representing Dow, whose CEO also heads a White House manufacturing working group, and two other makers of organophosphates sent letters last week to the heads of three Cabinet agencies. The companies asked them "to set aside" the results of government studies the companies contend are fundamentally flawed. The letters, dated April 13, were obtained by The Associated Press. Dow Chemical chairman and CEO Andrew Liveris is a close adviser to President Donald Trump. The company wrote a $1 million check to help underwrite Trump's inaugural festivities. Over the last four years, government scientists have compiled an official record running more than 10,000 pages showing the three pesticides under review — chlorpyrifos, diazinon and malathion — pose a risk to nearly every endangered species they studied. Regulators at the three federal agencies, which share responsibilities for enforcing the Endangered Species Act, are close to issuing findings expected to result in new limits on how and where the highly toxic pesticides can be used. The industry's request comes after EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt announced last month he was reversing an Obama-era effort to bar the use of Dow's chlorpyrifos pesticide on food after recent peer-reviewed studies found that even tiny levels of exposure could hinder the development of children's brains. In his prior job as Oklahoma's attorney general, Pruitt often aligned himself in legal disputes with the interests of executives and corporations who supported his state campaigns. He filed more than one dozen lawsuits seeking to overturn some of the same regulations he is now charged with enforcing. Pruitt declined to answer questions from reporters Wednesday as he toured a polluted Superfund site in Indiana. A spokesman for the agency later told AP that Pruitt won't "prejudge" any potential rule-making decisions as "we are trying to restore regulatory sanity to EPA's work." "We have had no meetings with Dow on this topic and we are reviewing petitions as they come in, giving careful consideration to sound science and good policymaking," said J.P. Freire, EPA's associate administrator for public affairs. "The administrator is committed to listening to stakeholders affected by EPA's regulations, while also reviewing past decisions." The office of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Natural Marine Fisheries Service, did not respond to emailed questions. A spokeswoman for Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, who oversees the Fish and Wildlife Service, referred questions back to EPA. As with the recent human studies of chlorpyrifos, Dow hired its own scientists to produce a lengthy rebuttal to the government studies showing the risks posed to endangered species by organophosphates. The EPA's recent biological evaluation of chlorpyrifos found the pesticide is "likely to adversely affect" 1,778 of the 1,835 animals and plants accessed as part of its study, including critically endangered or threatened species of frogs, fish, birds and mammals. Similar results were shown for malathion and diazinon. In a statement, the Dow subsidiary that sells chlorpyrifos said its lawyers asked for the EPA's biological assessment to be withdrawn because its "scientific basis was not reliable." "Dow AgroSciences is committed to the production and marketing of products that will help American farmers feed the world, and do so with full respect for human health and the environment, including endangered and threatened species," the statement said. "These letters, and the detailed scientific analyses that support them, demonstrate that commitment." FMC Corp., which sells malathion, said the withdrawal of the EPA studies will allow the necessary time for the "best available" scientific data to be compiled. "Malathion is a critical tool in protecting agriculture from damaging pests," the company said. Diazinon maker Makhteshim Agan of North America Inc., which does business under the name Adama, did not respond to emails seeking comment. Environmental advocates were not surprised the companies might seek to forestall new regulations that might hurt their profits, but said Wednesday that criticism of the government's scientists was unfounded. The methods used to conduct EPA's biological evaluations were developed by the National Academy of Sciences. Brett Hartl, government affairs director for the Center for Biological Diversity, said Dow's experts were trying to hold EPA scientists to an unrealistic standard of data collection that could only be achieved under "perfect laboratory conditions." "You can't just take an endangered fish out of the wild, take it to the lab and then expose it to enough pesticides until it dies to get that sort of data," Hartl said. "It's wrong morally, and it's illegal." Originally derived from a nerve gas developed by Nazi Germany, chlorpyrifos has been sprayed on citrus fruits, apples, cherries and other crops for decades. It is among the most widely used agricultural pesticides in the United States, with Dow selling about 5 million pounds domestically each year. As a result, traces of the chemical are commonly found in sources of drinking water. A 2012 study at the University of California at Berkeley found that 87 percent of umbilical-cord blood samples tested from newborn babies contained detectable levels of chlorpyrifos. In 2005, the Bush administration ordered an end to residential use of diazinon to kill yard pests such as ants and grub worms after determining that it poses a human health risk, particularly to children. However it is still approved for use by farmers, who spray it on fruits and vegetables. Malathion is widely sprayed to control mosquitoes and fruit flies. It is also an active ingredient in some shampoos prescribed to children for treating lice. A coalition of environmental groups has fought in court for years to spur EPA to more closely examine the risk posed to humans and endangered species by pesticides, especially organophosphates. "Endangered species are the canary in the coal mine," Hartl said. Since many of the threatened species are aquatic, he said they are often the first to show the effects of long-term chemical contamination in rivers and lakes used as sources of drinking water by humans. Dow, which spent more than $13.6 million on lobbying in 2016, has long wielded substantial political power in the nation's capital. There is no indication the chemical giant's influence has waned. When Trump signed an executive order in February mandating the creation of task forces at federal agencies to roll back government regulations, Dow's chief executive was at Trump's side. "Andrew, I would like to thank you for initially getting the group together and for the fantastic job you've done," Trump said as he signed the order during an Oval Office ceremony. The president then handed his pen to Liveris to keep as a souvenir. Rachelle Schikorra, the director of public affairs for Dow Chemical, said any suggestion that the company's $1 million donation to Trump's inaugural committee was intended to help influence regulatory decisions made by the new administration is "completely off the mark." "Dow actively participates in policymaking and political processes, including political contributions to candidates, parties and causes, in compliance with all applicable federal and state laws," Schikorra said. "Dow maintains and is committed to the highest standard of ethical conduct in all such activity."


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Dow Chemical is pushing a Trump administration open to scrapping regulations to ignore the findings of federal scientists who point to a family of widely used pesticides as harmful to about 1,800 critically threatened or endangered species. Lawyers representing Dow, whose CEO is a close adviser to Trump, and two other manufacturers of organophosphates sent letters last week to the heads of three of Trump's Cabinet agencies. The companies asked them "to set aside" the results of government studies the companies contend are fundamentally flawed. Dow Chemical wrote a $1 million check to help underwrite Trump's inaugural festivities, and its chairman and CEO, Andrew Liveris, heads a White House manufacturing working group. The industry's request comes after EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt announced last month he was reversing an Obama-era effort to bar the use of Dow's chlorpyrifos pesticide on food after recent peer-reviewed studies found that even tiny levels of exposure could hinder the development of children's brains. In his prior job as Oklahoma's attorney general, Pruitt often aligned himself in legal disputes with the interests of executives and corporations who supported his state campaigns. He filed more than a dozen lawsuits seeking to overturn some of the same regulations he is now charged with enforcing. Pruitt declined to answer questions from reporters Wednesday as he toured a polluted Superfund site in Indiana. A spokesman for the agency later told AP that Pruitt won't "prejudge" any potential rule-making decisions as "we are trying to restore regulatory sanity to EPA's work." The letters to Cabinet heads, dated April 13, were obtained by The Associated Press. As with the recent human studies of chlorpyrifos, Dow hired its own scientists to produce a lengthy rebuttal to the government studies. Over the past four years, government scientists have compiled an official record running more than 10,000 pages indicating the three pesticides under review - chlorpyrifos, diazinon and malathion - pose a risk to nearly every endangered species they studied. Regulators at the three federal agencies, which share responsibilities for enforcing the Endangered Species Act, are close to issuing findings expected to result in new limits on how and where the highly toxic pesticides can be used. "We have had no meetings with Dow on this topic and we are reviewing petitions as they come in, giving careful consideration to sound science and good policymaking," said J.P. Freire, EPA's associate administrator for public affairs. "The administrator is committed to listening to stakeholders affected by EPA's regulations, while also reviewing past decisions." The office of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Natural Marine Fisheries Service, did not respond to emailed questions. A spokeswoman for Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, who oversees the Fish and Wildlife Service, referred questions back to EPA. The EPA's recent biological evaluation of chlorpyrifos found the pesticide is "likely to adversely affect" 1,778 of the 1,835 animals and plants accessed as part of its study, including critically endangered or threatened species of frogs, fish, birds and mammals. Similar results were shown for malathion and diazinon. In a statement, the Dow subsidiary that sells chlorpyrifos said its lawyers asked for the EPA's biological assessment to be withdrawn because its "scientific basis was not reliable." "Dow AgroSciences is committed to the production and marketing of products that will help American farmers feed the world, and do so with full respect for human health and the environment, including endangered and threatened species," the statement said. "These letters, and the detailed scientific analyses that support them, demonstrate that commitment." FMC Corp., which sells malathion, said the withdrawal of the EPA studies would allow the necessary time for the "best available" scientific data to be compiled. "Malathion is a critical tool in protecting agriculture from damaging pests," the company said. Diazinon maker Makhteshim Agan of North America Inc., which does business under the name Adama, did not respond to emails seeking comment. Environmental advocates said Wednesday that criticism of the government's scientists was unfounded. The methods used to conduct EPA's biological evaluations were developed by the National Academy of Sciences. Brett Hartl, government affairs director for the Center for Biological Diversity, said Dow's experts were trying to hold EPA scientists to an unrealistic standard of data collection that could only be achieved under "perfect laboratory conditions." "You can't just take an endangered fish out of the wild, take it to the lab and then expose it to enough pesticides until it dies to get that sort of data," Hartl said. "It's wrong morally, and it's illegal." Organophosphorus gas was originally developed as a chemical weapon by Nazi Germany. Dow has been selling Chlorpyrifos for spraying on citrus fruits, apples, cherries and other crops since the 1960s. It is among the most widely used agricultural pesticides in the United States, with Dow selling about 5 million pounds domestically each year. As a result, traces of the chemical are commonly found in sources of drinking water. A 2012 study at the University of California at Berkeley found that 87 percent of umbilical-cord blood samples tested from newborn babies contained detectable levels of chlorpyrifos. In 2005, the Bush administration ordered an end to residential use of diazinon to kill yard pests such as ants and grub worms after determining that it poses a human health risk, particularly to children. However it is still approved for use by farmers, who spray it on fruits and vegetables. Malathion is widely sprayed to control mosquitoes and fruit flies. It is also an active ingredient in some shampoos prescribed to children for treating lice. A coalition of environmental groups has fought in court for years to spur EPA to more closely examine the risk posed to humans and endangered species by pesticides, especially organophosphates. "Endangered species are the canary in the coal mine," Hartl said. Since many of the threatened species are aquatic, he said they are often the first to show the effects of long-term chemical contamination in rivers and lakes used as sources of drinking water by humans. Dow, which spent more than $13.6 million on lobbying in 2016, has long wielded substantial political power in the nation's capital. There is no indication the chemical giant's influence has waned. When Trump signed an executive order in February mandating the creation of task forces at federal agencies to roll back government regulations, Dow's chief executive was at Trump's side. "Andrew, I would like to thank you for initially getting the group together and for the fantastic job you've done," Trump said as he signed the order during an Oval Office ceremony. The president then handed his pen to Liveris to keep as a souvenir. Rachelle Schikorra, the director of public affairs for Dow Chemical, said any suggestion that the company's $1 million donation to Trump's inaugural committee was intended to help influence regulatory decisions is "completely off the mark." "Dow actively participates in policymaking and political processes, including political contributions to candidates, parties and causes, in compliance with all applicable federal and state laws," Schikorra said. "Dow maintains and is committed to the highest standard of ethical conduct in all such activity."


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

The US Marine Mammal Commission, an organisation charged with restoring mammal populations in the world’s oceans, is set for the chop in president Donald Trump’s latest budget proposal. The budget, released on 23 May, includes a 16 per cent cut to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s bodies and agencies. This would close down the MMC, an independent federal agency, which costs around US$3.41 million a year, or around one penny per American. The Maryland-based commission sees itself as a “one-stop shop” for marine mammal science and policies, says its chairman Daryl Boness. The commission reviews human activities in the ocean -including shipping, military drills and fossil fuel extraction – and uses the latest science to ascertain the impact of such activities on marine mammals. “The commission’s role as an oversight agency on all issues related to marine mammals is unique; no one else in the world meets this mandate,” Boness told the New Scientist. “This service to the public, marine mammals and their ecosystem would end.” The MMC was established in 1972. Its own small-scale science projects cover topics such developing fishing nets that catch fewer mammals, and Whale Alert app to help sailors avoid whales and to alert authorities to injured or distressed whales. The commission looks after the stocks of many threatened American sea mammals, including such iconic species as the Hawaiian monk seal, Florida manatees, beluga whales, orcas and polar bears. For example, in April it hosted a summit with researchers, industry representatives and politicians to reduce the entanglement of North Atlantic right whales in fishing gear. News of the commission’s possible demise has caused uproar among conservationists around the world. Ingrid Biedron, a marine scientist at international ocean protection group Oceana, says no other organisation can fill the MMC’s footsteps. “By law, the commission has access to all federal studies and data related to marine mammals, and by law, other federal agencies are required to consider and respond to the commission’s recommendations,” Biedron explains. “This is not the case for academic experts on marine mammals.” Other marine agencies are also at risk under the 2018 budget proposal. The National Marine Fisheries Service would lose $22m off its Fisheries Research and Management Program, while its protected species programme would lose $7m and, according to Oceana, become effectively unable to carry out its responsibilities. Boness says the cuts are a blow to America’s “strong environmental ethic”. He worries that, without the MMC, marine exploitation will continue “without the necessary checks and balances that help to ensure that those activities are done in the most environmentally conscientious way possible”.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Woods Hole, Massachusetts , May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, released on Wednesday, May 24 a solicitation for grounds keeping/landscaping services. The contractor who received the opportunity must provide all plants, labor, materials, equipment, and supervision necessary to perform moving and trimming operations; edging; shrubs and hedge maintenance; debris removal and grounds cleanup; weed control; pesticide application; bed maintenance; and spring and fall cleanup. NEFSC anticipates awarding a one-year firm fixed-price contract, with four option years, and also intends to award the contract to a certified small business. The applicable NAICS code is 561730 with a size standard of $7.5 million. Interested and capable contractors must respond to the solicitation by no later than 12 p.m. EST on June 12, and NEFSC anticipates awarding the contract by no later than June 14, 2017. Interested and capable contractors can send responses to Susan Faux at susan.faux@noaa.gov. The contractor who receives this contract also must be registered with the System for Award Management (SAM) database and have as part of the Registration all current Representations and Certifications. US Federal Contractor Registration, the world’s largest third-party government registration firm, completes the required Registrations on behalf of its clients. It also makes available information about opportunities like this, as well as training on how to locate, research, and respond to opportunities. We also make available for our clients and for contracting officers our proprietary Advanced Federal Procurement Data Search (AFPDS). Our Advanced Federal Procurement Data Search (AFPDS) gives you in one place instant bid notifications, bid proposal prospecting, and information about government procurement officers. We make this search tool available to clients, as part of our commitment to helping each and every USFCR client succeed and thrive as a government contractor. For contracting officers, the AFPDS gives them in one place access to a database of available contractors and also a place to post information about opportunities. Contracting officers get free access to AFPDS. We also provide interested contracting officers a list of contractors who may be able to provide a service and/or product that they need.                                                                                                                         For more information, to get started with a SAM registration, to learn more about how US Federal Contractor Registration can help your business succeed, to find out how we can help you complete the processes necessary to become certified as one or more types of small business(es), and/or to speak with our federal training specialists about how to craft a memorable proposal, call 877-252-2700, ext. 1.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Woods Hole, Massachusetts , May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, released on Wednesday, May 24 a solicitation for grounds keeping/landscaping services. The contractor who received the opportunity must provide all plants, labor, materials, equipment, and supervision necessary to perform moving and trimming operations; edging; shrubs and hedge maintenance; debris removal and grounds cleanup; weed control; pesticide application; bed maintenance; and spring and fall cleanup. NEFSC anticipates awarding a one-year firm fixed-price contract, with four option years, and also intends to award the contract to a certified small business. The applicable NAICS code is 561730 with a size standard of $7.5 million. Interested and capable contractors must respond to the solicitation by no later than 12 p.m. EST on June 12, and NEFSC anticipates awarding the contract by no later than June 14, 2017. Interested and capable contractors can send responses to Susan Faux at susan.faux@noaa.gov. The contractor who receives this contract also must be registered with the System for Award Management (SAM) database and have as part of the Registration all current Representations and Certifications. US Federal Contractor Registration, the world’s largest third-party government registration firm, completes the required Registrations on behalf of its clients. It also makes available information about opportunities like this, as well as training on how to locate, research, and respond to opportunities. We also make available for our clients and for contracting officers our proprietary Advanced Federal Procurement Data Search (AFPDS). Our Advanced Federal Procurement Data Search (AFPDS) gives you in one place instant bid notifications, bid proposal prospecting, and information about government procurement officers. We make this search tool available to clients, as part of our commitment to helping each and every USFCR client succeed and thrive as a government contractor. For contracting officers, the AFPDS gives them in one place access to a database of available contractors and also a place to post information about opportunities. Contracting officers get free access to AFPDS. We also provide interested contracting officers a list of contractors who may be able to provide a service and/or product that they need.                                                                                                                         For more information, to get started with a SAM registration, to learn more about how US Federal Contractor Registration can help your business succeed, to find out how we can help you complete the processes necessary to become certified as one or more types of small business(es), and/or to speak with our federal training specialists about how to craft a memorable proposal, call 877-252-2700, ext. 1.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Woods Hole, Massachusetts , May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, released on Wednesday, May 24 a solicitation for grounds keeping/landscaping services. The contractor who received the opportunity must provide all plants, labor, materials, equipment, and supervision necessary to perform moving and trimming operations; edging; shrubs and hedge maintenance; debris removal and grounds cleanup; weed control; pesticide application; bed maintenance; and spring and fall cleanup. NEFSC anticipates awarding a one-year firm fixed-price contract, with four option years, and also intends to award the contract to a certified small business. The applicable NAICS code is 561730 with a size standard of $7.5 million. Interested and capable contractors must respond to the solicitation by no later than 12 p.m. EST on June 12, and NEFSC anticipates awarding the contract by no later than June 14, 2017. Interested and capable contractors can send responses to Susan Faux at susan.faux@noaa.gov. The contractor who receives this contract also must be registered with the System for Award Management (SAM) database and have as part of the Registration all current Representations and Certifications. US Federal Contractor Registration, the world’s largest third-party government registration firm, completes the required Registrations on behalf of its clients. It also makes available information about opportunities like this, as well as training on how to locate, research, and respond to opportunities. We also make available for our clients and for contracting officers our proprietary Advanced Federal Procurement Data Search (AFPDS). Our Advanced Federal Procurement Data Search (AFPDS) gives you in one place instant bid notifications, bid proposal prospecting, and information about government procurement officers. We make this search tool available to clients, as part of our commitment to helping each and every USFCR client succeed and thrive as a government contractor. For contracting officers, the AFPDS gives them in one place access to a database of available contractors and also a place to post information about opportunities. Contracting officers get free access to AFPDS. We also provide interested contracting officers a list of contractors who may be able to provide a service and/or product that they need.                                                                                                                         For more information, to get started with a SAM registration, to learn more about how US Federal Contractor Registration can help your business succeed, to find out how we can help you complete the processes necessary to become certified as one or more types of small business(es), and/or to speak with our federal training specialists about how to craft a memorable proposal, call 877-252-2700, ext. 1.


News Article | May 27, 2017
Site: www.thefishsite.com

The 2018 budget unveiled on May 23 by the Trump administration is bad news for anything that swims in or near US waters. At a glance the Trump budget will cut $1.5 billion from the US Commerce Department, with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) taking the hardest hit. The NOAA budget for its National Marine Fisheries Service operations, research and facilities would be slashed by about $43 million. It would eliminate NOAA’s coastal research programs and the Sea Grant program. The Trump dump also includes pulling the budget from NOAA’s Coastal Zone Management Program and the Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund, which targets recovery of West Coast and Alaska salmon runs. Funding for management and enforcement of US catch share programs, such as halibut, sablefish and Bering Sea crab, would be cut by $5 million. The budgets for Coastal Ecosystem Resiliency Grants, Interjurisdictional Fisheries Grants, the Chesapeake Bay project, the Great Lakes Restoration Project and the National Estuary Program also would be eliminated. Another $193 billion would be cut over 10 years from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) that is used by over 42 million needy Americans to supplement food purchases and often includes government-purchased seafood. Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, told McClatchy News that the Trump administration “looked at the budget process through the eyes of the people who were actually paying the bills.” A freezer van is portside again at Dillingham, this time filled with frozen Alaska pollock patties. It’s the third fish van to tie up at Dillingham in the past year from SeaShare, a nonprofit that brings seafood destined for needy families throughout the region. “We’ve distributed about 200,000 pounds of seafood to needy Alaskans over the past year, but it’s very hard to reach some of the western Alaska communities because of transportation coordination and it gets really expensive,” said Jim Harmon, director of the nonprofit group. “Last year we purchased a freezer container and filled it with frozen seafood in Seattle and shipped it north on an AML barge to Dillingham and installed it at the port there.” SeaShare is the only non-profit in the US dedicated to bringing seafood to food banks. Since 1994 when it began as a “bycatch to food banks” effort, the group has donated over 210 million servings of seafood and provided the logistical framework to get it to needy Americans across the nation. At remote places like Dillingham, Harmon said a true partnership helps pull it off. “The Bristol Bay Economic Development Corporation was the champion that helped pull this together,” Harmon said. “They issued a grant to pay for the labor that the Bristol Bay Native Association needed to coordinate the downstream distribution for us. Peter Pan came through with a van load of sockeye and Chinook salmon and Ocean Beauty has made donations. It’s community helping community.” “SeaShare’s seafood will feed many low-income families. Currently, we are feeding roughly 272 households in 15 communities in the Bristol Bay region,” said Barbara Nunn, Food Bank Manager at BBNA. The first two Dillingham shipments included salmon; the van tied up now holds 7,000 pounds of lightly breaded, four-ounce portions of frozen Alaska pollock. “Pollock is the biggest fish in the world that nobody knows about. It’s not something we normally send to Alaska,” Harmon explained, “but the At-Sea Processors Association donates 250,000 pounds of whitefish blocks every year and Trident converted them into breaded portions.” Bethel is the next Western Alaska seafood hub that SeaShare is eyeing for hunger relief. “A lot of these coastal communities have fisheries, and they ship all the fish out. Then they import expensive food that, if it’s frozen, has to be air freighted out there which is very expensive,” Harmon said. “If we can help with a distribution framework by putting a freezer there and use surface freight rather than air, we can ship larger quantities and let them distribute it to outlying communities.” Reintroducing mild-tasting, nutrient-packed herring to American menus is the goal of Seattle restaurateurs during next month’s Northwest Herring Week. The event, which began with just eight chefs three summers ago, has nearly doubled last year’s participation. “I think we’re going to cut it off at 60,” said Bruce Schactler, food aid director for the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute, an event sponsor. “I believe there are eight different James Beard Award winners taking part with their restaurants. So it’s turning out to be quite the high profile thing. That’s good when you’re trying to recreate a market,” he added. Herring Week also has spread beyond Seattle to restaurants in outlying regions this year. “We’ve been able to add more people over on the Bellevue side and as far north as Woodinville,” Schactler said. Five thousand pounds of herring fillets are being donated to the restaurants by North Pacific Seafoods from the recent fishery at Togiak. Alaska’s total herring catches top 30,000 tons each year and are valued primarily for the roe from the female fish, The herring also is used as bait, but much of it, especially the males, is turned into fish meal. Globally, herring catches can top four million tons and the fish is a meal staple in other countries. A McDowell study showed that Norwegian fishermen can fetch over $1.40 a pound for herring. Last year in Alaska the average price of bait fish to fishermen was 18 cents a pound and just one penny a pound for roe herring. Herring Week gives diners the opportunity to experience herring in a wide array of high end dishes. “Everything from fritters to pickled and cured to grilled and everything in between,” Schactler said, adding that the annual event could soon expand on the west coast and to Chicago and beyond. Northwest Herring Week runs from June 19 to the 25th. Learn more and see a lineup of herring dishes at www.nwherringweek.com This material is protected by copyright. For information on reprinting, contact msfish@alaskan.com


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Woods Hole, Massachusetts , May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, released on Wednesday, May 24 a solicitation for grounds keeping/landscaping services. The contractor who received the opportunity must provide all plants, labor, materials, equipment, and supervision necessary to perform moving and trimming operations; edging; shrubs and hedge maintenance; debris removal and grounds cleanup; weed control; pesticide application; bed maintenance; and spring and fall cleanup. NEFSC anticipates awarding a one-year firm fixed-price contract, with four option years, and also intends to award the contract to a certified small business. The applicable NAICS code is 561730 with a size standard of $7.5 million. Interested and capable contractors must respond to the solicitation by no later than 12 p.m. EST on June 12, and NEFSC anticipates awarding the contract by no later than June 14, 2017. Interested and capable contractors can send responses to Susan Faux at susan.faux@noaa.gov. The contractor who receives this contract also must be registered with the System for Award Management (SAM) database and have as part of the Registration all current Representations and Certifications. US Federal Contractor Registration, the world’s largest third-party government registration firm, completes the required Registrations on behalf of its clients. It also makes available information about opportunities like this, as well as training on how to locate, research, and respond to opportunities. We also make available for our clients and for contracting officers our proprietary Advanced Federal Procurement Data Search (AFPDS). Our Advanced Federal Procurement Data Search (AFPDS) gives you in one place instant bid notifications, bid proposal prospecting, and information about government procurement officers. We make this search tool available to clients, as part of our commitment to helping each and every USFCR client succeed and thrive as a government contractor. For contracting officers, the AFPDS gives them in one place access to a database of available contractors and also a place to post information about opportunities. Contracting officers get free access to AFPDS. We also provide interested contracting officers a list of contractors who may be able to provide a service and/or product that they need.                                                                                                                         For more information, to get started with a SAM registration, to learn more about how US Federal Contractor Registration can help your business succeed, to find out how we can help you complete the processes necessary to become certified as one or more types of small business(es), and/or to speak with our federal training specialists about how to craft a memorable proposal, call 877-252-2700, ext. 1.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Woods Hole, Massachusetts , May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, released on Wednesday, May 24 a solicitation for grounds keeping/landscaping services. The contractor who received the opportunity must provide all plants, labor, materials, equipment, and supervision necessary to perform moving and trimming operations; edging; shrubs and hedge maintenance; debris removal and grounds cleanup; weed control; pesticide application; bed maintenance; and spring and fall cleanup. NEFSC anticipates awarding a one-year firm fixed-price contract, with four option years, and also intends to award the contract to a certified small business. The applicable NAICS code is 561730 with a size standard of $7.5 million. Interested and capable contractors must respond to the solicitation by no later than 12 p.m. EST on June 12, and NEFSC anticipates awarding the contract by no later than June 14, 2017. Interested and capable contractors can send responses to Susan Faux at susan.faux@noaa.gov. The contractor who receives this contract also must be registered with the System for Award Management (SAM) database and have as part of the Registration all current Representations and Certifications. US Federal Contractor Registration, the world’s largest third-party government registration firm, completes the required Registrations on behalf of its clients. It also makes available information about opportunities like this, as well as training on how to locate, research, and respond to opportunities. We also make available for our clients and for contracting officers our proprietary Advanced Federal Procurement Data Search (AFPDS). Our Advanced Federal Procurement Data Search (AFPDS) gives you in one place instant bid notifications, bid proposal prospecting, and information about government procurement officers. We make this search tool available to clients, as part of our commitment to helping each and every USFCR client succeed and thrive as a government contractor. For contracting officers, the AFPDS gives them in one place access to a database of available contractors and also a place to post information about opportunities. Contracting officers get free access to AFPDS. We also provide interested contracting officers a list of contractors who may be able to provide a service and/or product that they need.                                                                                                                         For more information, to get started with a SAM registration, to learn more about how US Federal Contractor Registration can help your business succeed, to find out how we can help you complete the processes necessary to become certified as one or more types of small business(es), and/or to speak with our federal training specialists about how to craft a memorable proposal, call 877-252-2700, ext. 1.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.undercurrentnews.com

Chris Oliver, the executive director of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council (NPFMC), appears to have the inside track to become the Assistant Administrator for Fisheries, the head of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Oliver has had widespread support from a range of seafood industry groups around the country, based on his long history as a successful leader of the NPFMC. The latest talk within the industry is that Oliver is indeed the pick that the Commerce Department has submitted to the White House. The recommendation still has to get White House approval, and also a congressional approval of the nomination is needed. But all indications are that Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross is picking Oliver. Oliver has had strong support from Northwest and Alaska congressional delegation and industry and also has a lot of support in the Gulf region. The Gulf Seafood Institute, the Louisiana Restaurant Association, and the Charter Fisherman's Association all have written letters of support.

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