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Li Y.-Y.,Sixth Peoples Hospital of Hebei Province | Wang H.-Y.,Sixth Peoples Hospital of Hebei Province | Cui L.-J.,Sixth Peoples Hospital of Hebei Province | Sang W.-H.,Sixth Peoples Hospital of Hebei Province | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Dalian Medical University | Year: 2014

Objective: To systematicly evaluate the efficacy of Brisking treating Schizophrenia, providing reference for the reasonable use of this drug.Methods: We searched CBM, CNKI for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi - randomization controlled trials. Quality assessment and data extraction were conducted by two reviewers independently. Meta - analyses were conducted with the Cochrane Collaboration' s RevMan 5. 0 software.Results: Seven trials met the inclusion criteria.Results: Showed: The effects for Schizophrenia are no significant difference between brisking and other non - classical antipsychotics [RR = 1.01,95% CI (0.93,1. 10), P= 0.77]. The effects for Schizophrenia are also no significant difference between Brisking and classical - antipsychotics [RR = 1.02,95% CI(0. 95,1. 09), P = 0. 68].Conclusion: No significant differences were observed in the effects between brisking and other antipsychotics for Schizophrenia, We could expand its use, especially for incipient patients and elderly patients.


Xu X.-F.,Capital Medical University | Guo H.-P.,First Hospital of Handan | Ren X.-J.,Capital Medical University | Gong D.,Capital Medical University | And 6 more authors.
International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine | Year: 2014

Decellularization provides low immunogenicity and is only slightly subject to calcification in tissue engineering. However, the mechanical properties of the tissues are weakened after decellularization. We adopted cross-linking agent 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) to treat decellularized porcine pulmonary artery valvular leaflets to improve their mechanical properties. Twenty porcine pulmonary artery valvular leaflets were divided into three groups: the fresh control group A, group B treated with trypsin and Triton X-100 to remove cells, and group C cross-linked with EDC after decellularization. All samples were evaluated the physical and mechanical properties and were then subcutaneously embedded in rabbits. These valvular leaflets were removed after 1, 2, or 4 weeks and checked for pathological changes. The cells of the valvular leaflets were completely removed. The thickness of the valvular leaflets was thinner in group B than in group A (P<0.01). In the subcutaneous embedding of the group B samples, there was mild immunological response after 1-2 weeks, and parts of the scaffolds were degraded. After 4 weeks, fibroblasts had grown into the scaffolds. In group C, there was an increase in the tensile strength and thermal shrinkage temperature in group C compared with group B (P<0.01). In subcutaneous embedding of the group C samples, there was a mild immunological response after 1-2 weeks. The fibroblasts had grown into the samples. The EDC-based cross-linking procedure can enhance the tensile strength of decellularized pulmonary artery valvular leaflets and both decrease the valvular leaflets' rejection and promote tissue regeneration in vivo.


Xu X.-F.,Capital Medical University | Wang Z.-H.,Daxing Hospital | An G.-Y.,Jining Medical College Hospital | Guo H.-P.,First Hospital of Handan | And 7 more authors.
International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine | Year: 2013

Mitral valve-related operations are easy to perform and show good results, but to prevent severe thromboembolism or a high ratio of prosthetic valve destruction by tissue, lifetime anticoagulant therapy is essential after the operation. Thus, identifying a new type of surgical procedure and prosthetic valve to cure mitral valve diseases is necessary. Pulmonary valve autograft transplantation (Ross II) with the "top hat" transplantation technique was first reported by Ross DN to cure mitral disease. Because the "top hat" procedure has some shortcomings, we designed the scaffold-pulmonary autograft transplantation procedure and performed animal experiments to confirm the feasibility and effectiveness of the procedure. A total of 13 minipigs, weighing 20-25 kg, were employed as experimental animals to undergo scaffold-pulmonary autograft valve transplantation in our surgical animal lab. The surgical procedure was performed under hypothermic general anaesthesia and extracorporeal circulation (or cardiopulmonary bypass, CPB). Briefly, the chest cave was opened through the left intercostal, the pulmonary valve autograft was harvested during on-pump beating heart, and the pulmonary valve autograft was mounted in a selfmade pulmonary valve scaffold and transferred to the mitral valve annulus without removing the mitral instruments. Finally, the outflow tract of the right ventricle was re-established with a pig pulmonary homograft. After finishing data collection, all animals were executed 1 hour after removal from the CPB. For the 13 minipigs that underwent the operation, the CPB time was 182.4 ± 23.4 min. Two of the thirteen cases died of bleeding during the operation and of a post-operative pulmonary embolism, and the remaining eleven survived for one hour. The pressure of the left atrium did not increase significantly (P = 1.00), and the ultrasonic cardiograph (UCG) showed good function of the new mitral valves, with mean ejection fraction (EF) values of 63.6%. The mitral valve orifice areas were 1.10 ± 0.13 cm2 (pre-operation) and 1.01 ± 0.08 cm2 (post-operation) (P = 0.013). The function and structure of the new mitral valves were normal. We preliminarily consider scaffold-pulmonary autograft valve transplantation to be a new alternative to cure mitral valve disease, but advanced chronic animal experiments will be needed to confirm the long-term results of the operation. The results showed it could be a new alternative to cure mitral valve disease.


Xu X.-F.,Capital Medical University | Guo H.-P.,First Hospital of Handan | Gong D.,Capital Medical University | Ma J.-H.,Chest Hospital of Henan Province | And 6 more authors.
International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine | Year: 2013

The physical properties of the tissues are weakened after decellularization, and the exposed collagen fibers are prone to thrombogenesis. Several studies have proven that the use of carbodiimide (EDC) as a crosslinking agent can improve the properties of decellularized xenogeneic scaffold materials. We adopted EDC for the treatment of porcine pulmonary arteries in an effort to improve the physical properties of these arteries following decellularization. Twenty porcine pulmonary arteries were randomly divided into 3 groups. The control group (group A) consisted of fresh porcine pulmonary arteries with no further processing; group B was treated with trypsin and the detergent Triton X-100 to remove cells; and group C was cross-linked with EDC after trypsin and Triton X-100 treatment, as in group B. The pulmonary arteries were assessed based on water content, thickness, tensile strength, and thermal shrinkage temperature, to evaluate the physical properties of all of the samples. The scaffolds were then subcutaneously embedded in rabbits. These constructs were removed after 4 weeks and checked. The cells and matrix components of the arterial walls were removed and the fibrous scaffolds were retained. In group B, the moisture content of the pulmonary arterial walls was increased; and the thickness of the walls and the tensile strength of the pulmonary arteries were decreased in comparison with group A. In subcutaneous embedding of the group B samples in rabbits, after 4 weeks, fibroblasts had grown into the scaffolds and regenerated the tissue. The water content was decreased in the pulmonary arterial walls, there was an increase in the tensile strength and the thermal shrinkage temperature in group C compared with group B. The EDC-based cross-linking procedure can enhance the tensile strength of decellularized pulmonary arteries and decrease scaffold rejection and degradation and promote tissue regeneration in vivo.


Xia L.,Capital Medical University | Zhang M.,Capital Medical University | Qu Y.,Capital Medical University | Ren M.,Capital Medical University | And 5 more authors.
Neurosurgical Review | Year: 2012

In retrosigmoid craniotomy, neurosurgeons usually depend on surface landmarks and their experience to evaluate the position of transverse-sigmoid sinus junction (TSSJ) and place an appropriate initial burr-hole, which is not accurate each time because of variability in different craniums. The authors introduce a simple procedure based on 3D computed tomography (CT) to localize the TSSJ in retrosigmoid craniotomy. Eighteen patients who underwent retrosigmoid craniotomy were analyzed. On the internal view of skull in 3D CT image, a simulative burr-hole was placed on the margin of transverse-sigmoid sinus groove junction. Then, on the external view of skull in 3D CT image, the center of the simulative burr-hole was marked and a coordinate system was established based on a line connected the digastric point and the asterion. Then the coordinate of the burr-hole's center was measured in this coordinate system. In operation, the burr-hole was placed according to the coordinate measured previously and craniotomy was performed. The margin of TSSJ was exposed in each case. No damage of venous sinus was encountered. Post-operative skull base CT demonstrated a good match between the actual and predicted burr-hole and bone defects only existed along the cut line. This simple method could help in localizing the TSSJ and avoiding the risk of sinus injury and reducing the bone defect. It is sufficiently precise for practical application at surgical planning. © Springer-Verlag 2012.

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