Finnish Registry for Kidney Diseases

Helsinki, Finland

Finnish Registry for Kidney Diseases

Helsinki, Finland
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Carrero J.J.,Karolinska Institutet | de Jager D.J.,Leiden University | Verduijn M.,Leiden University | Ravani P.,University of Calgary | And 10 more authors.
Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology | Year: 2011

Background and objectives Although women have a survival advantage in the general population, women on dialysis have similar mortality to men. We hypothesized that this paired mortality risk during dialysis may be explained by a relative excess of cardiovascular-related mortality in women. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We compared 5-year age-stratified cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality rates, relative risks, and hazard ratios in a European cohort of incident adult dialysis patients (European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association [ERA-EDTA] Registry) with the European general population (Eurostat). Cause of death was recorded by ERA-EDTA codes in dialysis patients and by International Statistical Classification of Diseases codes in the general population. Results Overall, sex did not have a predictive effect on outcome in dialysis. Stratification into age categories and causes of death showed greater noncardiovascular mortality in young women (<45 years). In other age categories (45 to 55 and >55 years), women presented lower cardiovascular mortality. This cardiovascular benefit was, however, smaller than in the general population. Stratification by diabetic nephropathy showed that diabetic women in all age categories remained at increased mortality risk compared with men, an effect mainly attributed to the noncardiovascular component. Conclusions Mortality rates and causes of death in men and women on dialysis vary with age. Increased noncardiovascular mortality may explain the loss of the survival advantage of women on dialysis. Both young and diabetic women starting dialysis are at a higher mortality risk than equal men. © 2011 by the American Society of Nephrology.


Ocak G.,Leiden University | Van Stralen K.J.,University of Amsterdam | Rosendaal F.R.,Leiden University | Verduijn M.,Leiden University | And 11 more authors.
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis | Year: 2012

Background: It is has been suggested that dialysis patients have lower mortality rates for pulmonary embolism than the general population, because of platelet dysfunction and bleeding tendency. However, there is limited information whether dialysis is indeed associated with a decreased mortality risk from pulmonary embolism. Objective:The aim of our study was to evaluate whether mortality rate ratios for pulmonary embolism were lower than for myocardial infarction and stroke in dialysis patients compared with the general population. Methods: Cardiovascular causes of death for 130439 incident dialysis patients registered in the ERA-EDTA Registry were compared with the cardiovascular causes of death for the European general population. Results: The age- and sex-standardized mortality rate (SMR) from pulmonary embolism was 12.2 (95% CI 10.2-14.6) times higher in dialysis patients than in the general population. The SMRs in dialysis patients compared with the general population were 11.0 (95% CI 10.6-11.4) for myocardial infarction, 8.4 (95% CI 8.0-8.8) for stroke, and 8.3 (95% CI 8.0-8.5) for other cardiovascular diseases. In dialysis patients, primary kidney disease due to diabetes was associated with an increased mortality risk due to pulmonary embolism (HR 1.9; 95% CI 1.0-3.8), myocardial infarction (HR 4.1; 95% CI 3.4-4.9), stroke (HR 3.5; 95% CI 2.8-4.4), and other cardiovascular causes of death (HR 3.4; 95% CI 2.9-3.9) compared with patients with polycystic kidney disease. Conclusions: Dialysis patients were found to have an unexpected highly increased mortality rate for pulmonary embolism and increased mortality rates for myocardial infarction and stroke. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.


Immonen K.,North Karelia Central Hospital | Finne P.,Finnish Registry for Kidney Diseases | Gronhagen-Riska C.,University of Helsinki | Pettersson T.,University of Helsinki | And 5 more authors.
Amyloid | Year: 2011

Risk for amyloidosis in rheumatic diseases is associated with a long-lasting inflammation. To assess possible changes in the incidence of terminal uraemia due to amyloidosis associated with rheumatic diseases on a nationwide basis, we scrutinised the files of the Finnish Registry for Kidney Diseases for patients suffering from amyloidosis associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) over the period 1995-2008. The registry has an estimated 97-99% coverage of all patients accepted for renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the country. Data on the consumption of antirheumatic drugs were collected from two sources: the Social Insurance Institution's Drug Reimbursement Register, and the Sales Register of the National Agency for Medicines from the above period. Altogether 264 cases were identified. Two hundred twenty-nine of them had RA, 15 AS and 20 JIA. When the total annual number of new admissions to RRT varied between 20 and 37 at the end of 1990s, it was under half of that from 2002 onwards. Over this period, the number of users of low-dose methotrexate (MTX) has increased 3.6-fold, the drug being the most frequently used disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug in Finland. The present nationwide series is the first to show that the incidence of end-stage renal disease due to amyloidosis associated with rheumatic diseases is decreasing. An obvious reason for this is intensive anti-rheumatic drug therapy. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.


PubMed | University of Amsterdam, University of Calgary, Nefrovisie RENINE, SICATA The Information System of the Andalusian Transplant Autonomic Coordination Registry andalusia and 13 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association | Year: 2016

Although previous studies suggest similar patient survival for peritoneal dialysis (PD) and haemodialysis (HD), PD use has decreased worldwide. We aimed to study trends in the choice of first dialysis modality and relate these to variation in patient and technique survival and kidney transplant rates in Europe over the last 20 years.We used data from 196 076 patients within the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) Registry who started renal replacement therapy (RRT) between 1993 and 2012. Trends in the incidence rate and prevalence on Day 91 after commencing RRT were quantified with Joinpoint regression. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for 5-year dialysis patient and technique survival were calculated using Cox regression. Analyses were repeated using propensity score matching to control for confounding by indication.PD prevalence dropped since 2007 and HD prevalence stabilized since 2009. Incidence rates of PD and HD decreased from 2000 and 2009, respectively, while the incidence of kidney transplantation increased from 1993 onwards. Similar 5-year patient survival for PD versus HD patients was found in 1993-97 [adjusted HR: 1.02, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.98-1.06], while survival was higher for PD patients in 2003-07 (HR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.88-0.95). Both PD (HR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.91-1.00) and HD technique survival (HR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.87-0.99) improved in 2003-07 compared with 1993-97.Although initiating RRT on PD was associated with favourable patient survival when compared with starting on HD treatment, PD was often not selected as initial dialysis modality. Over time, we observed a significant decline in PD use and a stabilization in HD use. These observations were explained by the lower incidence rate of PD and HD and the increase in pre-emptive transplantation.


Stel V.S.,University of Amsterdam | Tomson C.,Southmead Hospital | Ansell D.,Southmead Hospital | Casino F.G.,Ospedale Madonna Delle Grazie | And 9 more authors.
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation | Year: 2010

Background. The aims of this European study were (i) to compare the level of renal function at the start of dialysis between age groups, gender, primary renal disease, comorbid conditions, treatment modality, time periods and countries, and (ii) to determine which baseline characteristics are associated with the level of renal function at the start of dialysis.Methods. Renal registries participating in the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry provided data on serum creatinine 0-4 weeks before the start of dialysis in incident dialysis patients in 1999 and 2003. Data were available in 11 472 patients from nine renal registries. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated by the four-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Results. The unadjusted median eGFR at the start of dialysis was 7.0 mL/min/1.73 m2 in the 1999 data (median serum creatinine 7.5 mg/dL) and 7.7 mL/min/1.73 m2 in the 2003 data (serum creatinine 7.0 mg/dL). Using linear regression with adjustment for the other covariates, older patients, males, patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension/renal vascular disease (HT/RVD) as primary renal disease (vs glomerulonephritis), ischaemic heart disease or peripheral vascular disease and patients starting on peritoneal dialysis (PD) initiated dialysis at higher levels of eGFR (range Δ eGFR: 0.1-1.2 mL/min/1.73 m2). Using the same analyses, eGFR differed between countries (range: 6.5-8.6 mL/min/1.73 m2). Conclusions. During 2003, patients started dialysis at somewhat higher eGFR levels than those starting during 1999. There were also international differences in eGFR. Such differences may, at least in part, be explained by differences in creatinine measurement methods between countries and time periods. Finally, older patients, males, patients with HT/RVD or comorbidity and those starting on PD had slightly higher eGFR levels than younger patients, females, those with glomerulonephritis, without comorbidity and those starting on haemodialysis. Further research is needed into other, more clinically related factors affecting the decision to start dialysis. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.


Tsakiris D.J.,General Hospital Papageorgiou of Thessaloniki | Stel V.S.,University of Amsterdam | Finne P.,Finnish Registry for Kidney Diseases | Fraser E.,Royal Infirmary | And 6 more authors.
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation | Year: 2010

Background. Information on demographics and survival of patients starting renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to multiple myeloma (MM) or light-chain deposit disease (LCDD) is scarce. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, characteristics, causes of death and survival rates of RRT for ESRD due to MM or LCDD in the ERA-EDTA Registry.Methods. Thirteen national registries providing data on patients who started RRT from 1986-2005 to the ERA-EDTA Registry participated. Incidence per million population (pmp) of RRT for ESRD due to MM or LCDD and other causes (non-MM) was observed overtime. Patient survival on RRT was examined, unadjusted and adjusted for age and gender.Results. Of the 159 637 patients on RRT, 2453 (1.54%) had MM or LCDD. The incidence of RRT for ESRD due to MM or LCDD, adjusted for age and gender, increased from 0.70 pmp in 1986-1990 to 2.52 pmp in 2001-2005. MM and LCDD patients compared to non-MM patients were older and a higher percentage was on haemodialysis at day 91 after the start of RRT. The most common causes of death in MM and LCDD patients were malignancy (36.1%), cardiovascular causes (17.2%) and infection (14.7%). MM and LCDD patients had a 2.77 (95% CI, 2.65-2.90) higher risk of death compared to non-MM patients. The unadjusted median survival on RRT was 0.91 years in MM and LCDD patients and 4.46 years in non-MM patients. During follow-up, 35 patients were transplanted and their mean survival was 9.6 years.Conclusion. The incidence of RRT for ESRD due to MM or LCDD has increased over the past 20 years in Europe. The median patient survival on RRT for MM and LCDD patients was 0.91 years, compared to 4.46 years for non-MM patients. These results suggest that dialysis, and in selected cases even transplantation, should be offered to MM and LCDD patients. © 2009 The Author.


Koopman J.J.E.,Leiden University | Koopman J.J.E.,Vitality | Rozing M.P.,Leiden University | Kramer A.,University of Amsterdam | And 13 more authors.
Aging Cell | Year: 2011

The most frequently used model to describe the exponential increase in mortality rate over age is the Gompertz equation. Logarithmically transformed, the equation conforms to a straight line, of which the slope has been interpreted as the rate of senescence. Earlier, we proposed the derivative function of the Gompertz equation as a superior descriptor of senescence rate. Here, we tested both measures of the rate of senescence in a population of patients with end-stage renal disease. It is clinical dogma that patients on dialysis experience accelerated senescence, whereas those with a functional kidney transplant have mortality rates comparable to the general population. Therefore, we calculated the age-specific mortality rates for European patients on dialysis (n=274221; follow-up=594767 person-years), for European patients with a functioning kidney transplant (n=61286; follow-up=345024 person-years), and for the general European population. We found higher mortality rates, but a smaller slope of logarithmic mortality curve for patients on dialysis compared with both patients with a functioning kidney transplant and the general population (P<0.001). A classical interpretation of the Gompertz model would imply that the rate of senescence in patients on dialysis is lower than in patients with a functioning transplant and lower than in the general population. In contrast, the derivative function of the Gompertz equation yielded the highest senescence rates for patients on dialysis, whereas the rate was similar in patients with a functioning transplant and the general population. We conclude that the rate of senescence is better described by the derivative function of the Gompertz equation. © 2010 The Authors. Aging Cell © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.


Helve J.,Finnish Registry for Kidney Diseases | Haapio M.,University of Helsinki | Groop P.-H.,University of Helsinki | Groop P.-H.,Folkhalsan Institute of Genetics | And 4 more authors.
Diabetologia | Year: 2011

Aims/hypothesis: Comorbidities are frequent among type 1 diabetes patients on renal replacement therapy, yet the effect of comorbidities on survival is unknown. Our aim was to estimate this effect. Methods: An incident cohort of all patients with type 1 diabetes entering chronic renal replacement therapy (n = 656) in Finland between 2000 and 2008 was followed until death or the end of follow-up on 31 December 2008. All data were obtained from the Finnish Registry for Kidney Diseases, which collects information on comorbidities at the start of renal replacement therapy. The main outcome measure was relative risk of death according to comorbidities. Results: At start of renal replacement therapy, 22% of the patients with type 1 diabetes had coronary artery disease, 19% peripheral vascular disease, 11% cerebrovascular disease, 33% left ventricular hypertrophy and 7% heart failure. All these comorbidities were significant predictors of death in univariate analyses (RR 1.6-4.9). The 5 year survival probability of patients without comorbidities was 74%, while it was 56% and 37%, respectively, for those with one or more than one comorbidity. When the comorbidities were studied in a multivariate model, adjusting for age and sex, peripheral vascular disease (RR 1.9), left ventricular hypertrophy (RR 1.7) and heart failure (RR 2.5) remained independent risk factors for death. Calculations indicated that one-third of deaths in the study population could be attributed to comorbidities. Conclusions/interpretation: Among patients with type 1 diabetes entering renal replacement therapy, comorbidities are common and strong predictors of death. Therefore, it is essential to identify and adequately treat comorbidities. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


Haapio M.,University of Helsinki | Helve J.,University of Helsinki | Groop P.-H.,University of Helsinki | Gronhagen-Riska C.,University of Helsinki | And 2 more authors.
Diabetes Care | Year: 2010

OBJECTIVE - Risks of end-stage renal disease and premature death in patients with type 1 diabetes have declined over the past decades. Data on the survival of patients receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT) are, however, limited. We investigated whether survival of patients with type 1 diabetes receiving RRT has improved over time and whether improvement can be attributable to progress in dialysis treatment or diabetes care. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - An incident cohort of all patients with type 1 diabetes (n = 1,604) starting chronic RRT in Finland between 1980 and 2005 were followed until death or end of follow-up on 31 December 2007. The control group (n = 1,556) consisted of patients with glomerulonephritis who started RRT. All patients were identified from the Finnish Registry for Kidney Diseases. RESULTS - Median survival time of patients with type 1 diabetes increased progressively from 3.60 years during 1980-1984 to >8 years in 2000-2005. In 2000-2005, the unadjusted relative risk of death was 0.55 compared with 1980-1984. After adjustment for the most important variables, the corresponding relative risk of death was only 0.23. For patients with glomerulonephritis, the adjusted relative risk decreased to a lesser extent to 0.30 (P = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS - Survival of patients with type 1 diabetes and end-stage renal disease has improved since the 1980s despite a conspicuous increase in the age of patients who start RRT, suggesting not only true progress in dialysis therapy and overall treatment of patients with end-stage renal disease but possibly also improved management of diabetes. © 2010 by the American Diabetes Association.


Kervinen M.,Kuopio University Hospital | Lehto S.,Kuopio University Hospital | Gronhagen-Riska C.,Finnish Registry for Kidney Diseases | Gronhagen-Riska C.,University of Helsinki | And 2 more authors.
American Journal of Nephrology | Year: 2012

Background: Atherosclerosis is an important predictor of mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease. The aim of this study was to determine how various vascular comorbidities such as coronary heart disease (CHD), peripheral vascular disease (PVD) or cerebrovascular disease (CeVD) affect survival of type 2 diabetic patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT). Methods: Patients who entered RRT because of type 2 diabetes in 2000-2008 (n = 877) were identified within the Finnish Registry for Kidney Diseases. The patients were followed up until death or end of follow-up. Survival probabilities were calculated using Kaplan-Meier curves. Multivariate modeling was performed using Cox regression. Results: 41% of the patients had CHD, 27% PVD and 16% CeVD at the start of RRT. Patients with PVD had a 1.9-fold (95% CI 1.6-2.3) risk of death compared to those without PVD when adjusting for age and gender, while patients with CHD had a 1.5-fold (95% CI 1.2-1.8) and those with CeVD a 1.4-fold (95% CI 1.1-1.8) risk compared to those without these diseases. The hazard ratio (HR) for death was highest in patients with the combination of PVD and either CHD (HR 2.8, 95% CI 2.1-3.8) or CeVD (HR 2.9, 95% CI 1.6-5.2) as compared to patients without any vascular comorbidities. Conclusion: PVD is the vascular comorbidity that increases risk of death the most among patients with type 2 diabetes starting RRT. Prevention of PVD in this patient group would merit further studies. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

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