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Santa Barbara, CA, United States

Fielding Graduate University, previously Fielding Graduate Institute, and The Fielding Institute, is an accredited, nonprofit post-graduate distance education institution headquartered in Santa Barbara, California, USA. Fielding Graduate University was founded in March, 1974, in Santa Barbara, California, the realization of the vision of three founders: Frederic M. Hudson, Hallock Hoffman, and Renata Tesch. They designed Fielding as a graduate program for mid-career professionals that were not being served by traditional universities. The university's learning model is geared toward adult professionals seeking master's and doctoral degrees. The university offers accredited degree and certificate programs through three schools: Psychology, Human & Organization Development, and Educational Leadership & Change. Based on the concept of distributed learning, the programs utilize distance learning via an on-line campus; individual faculty-student mentoring and assessment; and face-to-face events of various types, in many locations, and throughout the year.The professions targeted include clinical psychology, media psychology, higher education leadership, healthcare, organizational management, human development, and leadership within the corporate, nonprofit, and public sectors. Fielding is known for having an APA accredited Ph.D program in Clinical Psychology and for being the home of the first Ph.D program in Media Psychology in any university. It is notable that all PhD Programs at Fielding Graduate University have a integrative online learning center operated by Expert Faculty and Staff. Wikipedia.


Mather B.A.,Fielding Graduate University
Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry | Year: 2012

In this article, I integrate research in social construct theory, the medicalization of attentiondeficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and strengths-based theory to propose a change in the way American society negatively labels and interacts with people diagnosed with ADHD. This article presents examples of global perspectives on ADHD, the nature of stigma that occurs to those who receive a medical diagnosis of ADHD, and the need to reframe ADHD from a disease to that of a positive difference. The reader is asked to consider the implications for millions who suffer from the stigma of ADHD. Starting with children diagnosed with ADHD, I suggest that members of society begin to reframe ADHD as a social construct recognizing the strengths and positive traits because there are many. This is a call to all members of society, especially those professionals of the medical, psychological, social, and educational systems, to adopt a strengths-based model of support for those diagnosed with ADHD. © 2012 Springer Publishing Company. Source


Field T.,University of Miami | Field T.,Fielding Graduate University
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice | Year: 2012

This paper is a review of studies published during the last several years on exercise effects on overweight, growth, chronic illnesses, depression and anxiety in children and adolescents. Although the lion's share of the research involves aerobic exercise, studies on yoga and tai chi are also reviewed. Following exercise, body mass index and lipid profiles have improved in overweight children, and those with asthma, diabetes and depression have also benefited from exercise. The yoga studies reviewed here focused on ADHD and anxiety, and the tai chi studies involved children with ADHD and asthma.A potential underlying mechanism for the positive effects of exercise, yoga and tai chi may be the stimulation of pressure receptors leading to increased vagal activity, decreased stress hormones and increased production of anti-pain and antidepressant neurotransmitters such as serotonin. Further studies are needed using convergent behavioral, physiological and biochemical measures. Nonetheless, the current literature highlights the importance of adding exercise programs to clinics, schools and families for the physical and psychological well-being of children and adolescents. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Field T.,University of Miami | Field T.,Fielding Graduate University
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice | Year: 2011

This review briefly summarizes recent Tai Chi research on physical benefits including balance and muscle strength and psychological benefits including attentiveness, sleep and anxiety. Cardiovascular changes following Tai Chi include decreased heart rate and blood pressure, increased vagal activity and decreased cholesterol. Pain syndromes that have been affected include fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Autoimmune and immune conditions recently researched and reviewed here include osteoporosis, diabetes and HIV. Methodological problems with this research include the variability in forms (series of postures) used across studies as well as the intensity of the Tai Chi schedule. Further, most of the studies are based on within group changes rather than attention control group comparisons. Nonetheless, significant clinical improvements have been noted. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Field T.,University of Miami | Field T.,Fielding Graduate University
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice | Year: 2014

Moderate pressure massage has contributed to many positive effects including increased weight gain in preterm infants, reduced pain in different syndromes including fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis, enhanced attentiveness, reduced depression and enhanced immune function (increased natural killer cells and natural killer cell activity).Surprisingly, these recent studies have not been reviewed, highlighting the need for the current review. When moderate and light pressure massage have been compared in laboratory studies, moderate pressure massage reduced depression, anxiety and heart rate, and it altered EEG patterns, as in a relaxation response. Moderate pressure massage has also led to increased vagal activity and decreased cortisol levels. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data have suggested that moderate pressure massage was represented in several brain regions including the amygdala, the hypothalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, all areas involved in stress and emotion regulation. Further research is needed to identify underlying neurophysiological and biochemical mechanisms associated with moderate pressure massage. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Field T.,Fielding Graduate University
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice | Year: 2014

Moderate pressure massage has contributed to many positive effects including increased weight gain in preterm infants, reduced pain in different syndromes including fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis, enhanced attentiveness, reduced depression and enhanced immune function (increased natural killer cells and natural killer cell activity).Surprisingly, these recent studies have not been reviewed, highlighting the need for the current review. When moderate and light pressure massage have been compared in laboratory studies, moderate pressure massage reduced depression, anxiety and heart rate, and it altered EEG patterns, as in a relaxation response. Moderate pressure massage has also led to increased vagal activity and decreased cortisol levels. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data have suggested that moderate pressure massage was represented in several brain regions including the amygdala, the hypothalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, all areas involved in stress and emotion regulation. Further research is needed to identify underlying neurophysiological and biochemical mechanisms associated with moderate pressure massage. © 2014. Source

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