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Yang G.-J.,Dalian Ocean University | Song L.,Liaoning Ocean and Fisheries Science Research Institute | Wang N.-B.,Liaoning Ocean and Fisheries Science Research Institute | Liu Q.-M.,Hainan Provincial Fisheries Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Chinese Journal of Ecology | Year: 2013

A laboratory simulation experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of suspended solid on the survival, growth, and physiology of Mactra veneriformis. The M. veneriformis individuals were exposed to different concentrations of suspended solid (0 mg·L-1 group A), 100 mg·L-1(group B), 1000 mg·L-1(group C), and 10000 mg·L-1(group D), and the changes of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in the visceral mass and gill filament of M. veneriformis were investigated. Under the stress of suspended solid, M. veneriformis appeared chronic toxic effect, with the survival and growth being inhibited to some extent. The gill SOD activity of the M. veneriformis exposed to 100 and 1000 mg·L-1 of suspended solid produced an adaptive induced response, but that of the M. veneriformis exposed to 10000 mg·L-1 of suspended solid was significantly inhibited first and induced then, as compared to the control group. The visceral SOD activity had less change with time and suspended solid concentration (P>0.05). The gill CAT activity of the M. veneriformis exposed to 1000 and 10000 mg·L-1 of suspended solid was up-regulated first, returned to normal then, and increased again, while that of the M. veneriformis exposed to 100 mg·L-1 of suspended solid was only up-regulated significantly during the later period of the experiment. The visceral CAT activity had less change with time and suspended solid concentration. These findings showed that the visceral mass antioxidant system was not activated under suspended solid stress, but the gill filament antioxidant enzyme activity responded quickly to the stress, suggesting that the gill filament antioxidant system was more sensitive to suspended solid.


Yanyu S.,CAS Changchun Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology | Yanyu S.,Chinese Academy of Sciences | Changchun S.,CAS Changchun Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology | Songbai J.,Fisheries Science Research Institute of Jilin Province | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Phytoremediation | Year: 2010

Phragmites australis was grown hydroponically in nutrient solutions containing nitrobenzene to examine the potential for treatment of contaminated waters through phytoremediation. The hydroponic solutions and plant tissue were sampled each day during the five day growth period and tested for nitrobenzene. Plant tissue analysis included both rhizome and shoot sections of the plant. The average half lives and disappearance rate of nitrobenzene in the nutrient solution was 1.85 days and 88.10%, respectively. The levels of nitrobenzene in rhizomes and shoots of Phragmites australis increased with higher exogenous concentrations. For the highest treatment, nitrobenzene measurements in the rhizome tissue were much higher than the plant shoots until the third day. Shoot sections initially showed elevated concentrations and then decreased. This variation is presumably due to the translocation of the target compound from the rhizomes to shoots. Our findings indicate that Phragmites australis removed nitrobenzene from the hydroponic solutions and accumulated the compound within the plant tissue. This activity makes Phragmites australis a good candidate species for the phytoremediation of nitrobenzene contaminated waters. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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