Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Santa Barbara, CA, United States

Fielding Graduate University, previously Fielding Graduate Institute, and The Fielding Institute, is an accredited, nonprofit post-graduate distance education institution headquartered in Santa Barbara, California, USA. Fielding Graduate University was founded in March, 1974, in Santa Barbara, California, the realization of the vision of three founders: Frederic M. Hudson, Hallock Hoffman, and Renata Tesch. They designed Fielding as a graduate program for mid-career professionals that were not being served by traditional universities. The university's learning model is geared toward adult professionals seeking master's and doctoral degrees. The university offers accredited degree and certificate programs through three schools: Psychology, Human & Organization Development, and Educational Leadership & Change. Based on the concept of distributed learning, the programs utilize distance learning via an on-line campus; individual faculty-student mentoring and assessment; and face-to-face events of various types, in many locations, and throughout the year.The professions targeted include clinical psychology, media psychology, higher education leadership, healthcare, organizational management, human development, and leadership within the corporate, nonprofit, and public sectors. Fielding is known for having an APA accredited Ph.D program in Clinical Psychology and for being the home of the first Ph.D program in Media Psychology in any university. It is notable that all PhD Programs at Fielding Graduate University have a integrative online learning center operated by Expert Faculty and Staff. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Mizock L.,Fielding Graduate University
Psychiatric Clinics of North America | Year: 2017

A number of transgender and gender diverse individuals face risks of mental health problems and suicidality, often as a result of transphobia and gender minority stress. There are many resilience and protective factors that transgender individuals use to cope with mental distress and thrive. In this article, a review of the literature on transgender and gender diverse individuals with mental health problems is provided, as well as a discussion of the protective factors that enhance resilience. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


Field T.,University of Miami | Field T.,Fielding Graduate University
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice | Year: 2014

Moderate pressure massage has contributed to many positive effects including increased weight gain in preterm infants, reduced pain in different syndromes including fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis, enhanced attentiveness, reduced depression and enhanced immune function (increased natural killer cells and natural killer cell activity).Surprisingly, these recent studies have not been reviewed, highlighting the need for the current review. When moderate and light pressure massage have been compared in laboratory studies, moderate pressure massage reduced depression, anxiety and heart rate, and it altered EEG patterns, as in a relaxation response. Moderate pressure massage has also led to increased vagal activity and decreased cortisol levels. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data have suggested that moderate pressure massage was represented in several brain regions including the amygdala, the hypothalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, all areas involved in stress and emotion regulation. Further research is needed to identify underlying neurophysiological and biochemical mechanisms associated with moderate pressure massage. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Field T.,Fielding Graduate University
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice | Year: 2014

Moderate pressure massage has contributed to many positive effects including increased weight gain in preterm infants, reduced pain in different syndromes including fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis, enhanced attentiveness, reduced depression and enhanced immune function (increased natural killer cells and natural killer cell activity).Surprisingly, these recent studies have not been reviewed, highlighting the need for the current review. When moderate and light pressure massage have been compared in laboratory studies, moderate pressure massage reduced depression, anxiety and heart rate, and it altered EEG patterns, as in a relaxation response. Moderate pressure massage has also led to increased vagal activity and decreased cortisol levels. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data have suggested that moderate pressure massage was represented in several brain regions including the amygdala, the hypothalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, all areas involved in stress and emotion regulation. Further research is needed to identify underlying neurophysiological and biochemical mechanisms associated with moderate pressure massage. © 2014.


Dill K.E.,Fielding Graduate University
New directions for youth development | Year: 2011

Developmental research on social influences on adolescents can guide practices aimed to prevent homicidal youth violence. School shootings have repeatedly raised questions about the contributory role of bullying and entertainment violence, how news media publicity might produce copycat crimes, and whether stiffer criminal sanctions might have a deterrent effect. This article presents the thoughts and recommendations of a group of experts on these topics summarizing the current knowledge base. In brief, bullying reduction programs may be a useful early prevention effort. Television and video games with violent themes can encourage aggressive behavior, but these media can be used to teach more prosocial behavior as well. The potential copycat effects of highly publicized crimes might be diminished with more restrained reporting, although more research is needed. Finally, there is substantial evidence that increased criminal sanctions for youthful offenders have not had a deterrent effect. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.


Schwabish S.D.,Fielding Graduate University
Journal of Psychosocial Oncology | Year: 2011

Eighty-nine cancer pain patients participated in a study evaluating components of the Cognitive Adaptation Index on symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Positive correlations were found between optimism, mastery, and self-esteem. Inverse relationships with a PTSD symptom scale were also established. Multiple regression analyses for aggregate PTSD scores, avoidance/numbing, and arousal symptoms were each significant at p < 0.0001, intrusive symptoms at p < 0.020. Except for intrusive symptoms, self-esteem played a statistically significant mediating role for the influence of other variables. These results are discussed regarding their impact on PTSD, intervention strategies, and mental health of individuals experiencing stress. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Field T.,University of Miami | Field T.,Fielding Graduate University
Developmental Review | Year: 2010

This review briefly summarizes recent empirical research on touch. The research includes the role of touch in early development, touch deprivation, touch aversion, emotions that can be conveyed by touch, the importance of touch for interpersonal relationships and how friendly touch affects compliance in different situations. MRI data are reviewed showing activation of the orbitofrontal cortex and the caudate cortex during affective touch. Physiological and biochemical effects of touch are also reviewed including decreased heart rate, blood pressure and cortisol and increased oxytocin. Similar changes noted following moderate pressure massage appear to be mediated by the stimulation of pressure receptors and increased vagal activity. Increased serotonin and decreased substance P may explain its pain-alleviating effects. Positive shifts in frontal EEG also accompany moderate pressure massage along with increased attentiveness, decreased depression and enhanced immune function including increased natural killer cells, making massage therapy one of the most effective forms of touch. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 305.90K | Year: 2016

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program has identified evidence-based leadership and professional development of faculty as one of its priorities and is committed to funding innovative models and approaches that will: broaden the full participation of women and underrepresented minorities in STEM, improve STEM education and educator development at any level, and increase the development of a diverse, globally competitive STEM workforce. With support from the National Science Foundation, Fielding Graduate University, in partnership with the Society of STEM Women of Color, Inc., proposes to enhance and implement the STEM Women of Color Conclave as a Broadening Participation Workshop series that will facilitate the preparation of a cadre of its participants for academic leadership roles. GPRA Strategic Management, Inc. (GPRASMi) will serve as the collaborative organizational partner in implementing the proposed Conclave Workshops. This effort will foster a strategic collaboration and provide access to formal postgraduate training in leadership studies. The overall goal of this effort is to increase the representation of STEM women of color in academic leadership positions by enhancing the quality of the leadership development experience. The proposed Conclave Workshops will heighten the profile of STEM women faculty of color who, in turn, will constitute a powerful knowledge network for broadening participation through effective academic leadership. As a long-term outcome, the proposed leadership development experience for women of color is likely to yield a cadre of academic leaders with the acumen needed to address the shifting demands of higher education, and the cultural sensitivity to yield academic success and better STEM career outcomes, particularly among underrepresented minorities. As such, the proposed Workshops will extend beyond the leadership capacity of its participants to the thousands of underrepresented minority students with whom they will interact.

The proposed project will enhance the leadership development experience for women of color who provide the kind of academic and psychosocial support for underrepresented minority students that leads to better STEM learning outcomes by: 1) convening broadening participation workshops focused on leadership development for STEM women of color; and 2) providing access to opportunities to earn continuing education credits as credentials necessary for acquiring legitimacy in and contributing to STEM academic leadership. The specific objectives are: 1) to convene a two-day Broadening Participation Workshop: National Conclave for STEM Women of Color; and 2) to provide access to continuing education (CE) credits for Conclave participants. This project will contribute to redefining higher education leadership to meaningfully include an awareness of, affinity for, and sensitivity to the academic and psychosocial needs of underrepresented minority students, thereby broadening participation. Collectively, these efforts are expected to impact a network of thousands of STEM higher education reformers committed to diversifying STEM faculty, as well as a wider pool of faculty and academic administrators, from all disciplines, who are committed to recruiting and retaining STEM women faculty of color.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 282.41K | Year: 2016

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) has identified evidence-based leadership and professional development of faculty as one of its priorities and is committed to funding innovative models to enhance the understanding of the barriers that hinder and factors that enhance our ability to broaden participation in STEM. With support from the National Science Foundation, the Collaborative for the Advancement of STEM Leadership (CASL) aims to broaden the participation of underrepresented minorities in STEM through a targeted focus on leadership. This collaborative project embraces a more expanded position of creating new knowledge about the relationship between leadership and broadening participation, and transferring that knowledge into institutional practices that can be promulgated through a national community of practice. Initially, the impact of the Collaborative will be among select HBCUs, but, because of its broad reach into mainstream STEM reform communities, these efforts will eventually impact all institutional types and address the growing need for quality leadership for broadening participation in STEM. As a result, tens of thousands of underrepresented minority STEM students, enrolled at both HBCUs and non-HBCU campuses, will experience the kind of academic environments that are most conducive to their learning and persisting as STEM majors.

The goal of CASL is to establish the foundational tenets of the research and practice of leadership for broadening participation in STEM. The Collaborative will achieve this mission through: 1) research activities that will contribute to an increased knowledge base on leadership development for broadening participation in STEM; 2) knowledge translation activities that will use an evidence-based approach to leadership development to increase the number of HBCU leaders with culturally responsive competencies and capacities; and 3) outreach activities that will develop a national Community of Practice to define, codify, and promulgate design principles and practices for broadening participation and thereby increase the visibility/influence of HBCUs at the center of STEM higher education reform. The distributed structure of the Collaborative lends itself to the development and sustainability of an integrated discovery analytical framework that serves two primary purposes: 1) it provides robustness and flexibility in facilitating exploratory and emergent lines of inquiry that directly address research questions about the relationship between leadership and broadening participation in STEM; and 2) it facilitates an iterative and dynamic approach by supporting the integration of new insights and research questions that emerge over the projects duration into the Collaboratives ongoing activities, and vice versa.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: TRIBAL COLLEGE & UNIVERS PROGR | Award Amount: 246.55K | Year: 2016

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology will build upon its existing offerings to develop and deliver a specialized focus in Academic Leadership, designed to address the compelling need for women faculty in the STEM disciplines at HBCUs to acquire leadership skills. The program will serve three cohorts of 15 participants each, each of whom will receive a Graduate Certificate in Academic Leadership.

Broader Impact
With the focus of this project on women STEM faculty in Historically African-American Colleges and Universities, this project will contribute significantly to increasing gender diversity in the leadership ranks at these institutions. By supporting women of color in STEM fields in realizing their leadership potential, this program will help ensure that students and faculty in these disciplines will benefit from the skills, wisdom, breadth of experience and unique perspectives that such women will provide. The model designed for the TCSPP Academic Leadership Graduate Certificate Program has promise for broad dissemination across its eastcoast, midwest, and westcoast campuses and their wide professional networks.


News Article | October 25, 2016
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Raise your hand if you are sick of all the election coverage. Or constantly hearing about potential terror threats, the latest e.coli outbreak at that chain restaurant, or even Kim Kardashian. Chances are, your hand is up. Yet if you’re anything like me, you’re probably still a bit of a news junkie. As a journalist, news gathering is an inescapable part of my job. But those outside of the news business who follow the news almost as much as I do may put this down to "staying informed." Some may even see it as a civic duty to know what’s going on in their local area, or on a national or global level. For others, constantly checking the news may be just another way to fill up our ever-shortening attention spans with another quick hit of stimulation. No matter what your reasons for being a news junkie, researchers are finding that consuming news on an hourly or even daily basis is bad for your brain. Studies have shown that an overabundance of news can make you depressed, anxious, and, for the most part, doesn’t usually provide you with the ability to actually change or influence anything being reported. On the flip side, there’s evidence that giving up constantly following the news could make you happier and healthier. And that’s exactly what I wanted to see if I could prove. Would giving up following the news make a difference in my life? So for one week I completely avoided news of any kind: no websites, social media, television talking heads, or even newspapers. Here’s what happened. During the first 48 hours of giving up the news, my anxiety increased because I felt like I was "missing out" on what was going on in the world for every minute that was going by. But by midweek I found I didn’t miss "being informed" and my anxiousness subsided. By the end of the week I noticed my daily mood was actually more positive, and I was generally happier than I normally am. "Your brain creates mental models or assumptions about the world based on the information you take in," explains Pamela B. Rutledge, PhD, director of the Media Psychology Research Center and faculty in media psychology at Fielding Graduate University. "Thus when you are inundated with news, it triggers an instinctive survival response." And because of the "if it bleeds, it leads" mentality ingrained in the media, most news is negative, depressing, or fear inducing (fear of terrorism, fear of loss, fear of others), which inaccurately colors how we view the world as a whole. There’s actually a phrase for this. "Mean World Syndrome describes the phenomenon where you feel your immediate world is much more dangerous than it actually is because of the input you have received," says Rutledge. Indeed, by the end of the week, due to my lack of negative news input, I actually felt safer, or less worried about potentially harmful incidents, such as a terrorist attack (something the media always keeps at the forefront of people’s minds—especially those who live in a big city like me). A frequent reason news junkies will give for constantly following every latest development is that they feel it gives them a competitive edge in life. Short of a news alert announcing the impending arrival of a storm or some other potential disaster, constantly monitoring the news usually doesn’t give you any real-world advantage. Despite giving up the news for a week, I didn’t experience any kind of personal disadvantages compared to my neighbors or family who continued to follow the news. They didn't surpass me in wealth, happiness, or opportunities. When I mention this to Rutledge, she agrees with my assessment, at least over the short term. But she notes that completely swearing off the news for the rest of your days could affect other things in your life that you may not think it would. "Stepping away from the news would not necessarily detract from your social capital in many groups—certainly not in a week," says Rutledge. But, she continues: Perhaps the most surprising impact my news blackout had on me was that I actually felt more creative and focused by the end of the week. As a journalist and novelist, I need to constantly come up with story ideas, and the news is a goldmine. But by the end of the week, it was as if not constantly stuffing my mind with passive news stories and quick-hit tidbits and breaking news alerts allowed my brain to find its true imagination again. Rutledge says this increased creativity is actually related to stepping away from the mostly negative stories the news reports: An added benefit to my increased creativity: I had more time to explore my thoughts and ideas because I wasn’t wasting so much of it on following the news. Perhaps the most important takeaway from my news blackout is that "being informed" and being a "news junkie" are not the same thing. This is something that Rutledge stresses is an important distinction to make in our world of media overload. Rutledge says the inherent problems to news consumption are twofold. The first involves how you curate the news you choose to take in, how much you focus on a specific type of news, and how much time you devote to it. The second is that it's important to understand that there is a lot of conflict in the world, whether it's the fear-based political fighting over the U.S. presidential campaign or the U.K.’s Brexit. Constantly choosing to read and focus on those fears is emotional engagement, not cognitive engagement. For most people, following the news is done on an emotional engagement level, not on a cognitive engagement one. "What you have learned is the power of mindlessness versus mindfulness," says Rutledge. "Intentionality is key to the positive consumption of information. Intentionality allows you to frame the news so that it doesn’t amorphously change your life and leak into your thoughts unbidden." Mindful consumption of news means that we learn how to maintain an awareness of what and how much we are choosing to consume—not just intellectually, but somatically, Rutledge notes. Through increased awareness we can learn to feel in our bodies when the news is too much. In order to maintain a healthy relationship to the news, Rutledge says it's a good idea to take some time to step away from it every once in a while. "It’s important to leave mental ‘spaces’ instead of filling up every minute of your thoughts with news," says Rutledge. "I always think of management guru Peter Drucker who said that every year you have to quit doing about 25% of your job so you can figure out what new stuff needs doing. It’s like that with news, too."

Loading Fielding Graduate University collaborators
Loading Fielding Graduate University collaborators