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Kuopio, Finland

Hakalehto E.,University of Eastern Finland | Heitto A.,Finnoflag Oy | Heitto L.,Environmental Research of Savo Karjala Oy
Pathophysiology | Year: 2013

Laboratory strains of coliforms Escherichia coli and Klebsiella mobilis were used to artificially contaminate water samples in two different cultivation and detection systems, without and with bubble flow. Samples were collected with an automated system (ASCS). The positive coliform signal caused the color change into yellow (at 550-570. nm). This signal could also be transmitted on-line to cell phones. E. coli containing samples emitted UV fluorescence at 480-560. nm when activated by UV light. If cultivation was started with inocula varying from 10,000 to 1. cfu/ml, the positive detection was obtained between 2 and 18. h, respectively, in Colilert medium using Coline PMEU device without gas bubbling. Accordingly, a single K. mobilis cell produced detectable growth in 18. h. Various clinical E. coli strains were compared to each other with equal inoculum sizes, and they showed slight variations in the initiation and speed of growth. The gas bubble flow in PMEU Spectrion promoted the mixing and interaction of bacteria and indicator media and speeded the onset of growth. Carbon dioxide also accelerated bacterial growth. In the presence of vancomycin, the onset of E. coli culture growth was speeded up by the volatile outlet flow from previous cultures. In the last cultivation syringe in a series of five, the lag phase disappeared and the growth of the inoculum continued without major interruption. In conclusion: the stimulation of the cultures by the gas flow turned out to be a useful means for improving the detection of indicator bacteria. It could also be used in combination with antibiotic selection in the broth medium. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Source


Hakalehto E.,University of Eastern Finland | Nyholm O.,Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare | Bonkoungou I.J.O.,Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare | Bonkoungou I.J.O.,University of Ouagadougou | And 6 more authors.
Pathophysiology | Year: 2014

Field-adaptable research methods for identifying Campylobacter sp., Yersinia sp. and other pathogenic and indicator bacteria were designed in Finland and tested in Burkina Faso. Several bacterial groups were also validated from artificially contaminated samples. Campylobacter strains were cultivated using an innovative gas generation system: The 'Portable Microbe Enrichment Unit' (PMEU) which provides microaerobic gas flow into the enrichment broth. This enhanced cultivation system produced rapid growth of several isolates of campylobacteria from water and chicken samples. The latter were obtained from local marketplace samples. No yersinias were found in the field studies, whereas they were readily recovered from the spiked samples, as well as Salmonella sp. and Escherichia coli strains. The PMEU method turned out to be reliable for monitoring of water and food hygiene in remote locations. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Hakalehto E.,University of Eastern Finland | Heitto A.,Finnoflag Oy | Heitto L.,Environmental Research of Savo Karjala | Rissanen K.,Finnoflag Oy | And 3 more authors.
Pathophysiology | Year: 2014

The use of PMEU significantly accelerated the growth of otherwise slowly growing Mycobacterium sp. Compared to the static reference cultures, M. marinum was detected after 24-48h of cultivation in the PMEU Spectrion® equipped with infrared (IR) sensors. Parallel static cultures did not exhibit or indicate mycobacterial growth within these time limits, and essentially no growth was found in them. The PMEU approach could provide a powerful tool for the rapid diagnosis and determination of environmental and clinical isolates of slow-growing species of mycobacteria. This approach also provides a method for improving diagnostics for M. tuberculosis and other pathogenic mycobacteria, including their antibiotic resistant forms, which represents a significant health problem worldwide and in Africa in particular. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Source


Hakalehto E.,University of Eastern Finland | Hell M.,Universitatsklinikum Salzburg | Bernhofer C.,Universitatsklinikum Salzburg | Heitto A.,Finnoflag Oy | And 4 more authors.
Pathophysiology | Year: 2010

Simultaneous cultivations in anaerobiosis, aerobiosis and with microaerobic gas mixture were used to clarify the bile (oxgall) effects on the pure and mixed cultures of enterobacterial strains in simulations in Portable Microbe Enrichment Unit (PMEU) linked with ChemPro100i® gas detector. The effects of vancomycin were evaluated in aerobic cultures. Growth and metabolic activity of cultures were also followed by measuring sugar consumption, pH alterations, and colony counts on BD CHROMagar™ Orientation plates. Results showed that the two fermentatively different strains of facultative anaerobes, Escherichia coli E 17 and Klebsiella mobilis ATCC 13048 grew in balance regardless of oxygen level, bile acid concentration or other components of the mixed cultures, Bacillus cereus or Staphylococcus aureus. When the evaporations of the mixed cultures of E. coli, K. mobilis and S. aureus were compared with the emissions of the corresponding pure cultures by ChemPro100i® gas sensing detector, the pure cultures of bile resistant E. coli and K. mobilis produced more gaseous components than the mixed culture indicating that these organisms cooperate and use the substrate more effectively together than separately. A survey of the aseptic bacterial isolations from the bile tract in a big University Hospital, (Salzburg, Austria) during 3 years, showed that these bacterial groups dominated. Only 13.24% of the 287 patient samples were sterile, and around 180 strains of both E. coli and Klebsiella/Enterobacter groups were found amongst 973 isolates from 249 patients (together 35.57%). Enterococcus sp. accounted for 246 isolates being the largest group of strains (24.25% of all the isolates). In anaerobiosis it was shown that Klebsiella neutralized the acids produced in the mixed acid fermentation of the E. coli. The ethanol produced from both groups evaporated in the gas stream of the PMEU culturing step and its formation also removes excess acidity from the cultures. The synergistic behaviour and symbiotic function between E. coli and Klebsiella/Enterobacter strains is suggested. © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Trademark
Finnoflag Oy | Date: 2016-03-08

Waste disposers, namely, food waste disposers and garbage disposals, machines tools for removing waste and trash; Treatment machines for wastes and biomasses, namely, waste and trash separator machines, machines tools for removing waste and trash, waste compacting machines, waste crushing machines; Machines for the production of chemicals, energy products and soil improvement agents. Scientific and technological services, namely research, analysis and testing in the fields of bacteriology, microbe diagnostics, water distribution, water treatment, waste management, forestry and agriculture; Industrial analysis and research services, namely analysis of industrial fluids, analysis of industrial waste water, chemical research of industrial fluids, analysis and research of methods used in water distribution, water treatment, waste management, forestry and agriculture; Industrial research and development in the fields of microbiological and biochemical processes, upstream and downstream processing, and ecological sustainability; Monitoring of computer systems by remote access to ensure proper functioning; Electronic monitoring of microbiological and biochemical processes, upstream and downstream processing, and ecological sustainability using computers and sensors electronic data collection; Research in the fields of physics and biophysics, consulting in the fields of physics and biophysics; Quality control for others; Technical research in the fields of bacteriology, microbe diagnostics, water distribution, water treatment, waste management, forestry, agriculture; Technical project studies, namely conducting scientific feasibility studies.

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