Fisheries Experiment Station

Logan, UT, United States

Fisheries Experiment Station

Logan, UT, United States
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Wagner E.J.,Fisheries Experiment Station | Bartley M.,Fisheries Experiment Station | Arndt R.,Fisheries Experiment Station | Oplinger R.W.,Fisheries Experiment Station | Routledge M.D.,Fisheries Experiment Station
Journal of Aquatic Animal Health | Year: 2012

Awhirling-disease-resistant strain of rainbowtrout Oncorhynchus mykiss (GRHL strain) derived froma backcross of an F1 hybrid of two strains (German strain × Harrison Lake strain) with German strain females, was compared with the Ten Sleep (TS) strain of rainbow trout. The GRHL strain had consistently superior growth and feed conversion in two consecutive hatchery trials. Hatching and mortality rates were similar between strains. Both strains were stocked into two Utah reservoirs (Hyrum, Porcupine), and a third, Causey Reservoir, was monitored as a control for seasonal variation in prevalence of Myxobolus cerebralis. A total of 1,323 salmonids captured by gill net in spring and fall sampling between 2006 and 2008 were tested for M. cerebralis via pepsin-trypsin digest methods. Only eight of these (<1% per species) had clinical signs consistent with whirling disease. In both reservoirs, GRHL survived better than the TS and had higher growth rates. The prevalence of M. cerebralis was significantly lower for GRHL (18.1%) than TS (50.0%) in Porcupine Reservoir. In Hyrum Reservoir the trend was similar, but prevalence was lower and did not significantly differ between GRHL (9.6%) and TS (23.1%). For infected fish, no significant differences were observed between strains in myxospore counts in either Hyrum (GRHL = 911-28,244 spores/fish [spf], TS = 1,822-155,800 spf) or Porcupine (GRHL = 333-426,667spf, TS = 333-230,511 spf) reservoirs. Unmarked rainbow trout in both reservoirs had significantly higher myxospore counts than stocked fish of either strain. There were significant differences in M. cerebralis prevalence and myxospore loads among other naturally reproducing salmonids in the reservoirs. The trend in susceptibility was cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii >kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka > brown trout Salmo trutta. The GRHL performed well in both hatchery and field settings and is recommended for stocking programs. © American Fisheries Society 2012.


PubMed | Fisheries Experiment Station
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of aquatic animal health | Year: 2012

A whirling-disease-resistant strain of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (GRHL strain) derived from a backcross of an F1 hybrid of two strains (German strain x Harrison Lake strain) with German strain females, was compared with the Ten Sleep (TS) strain of rainbow trout. The GRHL strain had consistently superior growth and feed conversion in two consecutive hatchery trials. Hatching and mortality rates were similar between strains. Both strains were stocked into two Utah reservoirs (Hyrum, Porcupine), and a third, Causey Reservoir, was monitored as a control for seasonal variation in prevalence of Myxobolus cerebralis. A total of 1,323 salmonids captured by gill net in spring and fall sampling between 2006 and 2008 were tested for M. cerebralis via pepsin-trypsin digest methods. Only eight of these (< 1% per species) had clinical signs consistent with whirling disease. In both reservoirs, GRHL survived better than the TS and had higher growth rates. The prevalence of M. cerebralis was significantly lower for GRHL (18.1%) than TS (50.0%) in Porcupine Reservoir. In Hyrum Reservoir the trend was similar, but prevalence was lower and did not significantly differ between GRHL (9.6%) and TS (23.1%). For infected fish, no significant differences were observed between strains in myxospore counts in either Hyrum (GRHL = 911-28,244 spores/fish [spf], TS = 1,822-155,800 spf) or Porcupine (GRHL = 333-426,667spf, TS = 333-230,511 spf) reservoirs. Unmarked rainbow trout in both reservoirs had significantly higher myxospore counts than stocked fish of either strain. There were significant differences in M. cerebralis prevalence and myxospore loads among other naturally reproducing salmonids in the reservoirs. The trend in susceptibility was cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii > kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka > brown trout Salmo trutta. The GRHL performed well in both hatchery and field settings and is recommended for stocking programs.

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