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News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

MENLO PARK, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--FINsix Corporation (FINsix®), manufacturer of DART®, the world’s smallest laptop charger, today announced DART-C, the world’s smallest charger for USB Type-C laptops. The DART-C furthers the FINsix commitment to providing an unprecedented level of portability for on-the-go consumers and business travelers by enabling them to ditch their bulky bricks and USB chargers. DART-C is a powerful 65-watt laptop charger that is up to four times smaller and lighter than a traditional A/C adapter. The additional built-in USB port allows for simultaneous charging of another electronic device, like a phone or tablet. With the addition of DART-C, the DART family of chargers expands its ample reach of supported laptops to include Apple MacBook and MacBook Pro, Dell XPS 13, Lenovo ThinkPad 13, and ASUS ZenBook 3. “With DART-C, we continue to lighten the load for travelers who want to power up with style and reliability,” said Vanessa Green, FINsix CEO. “The DART family’s newest member demonstrates our ongoing commitment to provide a new class of the smallest and lightest high-performance power electronics to meet the needs of the mobile consumer.” DART-C will be available at FINsix.com and other resellers beginning in January 2017 for a price of $99.99. A USB Type-C cable will also be available at FINsix.com as an accessory to previous DART owners for $34.99. Like the DART launched in September 2016, DART-C comes in a variety of stylish colors, including blue, gunmetal, magenta, orange, and silver. FINsix Corporation, the worldwide leader in high-frequency power conversion technology, is bringing to market highly miniaturized power conversion products that offer unprecedented power density and excellent performance. FINsix is a spinout from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology LEES Laboratory. The company has 34 issued and pending patents and is based in Menlo Park, CA. FINsix’s investors include Cornwall Capital, Venrock Associates, Cranberry Capital, Apple Core Holdings, and Marubun Corporation. For more information, visit www.FINsix.com.


Patent
FINsix Corporation | Date: 2016-09-20

A method and controller for controlling a power converter having a plurality of stacked power cells. A method includes controlling the plurality of stacked power cells using a common mode control parameter as well as a differential mode control parameter that controls a voltage of a connection terminal between respective power cells of the plurality of stacked power cells.


Patent
FINsix Corporation | Date: 2016-09-20

Control techniques and circuits for resonant power converters and other power converters are described. Control of power converters based on more than one control parameter can provide improved efficiency over a wide operating range. A resonant power converter may have its switching frequency controlled within a narrow band to improve efficiency.


Patent
FINsix Corporation | Date: 2014-03-14

A power module includes a housing and an AC/DC converter within the housing. The AC/DC converter is configured to convert an AC input signal into a DC output signal. The power module also includes an actuated heat removal device. The actuated heat removal device is configured to remove heat produced by the AC/DC converter from the housing.


Patent
FINsix Corporation | Date: 2014-03-14

A power conversion module, such as a power adapter, includes a heat removal system such as an active heat removal system, a passive heat removal system or a hybrid heat removal system. A small-size power conversion module having a heat removal system is described.


Patent
FINsix Corporation | Date: 2015-05-13

In an aspect, the present invention provides a high frequency switching power converter. The high frequency switching power converter may include a plurality of soft-switchable power cells flexibly connected to receive an input signal in series and provide an output. The high frequency switching power converter may further include a controller for configuring the flexible connection and for controlling the power cells to receive the input signal. In an embodiment, each of the plurality of power cells may be separately controllable by the controller. Further, a portion of the plurality of power cells may be arranged with parallel outputs. Additionally, at least one of the plurality of cells may include one or more switched capacitors. In another embodiment, the at least one of the plurality of cells may include at least one switched capacitor and a DC/DC regulating converter.


Patent
FINsix Corporation | Date: 2015-03-26

In an aspect, the present invention provides a high frequency switching power converter. The high frequency switching power converter may include a plurality of soft-switchable power cells flexibly connected to receive an input signal in series and provide an output. The high frequency switching power converter may further include a controller for configuring the flexible connection and for controlling the power cells to receive the input signal. In an embodiment, each of the plurality of power cells may be separately controllable by the controller. Further, a portion of the plurality of power cells may be arranged with parallel outputs. Additionally, at least one of the plurality of cells may include one or more switched capacitors. In another embodiment, the at least one of the plurality of cells may include at least one switched capacitor and a DC/DC regulating converter.


News Article | April 14, 2014
Site: techcrunch.com

Many aspects of computing have changed, but the laptop charger has remained sadly stable over the years; no matter what, we never seem to be able to ditch the lumpy power brick, that mid-cable eyesore that takes up tons of space in your bag and presents a ready hazard for stepping on. MIT project turned startup FINsix wants to change all that, and you can help them by reserving your own Dart micro notebook charger on Kickstarter today. The Dart is a tiny 65W laptop adapter, complete with a 2.1 amp USB charger built-in for charging a smartphone or tablet at the same time. The plug isn’t a huge cumbersome affair, however; instead, it’s about the size of two stacked standard iPhone adapters, which makes it about four times smaller and six times lighter than your average notebook brick. FINsix was showing off the Dart prototype at CES this year, and one of the key aspects of its design is that it takes up only a single socket spot in addition to getting rid of that big mid-cord box. It’s compatible with the PCs of every major OEM, and with MacBooks using the Dart for MacBook or Custom Dart backer options. The Dart for MacBook will cost backers an additional $79 it’s worth noting, but that’s because FINsix has to buy an actual MacBook adapter for each one it builds at full retail price. Also, users of 15- or 17-inch MacBook notebooks are out of luck, since they require more than 65W power capacity, the max currently offered by Dart. The tech used to build the Dart works by using some new techniques to miniaturize power conversion using very high frequency methods that have been made more portable and more cost-effective. FINsix’s MIT-made tech can cycle 1000x faster with only the same energy loss as existing power converters, making it far more efficient to pack the converter into a much smaller space. The Dart is also supposed to run cool (some power bricks double as space heaters or hot plates, and comes with a one year warranty and sells for just $79 on Kickstarter, which is around $40 cheaper than the final expected retail price when the Dart goes to market after it ships to backers in November of this year.


News Article | January 27, 2015
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Since 1990, the number of women entering careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, or commonly known as STEM, has basically remained stagnant. Today, women make up half of the workforce, attain more college degrees than men, and earn at least half of their family’s income. Technology-related careers are one of the fastest-growing and highest-paying paths and women in STEM jobs earn 33% more than those in non-STEM jobs and enjoy a smaller income gap relative to men, yet companies still can’t quite figure out how to attract and retain more talented women in STEM. Even when companies are able to attract women, there’s a huge problem retaining them. According to a Harvard Business Review special report led by economist Sylvia Ann Hewlett, 41% of "highly qualified scientists, engineers, and technologists on the lower rungs of corporate career ladders" are female, yet more than 54% if them drop out between their mid-to-late-thirties. The report says that at this point in their lives, women in STEM careers begin letting go of their aspirations of becoming part of the leadership team, because they don’t want to sacrifice everything else in their lives to get there. It’s actually very simple and all comes down to the balance between work and personal lives. "When searching for a company, many women may not consider potential employers who don’t have [family] initiatives in place," says Emily Cole, the chief science officer at Liquid Light, a startup aimed at developing the science behind a practical and economic way to turn carbon dioxide into commonly used chemicals. 41% of highly qualified scientists, engineers, and technologists on the lower rungs of corporate career ladders are female, yet more than 54% if them drop out between their mid-to-late-thirties. "The challenge of balancing dual careers within a relationship is common in my field. It has been not only an obstacle in my life, but I see it all around me," she continues. "It is difficult for two people to align their careers when you have to account for such factors as location of opportunities, travel schedules, work hours, and more. Opportunities in the science world are not as widespread and mobile as other careers, adding another challenge." Cole, who was recently named an Innovator Under 35 by MIT Technology Review, belives the exodus of women in STEM in their thirties may have a lot to do with women sacrificing for their families, mainly because of typical gender roles and companies not having adequate family initiatives in place. This is a major mistake on the company’s part. Scientists and engineers often have to solve complex problems and the more diversity they have on their team, the greater the chances of finding innovative solutions that may have been overlooked at one time. Yet companies are having a hard time thinking this way. Vanessa Green, CEO and cofounder of FINsix Corporation, which designs and manufactures advanced power electronic systems, also believes that key family policies for men and women are essential when it comes to balance so workers don’t feel like they have to choose one or the other. Green, who started her company in 2010 with a team of MIT graduate students, tells Fast Company it’s crucial that policies extend to male talent since even when there are great maternity policies, this "still puts a lot of the pressure on females to be doing it all," and women need the support to focus on their careers. For those who are interested in STEM careers, but are uncertain about the challenges, Cole reminds these women that "gender roles and stigmas should never impact a person’s decisions." "Women who are passionate about STEM should follow their instincts and pursue careers within the different fields," she says. "Everyone will face hurdles in their careers, no matter what industry they are working in. Passion is what keeps you focused on your goals and in return leads to your success. The more we see women excel in STEM and leading companies, the more other women will be inspired to follow in their footsteps." And the more women there are in these industries, the more difficult it will be for companies to ignore them.

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