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Socorro, Colombia

Inthapanya S.,Souphanouvong University | Preston T.R.,Finca Ecologica | Leng R.A.,University of New England of Australia
Livestock Research for Rural Development | Year: 2011

An in vitro incubation system was used to evaluate the following treatments in a completely randomized 2*2 factorial arrangement with 4 replications; Cassava leaf meal plus urea (CLM-U), Cassava leaf meal plus calcium nitrate (CLM-CaN), Mimosa pigra leaf meal plus urea (MLM-U) and Mimosa leaf meal plus calcium nitrate (MLM-CaN). The basal substrate was cassava root meal. Gas production did not differ between calcium nitrate and urea but was higher for mimosa than for cassava leaf meal after 48 hours of fermentation. The percentage of methane in the gas was lower for calcium nitrate than for urea at all incubation times but the degree of difference decreased with the length of the incubation. There were no consistent differences between the the cassava and mimosa leaf meals in the methane content of the gas. The proportion of the substrate DM that was fermented in 48h did not differ between sources of NPN nor between the two leaf meals. Overall, the production of methane per unit of substrate fermented was decreased by 32% when calcium nitrate replaced by urea as the NPN source. Source


Phuong L.T.B.,Nong Lam University | Preston T.R.,Finca Ecologica | Leng R.A.,University of New England of Australia
Livestock Research for Rural Development | Year: 2011

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of replacing urea by calcium nitrate with or without supplementary sulfur (0, 0.4, 0.8% on DM basis) on methane production in an in vitro incubation medium inoculated with rumen fluid and using sugar cane stalk and cassava leaf meal as substrate. The design was a 3*2 factorial arrangement of the treatments with 4 replications. Compared with urea, calcium nitrate reduced methane production The effect was consistent over successive periods in the 48h incubation. Adding 0.4% sulfur, in the form of sodium sulphate, increased methane production, while 0.8% sulphur reduced methane production. When 0.8% sulfur was combined with nitrate the effects on methane reduction were additive. Methane production increased linearly with the length of the incubation on all treatments. Source


Thanh V.D.,Can Tho University | Preston T.R.,Finca Ecologica | Leng R.A.,University of New England of Australia
Livestock Research for Rural Development | Year: 2011

An in vitro incubation was used to evaluate effects of Mangosteen peel extract with calcium nitrate or urea on methane production from a substrate of molasses and cassava leaf meal. The design was a 2 by 2 factorial arrangement in a completely random block design with four replications. Calcium nitrate as replacement for urea, and addition of Mangosteen extract, lowered methane production during the final phase (32 to 48h) of the incubation. Estimates of effects over the entire incubation period, based partially on results from similar experiments in the literature, support the effect of calcium nitrate in lowering methane production. The apparently beneficial effect of Mangosteen peel extract in reducing methane production needs to be substantiated by further research. Source


Thanh V.D.,Can Tho University | van Thu N.,Can Tho University | Preston T.R.,Finca Ecologica
Livestock Research for Rural Development | Year: 2012

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the level of Mangosteen peel and potassium nitrate or urea as non-protein nitrogen source on methane production in an in vitro incubation. The design wasa 3*4 factorial with 3 replicates. The factors were source of non protein nitrogen: urea (1.83% of substrate, DM basis) and potassium nitrate (4 or 6% of substrate, DM basis); and levels of Mangosteen peel (0, 0.5, 1 and 1.5% of substrate DM basis). The quantity of substrate was 2.5g to which were added 200ml of buffer solution and 50ml of buffalo rumen fluid taken immediately after the animal was killed in the slaughter-house. The incubation was for 48 h with measurements of gas and methane production at 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h. The proportion of substrate solubilized at 48h was determined by filtration, followed by measurement of ammonia-nitrogen concentration in the filtrate. After 48h incubation, gas and methane production, per cent substrate DM digested and methane produced per unit DM digested, were lower when potassium nitrate was the NPN source compared with urea. The 6% level of potassium nitrate was more effective in reducing methane production than the 4% level. Gas and methane production increased with time of incubation. Similar reductions in the above parameters were observed with increasing level of Mangosteen peel in the substrate. The ammonia concentration in the filtrate after 48h of incubation was lower when potassium nitrate was the NPN source compared with urea. Source


Southavong S.,Champasack University | Preston T.R.,Finca Ecologica | van Man N.,Nong Lam University
Livestock Research for Rural Development | Year: 2012

The hypothesis that was tested in the present study was that there would be a synergistic response in growth of water spinach when biodigester effluent with staggered application was combined with biochar derived from rice husk in an updraft TLUD stove. The experiment was carried out at the research centre of Champasack University, Lao PDR to measure changes in soil fertility as a function of the growth of water spinach plants over a 28 day period following seeding. A completely randomized design was used with 3 replications offifteen treatments in a 3*5 factorial arrangement. The factors were: soil amender (biochar or charcoal or none) at 40 tonnes/ha and level of effluent (0, 25, 50, 75 or 100 kg N/ha). The treatments were applied to samples of soil held in fifteen litre capacity plastic baskets. Effluent was applied at 7 day intervals (total 4 times) and the application was staggered with 10, 20, 30 and 40% respectively at each successive application. Green biomass yield of the water spinach was increased by biochar but not by charcoal. Theapplication of biodigester effluent increased linearly the green biomass yield of the water spinach. Soil pH and water-holding capacity was increased by biochar but was not affected by level of effluent. Source

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