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Ashraf M.,University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences | Javaid M.,Fish Seed Hatchery Satyana Road Faisalabad | Rashid T.,Fisheries Research and Training Institute Manawan | Ayub M.,Sanda Road | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Agriculture and Biology | Year: 2011

Chlorella sp., was isolated from wild water and purified on agar plates. Chlorella culture was further extended in Erlenmeyer's flasks on pure nutrient media (reagent grade chemicals) and then maximized in aspirators. Chlorella was then cultured on mass scale in polyethylene bags and 1000 L fiber glass tanks on commercial fertilizers (urea, nutri-calcium, ammonium sulfate, phosphorus plus (P+), potash-plus (K+), nitro-20 and di-ammonium phosphate (DAP) instead of pure nutrient media as practiced in flasks and aspirators. Various combinations of N, P and K were prepared empirically from aforementioned fertilizers and added to polythene bags and fiber glass tanks in fixed ratios for propagation of Chlorella vulgaris. Combined applications of urea, P+ and K+ (N:P:K; 16:4:6) produced the highest cell number (34.05×106 cells mL-1) and were far higher (p<0.05) than control group (8.5×106 cells mL-1). Duration of the log phase of Chlorella varied among containers. The polythene bags showed the best average (200%) and median (178%) growth rates of natural increase at exponential phase. Growth rate per day (244%), density (34.05×106 cell) and division's day-1 (2.9) were also highest in polythene bags. Fiberglass tanks were second in production and average algal growth, median growth, maximum growth rate day-1, maximum cell density, divisions day-1, generation time day-1 h-1 were 1.13 (113%), 1.19 (119%), 1.19 (119%), 23.15×106 cells mL-1H, 1.63, 0.57 and 14.7, respectively. Chlorella in aspirators exhibited the poorest growth. The average and median growth rates were 34.95% and 39.93%, respectively. Growth rate day-1 was 57.64%, and maximum cell density did not exceed 8.5×106 cells mL-1 and divisions day-1 were only 0.504. Strong positive correlation was observed between number of cells and number of days. It was the highest in polythene bags (R2=0.9724) and the lowest in aspirators (R2=0.7539), while correlation values for fiberglass tanks fell in between these two extremes (R2=0.8355). Ciliates, major algae consumers were successfully controlled by the application of quinine sulfate @ 80 mg L-1 of water after 3 h of administration with no effect on algal cells. © 2011 Friends Science Publishers.


Chatta A.M.,Fisheries Research and Training Institute Manawan | Khan A.M.,University of Punjab | Khan M.N.,University of Punjab | Ayub M.,Government of Punjab
Journal of Animal and Plant Sciences | Year: 2015

Studies were conducted to explore the survival and growth potential of Tor macrolepis in existing polyculture system when cultured with Indian major carps viz, Labeo rohita (Rohu), Catla catla (Thaila) and Cirrhinus mrigala (Mrigal). There were two treatments and a Control, with three replicates each. Fish stocking density in all the treatments was kept 2000 fish/ha. Control contained only Tor macrolepis (100%); Treatment-1 (T 1) stocked with Labeo rohita 60%, mrigal 25% and Catla catla15%; while Treatment- 2 (T 2) with Tor macrolepis 20%, Labeo rohita 50%, Cirrhinus mrigala 20% and Catla catla10%. Fish was fed daily, @5% of its body weight and studies were continued for 120 days. Among treatments, Tor macrolepis gained slightly higher weight in T 2 than Control; Labeo rohita gained significantly higher in T 1 than T 2; Cirrhinus mrigala gained slightly higher weight in T 2 than T 1 and Catla catla gained similar weight in both, T 1 and T 2. Overall Catla catla gained maximum weight while Tor macrolepis gained minimum. The survival rate and feed conversion ratio (FCR) of Tor macrolepis was significantly higher in T 2 than Control. It is observed that Tor macrolepis has some food overlapping with Labeo rohita. © 2015, Pakistan Agricultural Scientists Forum. All rights reserved.


Ashraf M.,University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences | Ullah S.,Fish Seed Hatchery Mianchannun | Rashid T.,Fisheries Research and Training Institute Manawan | Ayub M.,2 Sanda Road | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Agriculture and Biology | Year: 2010

Recently rotifer culture projects were undertaken at selected places in Punjab province. Rotifers are fed on Chlorella vulgaris ad libitum and exact algal requirements are not cared for which increases the production cost of rotifers. Therefore in the current studies, algal cell requirement of Brachionus calyciflorus was determined for its cost effective production and utilization of data acquired in similar studies or in commercial applications. Required number of rotifers were withdrawn from the main stock, divided into three groups and fed on known number of laboratory grown C. vulgaris. Left over cells were counted after 24 h in all the three groups and their ingestion and filtration rates were determined. Algal cell requirements of B. calyciflorus were therefore determined which came out 32977 to 35540 cells/rotifer/day. In the second trial rotifers were cultured in cow-dung media with or without supplemental aeration. Jars aerated for 24 h produced highest rotifer density (350/mL), while those with 12 h aeration ranked second and those without aeration even could not support hatching of cysts. In the third trial effect of type and size of container on rotifer production was determined. Significantly higher rotifer density was observed in jars (380 rotifers/mL) compared with flasks (174/mL). The fourth trial was meant to determine the effect of culture duration on rotifer density. Highest number (135 rotifers/mL) was observed after 15 days of inoculation, the rotifers then started to decline and were 115/mL after 26 days of inoculation. © 2010 Friends Science Publishers.


Chatta A.M.,Fisheries Research and Training Institute Manawan | Chatta A.M.,University of Punjab | Khan M.N.,University of Punjab | Mirza Z.S.,Fisheries Research and Training Institute Manawan | Ali A.,Fisheries Research and Training Institute Manawan
Turkish Journal of Zoology | Year: 2016

To assess heavy metal loads in cultured fish, four farmed carp fish species were sampled from a fish farming cluster at the Head Qadirabad area. Samples were randomly collected from fish farms and a local fish market and analyzed for three nonessential heavy metals, cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), and lead (Pb), at Fish Quality Control Labs Manawan, Lahore, Pakistan. All three tested metals were found in all samples of selected fish species. The highest accumulation among heavy metals in farmed carps was recorded for Pb (0.3316 ± 0.0143 μg g–1), followed by Cr (0.0488 ± 0.0063 μg g–1) and Cd (0.0094 ± 0.0011 μg g–1). Mean Pb concentrations found in Labeo rohita (0.3316 ± 0.0143 μg g–1) and Hypophthalmichthys molitrix (0.3246 ± 0.0496 μg g–1), collected from the local market, were beyond the permissible limits of the WHO for fish (0.123 μg g–1), while the concentrations of Cr (0.0488 ± 0.0063 μg g–1) and Cd (0.0094±0.0011 μg g–1) were found to be below the WHO permissible limits (0.100 μg g–1). Cd was significantly higher in Labeo rohita when compared with other species, while among distribution points Cr was significantly higher in fishes sampled from the local fish market. The correlation matrix showed that concentrations of Cd and Pb were significantly and positively correlated with each other. This study concludes that farmed fish produced in the Head Qadirabad area along the Chenab River are not safe for human consumption due to the presence of Pb, beyond acceptable limits. Eating farmed fish from this area may pose health hazards for humans and thus can create an upsetting situation, not only for the consumers but for the producers as well. © TÜBİTAK.


Chatta A.M.,Fisheries Research and Training Institute Manawan | Ahmad Z.,Fisheries Research and Training Institute Manawan | Hayat S.,Fisheries Research and Training Institute Manawan | Naqvi S.A.,Fisheries Research and Training Institute Manawan | Khan A.M.,University of Punjab
Journal of Animal and Plant Sciences | Year: 2015

To observethe survival and growth of golden mahseer (Tor macrolepis)and its impact on other traditionally cultured carps in pond polyculture, a study was conducted at Fisheries Research and Training Institute, Manawan, Lahore. Fish fingerlings in equal densities, i.e. 2000 ha-1were stocked with two combinations(i.e. two treatments) in triplicate and fed with supplementary feed containing 25% crude protein @ 3%of live body weight. Fortnightweights, net weight gains (NWG), percentage weight gain (PWG), specific growth rate (SGR),gross and net fish productions/ha/year were calculated. Comparison through multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) showed that final weights of Labeorohita, Catlacatla and Ctenopharyngodonidella were significantly higher in T1 (P < 0.05) than in T2, while of Cirrhinusmrigala and Hypophthalmichthesmolitrix did not varied statistically (P > 0.05).The inclusion of mahseer in 2ndtreatment did not affect the survival rate of experimental fish species.It can be concluded that endemic Indus mahseer can survive and grow under warm water polyculture, however it has significant negative effects on growth of Labeorohita, Catlacatla and if prolonged onCtenopharyngodonidella and also on overall per unit fish production. © 2015, Pakistan Agricultural Scientists Forum. All rights reserved.

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