First Nations University of Canada

www.fnuniv.ca
Regina, Canada

The First Nations University of Canada , formerly the Saskatchewan Indian Federated College, is a Canadian university in Saskatchewan with campuses in Regina, Saskatoon, and Prince Albert. The Regina campus building was designed by the architect Douglas Cardinal. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

First Nations and Inuit babies were hospitalized much more often in the first year of life compared with non-Indigenous babies, many for preventable illnesses, found a new study of infant hospitalizations in Quebec, Canada, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www. . The study included 19 770 First Nations babies, 3930 Inuit and 225 380 non-Indigenous infants born between 1996 and 2010 in the province of Quebec. First Nations and Inuit mothers were much younger than non-Indigenous mothers, with 22% of First Nations and 27% of Inuit mothers under age 20 compared with non-Indigenous mothers (3.3%). Indigenous mothers were more likely to live alone and have lower education levels compared with non-Indigenous mothers. They also had higher rates of chronic diseases such as pre-existing diabetes, high blood pressure and kidney disease as well as pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension and preeclampsia. Both First Nations and Inuit infants are about twice as likely to be hospitalized in the first year of life compared with non-Indigenous infants. Respiratory diseases and infections were the most common causes of hospitalization. "The excess risks of these diseases may be related to infant immunizations and the quality of the living environment, and thus may be largely preventable, suggesting the need to improve infant immunization programs, promote breastfeeding and no smoking in the child's living environment, and improve living conditions in Indigenous communities," writes Drs. Hua He and Zhong-Cheng Luo, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai, China, and Sainte-Justine Hospital, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, with coauthors. "The findings identify substantial unmet needs in Indigenous infant disease prevention and medical care. There is an urgent need for interventions to reduce Indigenous versus non-Indigenous infant health inequalities," the authors conclude. The study was conducted by researchers at Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Sainte-Justine Hospital and University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec; Public Health Department, Cree Board of Health and Social Services, James Bay, Mistissini, Quebec; First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission, Wendake, Quebec; and Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services, Kuujjuaq, Quebec.


PubMed | University of Saskatchewan, Monash University, First Nations University of Canada and Member of Community Matters
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Healthcare quarterly (Toronto, Ont.) | Year: 2014

The Saskatchewan Ministry of Health has committed to a multi-million dollar investment toward the implementation of Lean methodology across the provinces healthcare system. Originating as a production line discipline (the Toyota Production System), Lean has evolved to encompass process improvements including inventory management, waste reduction and quality improvement techniques. With an initial focus on leadership, strategic alignment, training and the creation of a supportive infrastructure (Lean promotion offices), the goal in Saskatchewan is a whole health system transformation that produces better health, better value, better care, and better teams. Given the scope and scale of the initiative and the commitment of resources, it is vital that a comprehensive, longitudinal evaluation plan be implemented to support ongoing decision-making and program design. The nature of the initiative also offers a unique opportunity to contribute to health quality improvement science by advancing our understanding of the implementation and evaluation of complex, large-scale healthcare interventions. The purpose of this article is to summarize the background to Lean in Saskatchewan and the proposed evaluation methods.


PubMed | St Pauls Hospital, University of Saskatchewan and First Nations University of Canada
Type: | Journal: Journal of evaluation in clinical practice | Year: 2016

In Canada, Aboriginal people, particularly First Nations experience significant health disparities and a lower health status compared with the non-Aboriginal population.The purpose of this study was to examine the demographic and clinical characteristics of First Nations patients admitted to hospitals in Saskatchewan, and the acute care services used by First Nations compared with non-First Nations, specifically hospital length of stay. Primary residence of patients was also mapped to determine geographic patterns that would inform health service provision.A retrospective medical chart audit was carried out to collect data on patient demographics and clinical characteristics of 203 First Nations and 200 non-First Nations patients admitted to two urban hospitals in Saskatchewan from 2012 to 2014.The most common reason for admission of First Nations and non-First Nations patients was infection (24.6%) and cardiology conditions (19.5%), respectively. There was no significant difference in mean length of stay for First Nations (10.44days) compared with non-First Nations (10.57days). After adjusting for age, mean length of stay for First Nations was nearly 3days longer than non-First Nations. First Nations patients residence was from across the broad geography of Saskatchewan, with 45% living in rural communities or on reserve.The outcomes of this study are clinically meaningful and support the need for research, in collaboration with Aboriginal patients and families, to further examine and improve the care experience in order to decrease health disparities for Aboriginal patients in Canada.


Miller A.M.,First Nations University of Canada | Davidson-Hunt I.,Natural Resources Canada | Davidson-Hunt I.,University of Manitoba
Ecology and Society | Year: 2013

Although scholars of social-ecological resilience propose unity between humans and the natural world, much of this work remains based on Cartesian division of mind and body that denies it. We present an example of a unified system of resilience thinking shared with us by Anishinaabe (Ojibway) elders of Pikangikum First Nation, northwestern Ontario. The elders' views of boreal forest disturbance and renewal are distinct from western scientific approaches in their recognition of agency, the ability to individually express free will in nonhuman beings including animals, plants, rocks, and forest fire within their landscape. Pikangikum elders perceive that, if relationships based on respect, reciprocity, and noninterference are maintained with other agents, renewal will continue. The proposition of living landscapes composed of diverse nonhuman agents poses challenges to collaboration with western worldviews, which view nature largely as mechanistic and without moral standing. We suggest that a greater attention to nonwestern ontologies can contribute to productive cross-cultural partnerships directed toward fostering resilience. © 2013 by the author(s).


PubMed | University of New Brunswick, University of Saskatchewan, First Nations University of Canada, Engagement Labs and University of Ottawa
Type: | Journal: Psycho-oncology | Year: 2016

First Nations people with cancer in Canada confront several critical inequities in physical and psychosocial domains. First Nations women are at a particular disadvantage as they are disproportionately affected by social determinants of health, but how they navigate these challenges within their communities is poorly understood.Our study explores survivorship experiences of First Nations women with cancer and their caregivers. Drawing from a larger data set on survivorship, we identify several major barriers to cancer communication and support in First Nations communities.Our team conducted a participatory, arts-based study using several data collection methods (interviews, sharing sessions, photovoice and other creative activities) with 43 participants (24 cancer survivors and 19 caregivers) from four First Nations communities in Canada.Two major themes have emerged out of our data analyses: 1) suffering without support leads to cycles of silence, and 2) community-based supports can disrupt these cycles. We identified several social, historical and institutional barriers to speaking about cancer and finding/providing support; however, communities met the challenge of silence through voluntary and unsolicited provision of support.Widespread silence around cancer reflects both the limited access First Nations people have to formal, supportive programs and services, as well as the creative ways they provide emotional, social, and financial support within their informal networks. Beyond the support of their communities, they also required institutional provision of care that is culturally safe, addressing the colonial impacts on cancer communication and the disproportionate burdens of disease in First Nations communities.


Morgan D.G.,University of Saskatchewan | Crossley M.,University of Saskatchewan | Kirk A.,University of Saskatchewan | McBain L.,First Nations University of Canada | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Applied Gerontology | Year: 2011

Using data from a sample of 169 patients, this study evaluates the acceptability and feasibility of telehealth videoconferencing for preclinic assessment and follow-up in an interprofessional memory clinic for rural and remote seniors. Patients and caregivers are seen via telehealth prior to the in-person clinic and followed up at 6 weeks, 12 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and yearly. Patients are randomly assigned to in-person (standard care) or telehealth for the first follow-up, then alternating between the two modes of treatment, prior to 1-year follow-up. On average, telehealth appointments reduce participants' travel by 426 km per round trip. Findings show that telehealth coordinators rated 85% of patients and 92% of caregivers as comfortable or very comfortable during telehealth. Satisfaction scales completed by patient-caregiver dyads show high satisfaction with telehealth. Follow-up questionnaires reveal similar satisfaction with telehealth and in-person appointments, but telehealth is rated as significantly more convenient. Predictors of discontinuing follow-up are greater distance to telehealth, old-age patient, lower telehealth satisfaction, and lower caregiver burden. © The Author(s) 2011.


PubMed | University of Western Ontario, University of Saskatchewan, First Nations University of Canada and Loma Linda Medical Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of applied gerontology : the official journal of the Southern Gerontological Society | Year: 2014

Using data from a sample of 169 patients, this study evaluates the acceptability and feasibility of telehealth videoconferencing for preclinic assessment and follow-up in an interprofessional memory clinic for rural and remote seniors. Patients and caregivers are seen via telehealth prior to the in-person clinic, and followed at 6 weeks, 12 weeks, 6 months, one year, and yearly. Patients are randomly assigned to in-person (standard care) or telehealth for the first follow-up, then alternating between the two modes of treatment, prior to 1-year follow-up. On average, telehealth appointments reduce participants travel by 426 km per round trip. Findings show that telehealth coordinators rated 85% of patients and 92% of caregiversas comfortable or very comfortable during telehealth. Satisfaction scales completed by patient-caregiver dyads show high satisfaction with telehealth. Follow-up questionnaires reveal similar satisfaction with telehealth and in-person appointments, but telehealth is rated as significantly more convenient. Predictors of discontinuing follow-up are greater distance to telehealth, old-age patient, lower telehealth satisfaction, and lower caregiver burden.


Smith H.A.,University of Northern | Sharp K.,First Nations University of Canada
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change | Year: 2012

This article describes, assesses, and explains the growing status of indigenous knowledges (IKs) in climate science and politics. Informed by a critical environmental perspective we review the literature on traditional ecological knowledge (TEK), explore the contested nature of this concept, and identify the numerous epistemological obstacles to the appropriate and respectful inclusion of traditional ecological knowledge. While we believe that TEK and Western science are complementary, the inclusion of TEK in climate science and politics has been uneven. In support of our argument, we present a framework for assessment of degrees of inclusion of TEK and apply the framework to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the Kyoto Protocol, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fourth Assessment Report (AR4), and the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA). We find that the UNFCCC and the Kyoto Protocol do not account for either indigenous peoples or indigenous people's knowledges. The AR4 includes some references to indigenous peoples but they are often buried in regional chapters. The ACIA is the most inclusive of all the documents examined and represents an important starting point for the inclusion of IKs. Based on the findings of our assessment, we conclude with recommendations for moving forward with greater inclusion of IKs. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Greer S.,First Nations University of Canada | Strand D.,Champagne and Aishihik First Nations
Arctic | Year: 2012

South Yukon First Nations governments are partners in the Yukon Ice Patch Project investigating the mountaintop snow and ice patches where ancient hunting artifacts are being recovered. Heritage programs operated by these governments, which coordinate their citizens' engagement in these activities, emphasize intangible cultural heritage. They view the project as an opportunity to strengthen culture, enhance citizens' understanding of their history, and express First Nations values regarding cultural resources. As the primary mammal subsistence species for south Yukon Indian people is now moose, the ice patch discoveries highlight the historical role of caribou in their culture and increase awareness of the environmental history of their homelands. The cultural landscape concept is used to frame the present indigenous involvement in the Yukon ice patch investigations, as well as the past use of these unique landscape features and ancient land-use patterns. The Yukon Ice Patch Project reflects the contemporary context of the territory, where indigenous governments are actively involved in managing and interpreting their cultural heritage. © The Arctic Institute of North America.


Hampton M.,University of Regina | Baydala A.,University of Regina | Bourassa C.,First Nations University of Canada | McKay-McNabb K.,First Nations University of Canada | McNabb P.,First Nations University of Canada
Journal of Palliative Care | Year: 2010

In this article, we share words spoken by Aboriginal elders from Saskatchewan, Canada, in response to the research question, "What would you like non-Aboriginal health care providers to know when providing end-of-life care for Aboriginal families?" Our purpose in publishing these results in a written format is to place information shared by oral tradition in an academic context and to make the information accessible to other researchers. Recent theoretical work in the areas of death and dying suggests that cultural beliefs and practices are particularly influential at the end of life; however, little work describing the traditional beliefs and practices of Aboriginal peoples in Canada exists to guide culturally appropriate end-of-life care delivery. Purposive sampling procedures were used to recruit five elders from culturally diverse First Nations in southern Saskatchewan. Key informant Aboriginal elder participants were videotaped by two Aboriginal research assistants, who approached the elders at powwows. Narrative analysis of the key informant interview transcripts was conducted to identify key concepts and emerging narrative themes describing culturally appropriate end-of-life health care for Aboriginal families. Six themes were identified to organize the data into a coherent narrative: realization; gathering of community; care and comfort/transition; moments after death; grief, wake, funeral; and messages to health care providers. These themes told the story of the dying person's journey and highlighted important messages from elders to non-Aboriginal health care providers. © 2010 Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal.

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