Foundation FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology

Milano, Italy

Foundation FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology

Milano, Italy
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Murakami M.,Foundation FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology | Giampietro C.,Foundation FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology | Giannotta M.,Foundation FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology | Corada M.,Foundation FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology | And 11 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Intercellular junctions promote homotypic cell to cell adhesion and transfer intracellular signals which control cell growth and apoptosis. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is a transmembrane immunoglobulin located at tight junctions of normal epithelial cells of mammary ducts and glands. In the present paper we show that JAM-A acts as a survival factor for mammary carcinoma cells. JAM-A null mice expressing Polyoma Middle T under MMTV promoter develop significantly smaller mammary tumors than JAM-A positive mice. Angiogenesis and inflammatory or immune infiltrate were not statistically modified in absence of JAM-A but tumor cell apoptosis was significantly increased. Tumor cells isolated from JAM-A null mice or 4T1 cells incubated with JAM-A blocking antibodies showed reduced growth and increased apoptosis which paralleled altered junctional architecture and adhesive function. In a breast cancer clinical data set, tissue microarray data show that JAM-A expression correlates with poor prognosis. Gene expression analysis of mouse tumor samples showed a correlation between genes enriched in human G3 tumors and genes over expressed in JAM-A +/+ mammary tumors. Conversely, genes enriched in G1 human tumors correlate with genes overexpressed in JAM-A-/- tumors. We conclude that down regulation of JAM-A reduces tumor aggressive behavior by increasing cell susceptibility to apoptosis. JAM-A may be considered a negative prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target. © 2011 Murakami et al.


Goddard L.M.,University of California at Los Angeles | Murphy T.J.,University of California at Los Angeles | Org T.,University of California at Los Angeles | Enciso J.M.,University of California at Los Angeles | And 13 more authors.
Cell | Year: 2014

Vascular permeability is frequently associated with inflammation and is triggered by a cohort of secreted permeability factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Here, we show that the physiological vascular permeability that precedes implantation is directly controlled by progesterone receptor (PR) and is independent of VEGF. Global or endothelial-specific deletion of PR blocks physiological vascular permeability in the uterus, whereas misexpression of PR in the endothelium of other organs results in ectopic vascular leakage. Integration of an endothelial genome-wide transcriptional profile with chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing revealed that PR induces an NR4A1 (Nur77/TR3)-dependent transcriptional program that broadly regulates vascular permeability in response to progesterone. Silencing of NR4A1 blocks PR-mediated permeability responses, indicating a direct link between PR and NR4A1. This program triggers concurrent suppression of several junctional proteins and leads to an effective, timely, and venous-specific regulation of vascular barrier function that is critical for embryo implantation. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Dejana E.,Foundation FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology | Dejana E.,University of Milan | Orsenigo F.,Foundation FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology
Journal of Cell Science | Year: 2013

Adherens junctions have an important role in the control of vascular permeability. These structures are located at cell-to-cell contacts, mediate cell adhesion and transfer intracellular signals. Adhesion is mediated by cadherins, which interact homophilically in trans and form lateral interactions in cis. VE-cadherin (also known as CDH5 and CD144) is the major component of endothelial adherens junctions and is specific to endothelial cells. Endothelial cells from different types of vessels, such as lymphatic vessels, arteries and veins, show differences in junction composition and organization. Vascular permeability is increased by modifications in the expression and function of adherens junction components. In some cases these defects might be cause of pathology. In this Cell Science at a Glance article, we present the example of the socalled cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), where adherens junctions are dismantled in the vessels contributing to brain microcirculation. This causes the loss of endothelial cell apical-basal polarity and the formation of cavernomas, which are fragile and hemorrhagic. Other diseases are accompanied by persistent alterations of vascular morphology and permeability, such as seen in tumors. It will be important to achieve a better understanding of the relationship between vascular fragility, malformations and junctional integrity in order to develop more effective therapies. © 2013. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.


PubMed | Foundation FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of cell science | Year: 2013

Adherens junctions have an important role in the control of vascular permeability. These structures are located at cell-to-cell contacts, mediate cell adhesion and transfer intracellular signals. Adhesion is mediated by cadherins, which interact homophilically in trans and form lateral interactions in cis. VE-cadherin (also known as CDH5 and CD144) is the major component of endothelial adherens junctions and is specific to endothelial cells. Endothelial cells from different types of vessels, such as lymphatic vessels, arteries and veins, show differences in junction composition and organization. Vascular permeability is increased by modifications in the expression and function of adherens junction components. In some cases these defects might be cause of pathology. In this Cell Science at a Glance article, we present the example of the so-called cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), where adherens junctions are dismantled in the vessels contributing to brain microcirculation. This causes the loss of endothelial cell apical-basal polarity and the formation of cavernomas, which are fragile and hemorrhagic. Other diseases are accompanied by persistent alterations of vascular morphology and permeability, such as seen in tumors. It will be important to achieve a better understanding of the relationship between vascular fragility, malformations and junctional integrity in order to develop more effective therapies.


PubMed | Foundation FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2011

Intercellular junctions promote homotypic cell to cell adhesion and transfer intracellular signals which control cell growth and apoptosis. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is a transmembrane immunoglobulin located at tight junctions of normal epithelial cells of mammary ducts and glands. In the present paper we show that JAM-A acts as a survival factor for mammary carcinoma cells. JAM-A null mice expressing Polyoma Middle T under MMTV promoter develop significantly smaller mammary tumors than JAM-A positive mice. Angiogenesis and inflammatory or immune infiltrate were not statistically modified in absence of JAM-A but tumor cell apoptosis was significantly increased. Tumor cells isolated from JAM-A null mice or 4T1 cells incubated with JAM-A blocking antibodies showed reduced growth and increased apoptosis which paralleled altered junctional architecture and adhesive function. In a breast cancer clinical data set, tissue microarray data show that JAM-A expression correlates with poor prognosis. Gene expression analysis of mouse tumor samples showed a correlation between genes enriched in human G3 tumors and genes over expressed in JAM-A +/+ mammary tumors. Conversely, genes enriched in G1 human tumors correlate with genes overexpressed in JAM-A-/- tumors. We conclude that down regulation of JAM-A reduces tumor aggressive behavior by increasing cell susceptibility to apoptosis. JAM-A may be considered a negative prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target.

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