Boston, MA, United States
Boston, MA, United States

Fisher College is a private, nonprofit, independent institution that grants both baccalaureate and associate degrees to a coeducational student body. Fisher's main campus is located on Beacon Street in the Back Bay neighborhood of Boston, and its satellite locations include North Attleborough, Brockton, and New Bedford. The College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges . Wikipedia.

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News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has evaluated the top colleges in New York state for 2017. Of the 50 four-year schools who made the site’s “Best” list, Columbia University in the City of New York, Cornell University, Yeshiva University, University of Rochester and New York University were in the top five. Of the 39 two-year schools that were included, Monroe Community College, Hudson Valley Community College, Niagara County Community College, SUNY Westchester Community College and Genesee Community college took the top five spots. A full list of schools is included below. “New York state offers a wide variety of educational options, but the schools on our list are those going the extra mile for students,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “Not only do they offer outstanding certificate and degree programs, they also provide students with resources that help them make successful career choices after college.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in New York” list, institutions must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit schools. Each college is ranked on additional statistics including the number of degree programs offered, the availability of career and academic resources, the opportunity for financial aid, graduation rates and annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in New York” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in New York for 2017 include: Adelphi University Alfred University Barnard College Canisius College Clarkson University Colgate University College of Mount Saint Vincent Columbia University in the City of New York Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art Cornell University CUNY Bernard M Baruch College CUNY City College CUNY Hunter College CUNY Queens College Daemen College D'Youville College Fordham University Hamilton College Hartwick College Hobart William Smith Colleges Hofstra University Houghton College Iona College Ithaca College Le Moyne College LIU Post Manhattan College Manhattanville College Marist College Molloy College Nazareth College New York University Niagara University Pace University-New York Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Rochester Institute of Technology Saint John Fisher College Saint Joseph's College-New York Siena College St Bonaventure University St John's University-New York St Lawrence University Stony Brook University SUNY at Binghamton Syracuse University Union College University at Buffalo University of Rochester Vassar College Yeshiva University The Best Two-Year Colleges in New York for 2017 include: Adirondack Community College Bramson ORT College Bronx Community College Cayuga County Community College Clinton Community College Columbia-Greene Community College Corning Community College CUNY Borough of Manhattan Community College CUNY LaGuardia Community College Dutchess Community College Erie Community College Finger Lakes Community College Fulton-Montgomery Community College Genesee Community College Herkimer County Community College Hostos Community College Hudson Valley Community College Jamestown Community College Jefferson Community College Kingsborough Community College Mohawk Valley Community College Monroe Community College Nassau Community College New York Methodist Hospital Center for Allied Health Education Niagara County Community College North Country Community College Onondaga Community College Professional Business College Queensborough Community College Rockland Community College Schenectady County Community College Stella and Charles Guttman Community College Suffolk County Community College SUNY Broome Community College SUNY Orange SUNY Sullivan SUNY Ulster SUNY Westchester Community College Tompkins Cortland Community College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

LOUISVILLE, Ky.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Hilliard Lyons announced today that Thomas B. Kessinger III, a veteran Financial Consultant in its Lexington office, has been named President of the firm and will also join its board of directors. Kessinger moves into the role previously held by James R. Allen, who remains CEO and will become the Chairman of Hilliard Lyons. Hilliard Lyons is a leading wealth management firm with more than 70 offices in 12 Midwestern and southern states. Allen commented, “Our board wants to ensure strong, seamless leadership during a time when the wealth management industry has been undergoing significant change. Tom is an insider who fully understands Hilliard Lyons’ legacy and unique culture. Tom has proven himself at every stage of his professional development – and, after a short transition, will be prepared to lead this organization into the future. He will have my full support as he transitions to this new role.” Kessinger added, “I’m deeply honored to be named President. I have spent my whole career as part of the Hilliard Lyons family, and I am eager to help lead the firm more directly, even as our industry faces regulatory and strategic challenges. We will continue to support our Financial Consultants fully as they help clients build, manage, protect, and transition their wealth.” Kessinger, 47, is from Lexington, Kentucky, where he graduated from Tates Creek High School in 1989. After graduating with a BS in accounting in 1993 from the University of Kentucky, he joined his grandfather at Hilliard Lyons as a Financial Consultant. During the next 15 years (until his grandfather retired), Kessinger grew an existing book of business from $80 million to over $350 million in assets. Today, Kessinger leads the Kessinger-Lee Financial Group, a six-person team in the firm’s Lexington-Beaumont office that manages assets exceeding $440 million. The team brings together the firm’s unique resources of portfolio management, trust services, financial planning, and risk management to provide comprehensive wealth management to high-net-worth clients. As Kessinger transitions fully into his new role, his team members in Lexington will assume responsibility for serving his clients. Kessinger graduated from the Chartered Wealth Advisor program in 2004, from the Securities Industry Institute at Wharton Business School in 2006, the Preferred Portfolio Management Course in 2014, and the Wealth Planning Essentials program at Wharton Business School in 2016. Kessinger was named as an On Wall Street Top 40 under 40 Advisor in 2007 and 2008. He was named Vice President in 1997, First Vice President in 1999, and Senior Vice President in 2000. Hilliard Lyons recognized him as a President’s Club-level producer from 2000 through 2005 and as a CEO Council-level producer since 2006. Kessinger’s community involvement has included serving on numerous boards, including those of Worldwide Hearts & Hands, Lexington Philharmonic, and Child Development Center of the Bluegrass, where he served as board chair. Kessinger was also the Campaign Chairman of LexArts and Dynamic Doors. Kessinger is married and has three children. James Allen has devoted his entire working career to Hilliard Lyons after joining the firm in 1981. After being named President of Hilliard Lyons in 2003, Allen was elected Chairman and CEO of the company effective January 1, 2004. Allen is active in the financial services industry and with the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, where he currently serves on the board of directors and chairs the Regional Firms Committee. Allen is involved civically in Louisville, where he is the current Board Chairman of the Jefferson County Public Education Foundation, former Chairman of the Fund for the Arts Board of Directors and past Chairman of the Louisville Downtown Development Corporation Board of Directors. He chaired the 2016 Metro United Way Campaign for Greater Louisville. He also serves on the Advisory Board for the University of Louisville School of Business, the Board of Trustees of Bellarmine University, and the Dean’s Advisory Council for the Fisher College of Business at the Ohio State University. Allen was inducted into the Junior Achievement Kentuckiana Business Hall of Fame in 2015. He received the 2013 Joseph W. Kelly Award, presented annually by the Kentucky Board of Education for support in promoting school improvement. In 2009, he was awarded the YMCA Spirit of Louisville Award, and in 2008, he was named the Business First Business Leader of the Year (large-company category). Allen holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from DePauw University and an MBA in finance from the Ohio State University. He is also a Chartered Financial Analyst. Allen is married with one daughter. Founded in 1854 and operating over 70 offices in 12 Midwestern and Southeastern states, Hilliard Lyons (www.hilliard.com) focuses on creating, preserving, and distributing its clients’ wealth. The firm specializes in planning issues that include education funding, business succession, retirement, and trusts and estates – to advise clients through life’s financial challenges. J.J.B. Hilliard, W.L. Lyons, LLC is a member of the New York Stock Exchange, FINRA, and SIPC.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Flash Global, a leading provider of end-to-end service supply chain solutions on a global scale, recently hosted a group of graduate students from The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business, giving them the opportunity to gain real-world experience in addressing logistics and service supply chain business needs. The event took place April 26 at the company’s state-of-the-art Global Service Center in Lockbourne, Ohio. “As Flash Global continues to define the service supply chain and drive the strategic value it brings to companies of all sizes in the international marketplace, we’re always looking for new, innovative ways to refine operations and processes to meet customers’ needs. Partnering with best and brightest students enrolled Masters of Business Logistics Engineering (MBLE) program has enabled us to design and execute on six engineering-related projects that have led to streamlined efficiencies in aspects of our business,” said Ted Waggoner, Sr. Director, IT PMO for Flash. The prestigious MBLE program is designed to enable students to enter the job market equally comfortable with logistics strategy, the management of logistics operations, and engineering tasks. This internship-like collaboration with Flash, which started in 2016, has afforded opportunities for 35 students to work on projects such as reducing cycle times in the Repair and Configure to Order lines, creation of Value Stream Mapping, Receiving Area Efficiency Improvement Analysis and more. “Flash has benefited from the energetic and innovative approach of these international students, while providing them with access to a world-class facility and the opportunity to develop real-world, real-time strategic analysis for service supply chain solutions through collaboration with our expert teams. We could not be more thrilled with the relationship we are developing with The Ohio State University and its MBLE program. Although we just completed our second engagement, our teams are already looking forward to next year’s group of students and the projects we will work on together,” said Sam Mikles, President and CEO of Flash Global. To learn more about custom service supply chain solutions designed from an integrated suite of services that are flexible and scalable to meet customer demands today and in the future, connect with Flash Global today. ABOUT FLASH GLOBAL Headquartered in New Jersey (USA), Flash Global provides the industry’s most comprehensive end-to-end suite of global service supply chain solutions that support many of the top OEMs in the world with either emerging or established technologies. Committed to a relentless pursuit of excellence, Flash offers an immense global infrastructure that enables companies to instantly scale in 140+ countries, creating consistency, predictability and visibility into their service supply chain. Flash has in-region and in-country expertise across its Global Command Centers, Global Service Centers, and immense network of global stocking and import/export locations to service OEMs’ customer bases.


News Article | December 8, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Nothing ruins a potentially fun event like putting it on your calendar. In a series of studies, researchers found that scheduling a leisure activity like seeing a movie or taking a coffee break led people to anticipate less enjoyment and actually enjoy the event less than if the same activities were unplanned. That doesn't mean you can't plan at all: The research showed that roughly planning an event (but not giving a specific time) led to similar levels of enjoyment as unplanned events. "People associate schedules with work. We want our leisure time to be free-flowing," said Selin Malkoc, co-author of the study and assistant professor of marketing at The Ohio State University's Fisher College of Business. "Time is supposed to fly when you're having fun. Anything that limits and constrains our leisure chips away at the enjoyment." Malkoc conducted the study with Gabriela Tonietto, a doctoral student at Washington University in St. Louis. Their results are published in the Journal of Marketing Research. In the paper, they report on 13 separate studies that looked at how scheduling leisure activities affects the way we think about and experience them. In one study, college students were given a calendar filled with classes and extracurricular activities and asked to imagine that this was their actual schedule for the week. Half of the participants were then asked to make plans to get frozen yogurt with a friend two days in advance and add the activity to their calendar. The other half imagined running into a friend and deciding to get frozen yogurt immediately. Results showed that those who scheduled getting frozen yogurt with their friend rated the activity as feeling more like a "commitment" and "chore" than those who imagined the impromptu get-together. "Scheduling our fun activities leads them to take on qualities of work," Malkoc said. The effect is not just for hypothetical activities. In an online study, the researchers had people select an entertaining YouTube video to watch. The catch was that some got to watch their chosen video immediately. Others chose a specific date and time to watch the video and put in on their calendar. Results showed that those who watched the scheduled video enjoyed it less than those who watched it immediately. While people seem to get less enjoyment out of precisely scheduled activities, they don't seem to mind if they are more roughly scheduled. In another study, the researchers set up a stand on a college campus where they gave out free coffee and cookies for students studying for finals. Before setting up the stand, they handed out tickets for students to pick up their coffee and cookies either at a specific time or during a two-hour window. As they were enjoying their treat, the students filled out a short survey. The results showed that those who had a specifically scheduled break enjoyed their time off less than did those who only roughly scheduled the break. "If you schedule leisure activities only roughly, the negative effects of scheduling disappear," Malkoc said. Aim to meet a friend "this afternoon" rather than exactly at 1 p.m. One study showed that even just setting a starting time for a fun activity is enough to make it less enjoyable. "People don't want to put time restrictions of any kind on otherwise free-flowing leisure activities," she said. Malkoc said these findings apply to short leisure activities that last a few hours or less. The results also have implications for leisure companies that provide experiences for their customers, Malkoc said. For example, some amusement parks offer tickets for their most popular rides that allow people to avoid long lines. But this research suggests that people will enjoy these rides less if the tickets are set for a particular time. Instead, the parks should give people a window of time to board the ride, which would be the equivalent of rough scheduling in this study.


News Article | December 8, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Nothing ruins a potentially fun event like putting it on your calendar. In a series of studies, researchers found that scheduling a leisure activity like seeing a movie or taking a coffee break led people to anticipate less enjoyment and actually enjoy the event less than if the same activities were unplanned. That doesn't mean you can't plan at all: The research showed that roughly planning an event (but not giving a specific time) led to similar levels of enjoyment as unplanned events. "People associate schedules with work. We want our leisure time to be free-flowing," said Selin Malkoc, co-author of the study and assistant professor of marketing at The Ohio State University's Fisher College of Business. "Time is supposed to fly when you're having fun. Anything that limits and constrains our leisure chips away at the enjoyment." Malkoc conducted the study with Gabriela Tonietto, a doctoral student at Washington University in St. Louis. Their results are published in the Journal of Marketing Research. In the paper, they report on 13 separate studies that looked at how scheduling leisure activities affects the way we think about and experience them. In one study, college students were given a calendar filled with classes and extracurricular activities and asked to imagine that this was their actual schedule for the week. Half of the participants were then asked to make plans to get frozen yogurt with a friend two days in advance and add the activity to their calendar. The other half imagined running into a friend and deciding to get frozen yogurt immediately. Results showed that those who scheduled getting frozen yogurt with their friend rated the activity as feeling more like a "commitment" and "chore" than those who imagined the impromptu get-together. "Scheduling our fun activities leads them to take on qualities of work," Malkoc said. The effect is not just for hypothetical activities. In an online study, the researchers had people select an entertaining YouTube video to watch. The catch was that some got to watch their chosen video immediately. Others chose a specific date and time to watch the video and put in on their calendar. Results showed that those who watched the scheduled video enjoyed it less than those who watched it immediately. While people seem to get less enjoyment out of precisely scheduled activities, they don't seem to mind if they are more roughly scheduled. In another study, the researchers set up a stand on a college campus where they gave out free coffee and cookies for students studying for finals. Before setting up the stand, they handed out tickets for students to pick up their coffee and cookies either at a specific time or during a two-hour window. As they were enjoying their treat, the students filled out a short survey. The results showed that those who had a specifically scheduled break enjoyed their time off less than did those who only roughly scheduled the break. "If you schedule leisure activities only roughly, the negative effects of scheduling disappear," Malkoc said. Aim to meet a friend "this afternoon" rather than exactly at 1 p.m. One study showed that even just setting a starting time for a fun activity is enough to make it less enjoyable. "People don't want to put time restrictions of any kind on otherwise free-flowing leisure activities," she said. Malkoc said these findings apply to short leisure activities that last a few hours or less. The results also have implications for leisure companies that provide experiences for their customers, Malkoc said. For example, some amusement parks offer tickets for their most popular rides that allow people to avoid long lines. But this research suggests that people will enjoy these rides less if the tickets are set for a particular time. Instead, the parks should give people a window of time to board the ride, which would be the equivalent of rough scheduling in this study.


News Article | December 19, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Consumers believe healthy food must be more expensive than cheap eats and that higher-priced food is healthier - even when there is no supporting evidence, according to new research. The results mean not only that marketers can charge more for products that are touted as healthy, but that consumers may not believe that a product is healthy if it doesn't cost more, researchers say. And this belief in the health power of expensive foods may lead people to some other surprising conclusions. For example, people in one study thought eye health was a more important issue for them when they were told about an expensive but unfamiliar food ingredient that would protect their vision. If the same ingredient was relatively cheap, people didn't think the issue it treated - eye health - was as important. "It's concerning. The findings suggest that price of food alone can impact our perceptions of what is healthy and even what health issues we should be concerned about," said Rebecca Reczek, co-author of the study and professor of marketing at The Ohio State University's Fisher College of Business. Reczek conducted the study with Kelly Haws of Vanderbilt University and Kevin Sample of the University of Georgia. Their results appear online in the Journal of Consumer Research. Reczek said she and her colleagues conducted the study to examine the lay theory that we have to pay more to eat healthfully. Lay theories are the common-sense explanations people use to understand the world around them, whether they are true or not. Messages consistent with the healthy = expensive lay theory are all around us, she said. One example is the "Whole Paycheck" nickname people have given to Whole Foods, which touts itself as "America's Healthiest Grocery Store." There are certainly categories of food where healthy is more expensive, such as some organic and gluten-free products, Reczek said. But it is not necessarily true all the time. Still, this research wasn't meant to investigate the true relationship between healthy foods and price - just people's perceptions of that relationship. The researchers conducted five related studies, all with different participants. In one, participants were given information on what they were told was a new product called "granola bites," which was given a health grade of either A- or C. They were then asked to rate how expensive the product would be. Participants who were told the health grade was A- thought the granola bites would be more expensive than did those who were told the grade was C. In a second study, the researchers found that the healthy = expensive belief operates in both directions. In this study, participants rated a breakfast cracker that they were told was more expensive as healthier than an identical cracker that cost less. But could this lay belief influence how people act? In the next experiment, a different group of people was asked to imagine that a co-worker had asked them to order lunch for them. Half the people were told the co-worker wanted a healthy lunch, while the others weren't give any instructions. On a computer screen, participants were given their choice of two different chicken wraps to choose for their co-worker, one called the Chicken Balsamic Wrap and the other called the Roasted Chicken Wrap. The ingredients were listed for both. The key was that for some participants the Chicken Balsamic Wrap was listed as more expensive, and for others the Roasted Chicken Wrap cost more. Results showed that when participants were asked to pick the healthiest option, they were much more likely to choose the more expensive chicken wrap - regardless of which one it was. "People don't just believe that healthy means more expensive - they're making choices based on that belief," Reczek said. It was the results of the next study that most intrigued Reczek. In this experiment, participants were told to imagine they were at a grocery store to buy trail mix and they were presented with four options, all at different price points. The option that the researchers were interested in was called the "Perfect Vision Mix." Some participants saw the mix touted as "Rich in Vitamin A for eye health." Others saw the line "Rich in DHA for eye health." While both Vitamin A and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) are indeed good for eye health, the researchers had previously determined that few people are familiar with DHA. Some participants saw the trail mix listed at an average price, while others saw it listed at a premium price above the other three trail mixes. Participants were then asked about their perceptions of the key ingredient in the trail mix, either Vitamin A or DHA. When the ingredient was Vitamin A, people thought it was equally important in a healthy diet, regardless of the price. But if the ingredient was DHA, participants thought it was a more important part of a healthy diet if it was in the expensive trail mix than when it was in the average-priced mix. "People are familiar with Vitamin A, so they feel they can judge its value without any price cues," Reczek said. "But people don't know much about DHA, so they go back to the lay theory that expensive must be healthier." But the healthy = expensive theory had an even more surprising effect. When participants were told DHA helped prevent macular degeneration, people thought this was a more important health issue when the trail mix with DHA was more expensive. When the DHA product was an average price, they were less concerned about macular degeneration. This effect was not seen with people who were told the trail mix had Vitamin A - again, probably because it was more familiar to the participants, Reczek said. In the final study, participants were asked to evaluate a new product that would have the brand slogan "Healthiest Protein Bar on the Planet." They were told this bar would compete against other products that averaged $2 per bar. Some participants were told this new bar would be $0.99, while others were told it would be $4. They were then given the opportunity to read reviews of the bar before they offered their own evaluation. Findings showed the participants read significantly more reviews when they were told the bar would cost only $0.99 than when it cost $4. "People just couldn't believe that the 'healthiest protein bar on the planet' would cost less than the average bar," Reczek said. "They had to read more to convince themselves this was true. They were much more willing to accept that the healthy bar would cost twice as much as average." While these results may be concerning for consumers, Reczek said there is a remedy. "We need to be aware of our expensive-equals-healthy bias and look to overcome it by searching out objective evidence," Reczek said. "It makes it easier for us when we're shopping to use this lay theory, and just assume we're getting something healthier when we pay more. But we don't have to be led astray. We can compare nutrition labels and we can do research before we go to the grocery store. We can use facts rather than our intuition."


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

randrr, a career opportunities platform for the common good, today announced strategy and business operations expert Andy Spriggs will join its team as chief operating officer. Spriggs’ extensive list of accomplishments includes holding the titles of: “I am thrilled to have Andy Spriggs join randrr as chief operating officer,” said Terry Terhark, founder and CEO of randrr. “His diverse experience and leadership will help grow randrr as we bring our platform to market. Andy's background and experience working in this industry will help guide randrr as a market-leading solution for people to discover their career destiny.” “randrr has created a remarkable, disruptive brand, and I am beyond excited to be a part of this emerging company,” said Spriggs. “The team is building a platform that will revolutionize and reinvent recruiting forever, and that’s something I’m incredibly passionate about.” Spriggs holds a master’s degree in business administration from The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business and a bachelor’s degree from The Ohio State University. About randrr randrr (Reinvent and Revolutionize Recruiting) puts the power in the hands of people looking for career opportunities. With randrr, you can gain transparency into the companies you love, research and discover opportunities, engage employers, or get hired — all while keeping your privacy intact. No more getting profiled by endless headhunters. No more resume black holes. No more wondering where you stand after you express interest in an opportunity. randrr helps people discover their career destiny.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best schools with online programs in the state of New York for 2017. More than 70 schools were ranked overall, with Columbia University, New York University, Cornell University, Syracuse University and University at Buffalo coming in as the top four-year schools. Among two-year schools, Monroe Community College, Niagara County Community College, Hudson Valley Community College, Genesee Community College and Tompkins Cortland Community College earned top spots. “College-bound students have many options for post-secondary education in New York state, but they don’t necessarily need to travel to a campus to be successful,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “The schools on this list are strong examples of what today’s online learning is all about: providing quality education to enhance student success outside of a traditional classroom environment.” Schools on the Best Online Schools list must meet specific base requirements to be included: each must be institutionally accredited and be classified as public or private not-for-profit. Each college was also scored based on additional criteria that includes cost and financial aid, variety of program offerings, student-teacher ratios, graduation rates, employment services and more. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: New York’s Best Online Four-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Adelphi University Canisius College Clarkson University Columbia University in the City of New York Concordia College-New York Cornell University CUNY Graduate School and University Center CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice Dominican College of Blauvelt D'Youville College Fordham University Hofstra University Ithaca College Jewish Theological Seminary of America Keuka College LIU Post Marist College Medaille College Mercy College Metropolitan College of New York Mount Saint Mary College New York Institute of Technology New York University Niagara University Nyack College Pace University-New York Roberts Wesleyan College Rochester Institute of Technology Saint John Fisher College Saint Joseph's College-New York St. Bonaventure University St. John's University-New York St. Thomas Aquinas College Stony Brook University SUNY at Albany SUNY at Binghamton SUNY Buffalo State SUNY College at Brockport SUNY College at Oswego SUNY College at Plattsburgh SUNY College of Technology at Canton SUNY College of Technology at Delhi SUNY Empire State College SUNY Institute of Technology at Utica-Rome SUNY Maritime College SUNY Oneonta Syracuse University The College of Saint Rose The New School The Sage Colleges New York’s Best Two Year Online Schools for 2017 include the following: Bramson ORT College Cayuga Community College Corning Community College CUNY Borough of Manhattan Community College Finger Lakes Community College Fulton-Montgomery Community College Genesee Community College Herkimer College Hostos Community College Hudson Valley Community College Jamestown Community College Jefferson Community College Mohawk Valley Community College Monroe Community College Niagara County Community College North Country Community College Suffolk County Community College SUNY Broome Community College SUNY Orange SUNY Ulster SUNY Westchester Community College Tompkins Cortland Community College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.

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