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News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James) has identified a mechanism by which cancer cells develop resistance to a class of drugs called fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitors. Published in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, the study also found that use of a second inhibitor might improve the effectiveness of these drugs by possibly preventing resistance, and it recommends that clinical trials should be designed to include a second inhibitor. FGFR inhibitors are a new family of targeted agents designed to inhibit the action of the fibroblast growth factor receptor, which is often overexpressed in lung, bladder, biliary and breast cancers. "Understanding how drug resistance develops can help in the design of new agents or strategies to overcome resistance," says principal investigator Sameek Roychowdhury, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine and of pharmacology in the Division of Medical Oncology at the OSUCCC - James. "Our paper demonstrates in a laboratory model how cancer can evade this class of therapy, and it provides insights into how clinical trials for these therapies could be further developed to overcome the problem of drug resistance," he adds. The laboratory study by Roychowdhury and his colleagues induced resistance to the FGFR inhibitor BGJ398 in lung- and bladder-cancer cells after long-term exposure to the agent. The researchers then found that, while the drug continued to inhibit FGFR activity in the resistant cells, its inhibition of FGFR signaling had no appreciable effect on the cells' survival. Examining other molecules in the FGFR pathway, the researchers found that a regulatory protein called Akt remained highly active, even during FGFR inhibition. Akt, a key regulator of cell biology, is directly involved in cell proliferation, cell survival and cell growth. Furthermore, they found that by inhibiting Akt they could significantly slow cell proliferation, cell migration and cell invasion in the lung cancer and bladder cancer cells. "Fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitors are new therapies being developed in clinical trials for patients whose cancer cells have genetic alterations in this family of genes," says Roychowdhury, a member of the OSUCCC - James Translational Therapeutics Program. "We believe our findings will help improve this therapy for lung, bladder and other cancers."


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Columbus, Ohio - A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James) has identified a mechanism by which cancer cells develop resistance to a class of drugs called fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitors. Published in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, the study also found that use of a second inhibitor might improve the effectiveness of these drugs by possibly preventing resistance, and it recommends that clinical trials should be designed to include a second inhibitor. FGFR inhibitors are a new family of targeted agents designed to inhibit the action of the fibroblast growth factor receptor, which is often overexpressed in lung, bladder, biliary and breast cancers. "Understanding how drug resistance develops can help in the design of new agents or strategies to overcome resistance," says principal investigator Sameek Roychowdhury, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine and of pharmacology in the Division of Medical Oncology at the OSUCCC - James. "Our paper demonstrates in a laboratory model how cancer can evade this class of therapy, and it provides insights into how clinical trials for these therapies could be further developed to overcome the problem of drug resistance," he adds. The laboratory study by Roychowdhury and his colleagues induced resistance to the FGFR inhibitor BGJ398 in lung- and bladder-cancer cells after long-term exposure to the agent. The researchers then found that, while the drug continued to inhibit FGFR activity in the resistant cells, its inhibition of FGFR signaling had no appreciable effect on the cells' survival. Examining other molecules in the FGFR pathway, the researchers found that a regulatory protein called Akt remained highly active, even during FGFR inhibition. Akt, a key regulator of cell biology, is directly involved in cell proliferation, cell survival and cell growth. Furthermore, they found that by inhibiting Akt they could significantly slow cell proliferation, cell migration and cell invasion in the lung cancer and bladder cancer cells. "Fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitors are new therapies being developed in clinical trials for patients whose cancer cells have genetic alterations in this family of genes," says Roychowdhury, a member of the OSUCCC - James Translational Therapeutics Program. "We believe our findings will help improve this therapy for lung, bladder and other cancers." This work was supported by funding from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Cancer Society, the Prostate Cancer Foundation, Fore Cancer Research, American Lung Association and Pelotonia. Other Ohio State researchers involved in this study were Jharna Datta, Senthilkumar Damodaran, Hannah Parks, Cristina Ocrainiciuc, Jharna Miya, Lianbo Yu, Elijah P. Gardner, Eric Samorodnitsky, Michele R. Wing, Darshna Bhatt, John Hays and Julie W. Reeser. The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute strives to create a cancer-free world by integrating scientific research with excellence in education and patient-centered care, a strategy that leads to better methods of prevention, detection and treatment. Ohio State is one of only 47 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers and one of only a few centers funded by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials on novel anticancer drugs sponsored by the NCI. As the cancer program's 308-bed adult patient-care component, The James is one of the top cancer hospitals in the nation as ranked by U.S. News & World Report and has achieved Magnet designation, the highest honor an organization can receive for quality patient care and professional nursing practice. At 21 floors and with more than 1.1 million square feet, The James is a transformational facility that fosters collaboration and integration of cancer research and clinical cancer care. For more information, please visit cancer.osu.edu.


WILMINGTON, Del.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Incyte Corporation (Nasdaq:INCY) announces that 20 abstracts from its research and development portfolio will be presented at the upcoming 2017 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) annual meeting in Washington, D.C. from April 1-5, 2017. These abstracts include a clinical data presentation from the dose-escalation phase of the Company’s ongoing trial of its selective FGFR 1/2/3 inhibitor (INCB54828), and well as preclinical data from its small molecule inhibitor programs targeting PI3Kδ (INCB50465), LSD1 (INCB59872), JAK1 (INCB52793), BRD/BET (INCB54329 and INCB57643) and FGFR4 (INCB62079) and from its epacadostat, OX40 (INCAGN1949) and GITR (INCAGN1876) immuno-oncology programs. “The 20 abstracts to be presented at the upcoming AACR annual meeting underscore the breadth and potential of our innovative pipeline of oncology product candidates,” stated Reid Huber, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, Incyte. “We are pleased to share these new data with the scientific community, and look forward to progressing these and the other clinical programs in our growing portfolio.” Activity of the Selective FGFR 1, 2 and 3 Inhibitor INCB54828 in Genetically-Defined Models of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (Abstract #531) Preclinical Studies on Potential Therapeutic Combination Partners for the Potent and Selective PI3K Inhibitor INCB50465 in DLBCL (Abstract #143) The Evaluation of INCB59872, an FAD-Directed Covalent Inhibitor of LSD1, in Preclinical Models of Ewing Sarcoma (Abstract #1162) The Novel FGFR4-selective Inhibitor INCB62079 is Efficacious in Models of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Harboring FGF19 Amplification (Abstract #1234) Mechanisms of Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal Motif Inhibitor (BETi) Sensitivity in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) (Abstract #1518) Selective Inhibition of FGFR4 by INCB62079 is Efficacious in Models of FGF19- and FGFR4-Dependent Cancers (Abstract #2100) Combination of Epigenetic Regulation with Targeted Therapies Significantly Enhances Anti-Tumor Effects in Hematologic Malignancy Models (Abstract #2032) Preliminary Results from a Phase 1/2 Study of INCB54828, a Highly Selective Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) Inhibitor, in Patients (pts) with Advanced Malignancies (Abstract #CT111) INCB52793 JAK1 inhibitor synergizes with ATRA to inhibit expansion of AML (Abstract #3726) The LSD1 Specific Inhibitor INCB59872 Enhances the Activity of Immune Checkpoint Blockade by Reshaping the Myeloid Compartment in the Syngeneic 4T1 Mouse Mammary Tumor Model (Abstract #4635) The Selective Bromodomain Inhibitor, INCB54329 Targets both Cancer Cells and the Tumor Microenvironment in the KC Inflammatory Preclinical Model of Ductal Pancreatic Cancer (Abstract #5082) Preclinical Characterization of the Potent and Selective BET Inhibitor INCB57643 in Models of Hematologic Malignancies (Abstract #5071) Inhibition of IDO1 with Epacadostat Enhances Anti-Tumor Efficacy of PD-1 Blockade in a Syngeneic Glioblastoma (GBM) Model (Abstract #572) Agonist Antibodies Targeting OX40 and GITR Enhance the Activity of the IDO1-Selective Inhibitor Epacadostat in Preclinical Models (Abstract #2618) INCAGN1949, an Anti-OX40 Antibody with an Optimal Agonistic Profile, with the Ability to Selectively Deplete Intratumoral Regulatory T Cells in a Range of Tumor Indications (Abstract #4703) Phase 2, Open-Label, Monotherapy, Multicenter Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of INCB54828 in Subjects with Myeloid/Lymphoid Neoplasms with FGFR1 Rearrangement (Abstract #CT057) Phase 2, Open-label, Multicenter Study of the Efficacy and Safety of INCB54828 for Metastatic or Surgically Unresectable Urothelial Carcinoma Harboring Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF)/FGF Receptor (FGFR) Alterations (Abstract #CT059) Phase 2, Open-label, Multicenter Study of the Efficacy and Safety of INCB54828 in Patients with Advanced, Metastatic, or Surgically Unresectable Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) With Inadequate Response to Prior Therapy (Abstract #CT063) Full session details and data presentations at the AACR 2017 can be found here. Incyte Corporation is a Wilmington, Delaware-based biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of proprietary therapeutics. For additional information on Incyte, please visit the Company’s website at www.incyte.com. Except for the historical information set forth herein, the matters set forth in this press release, including statements regarding the presentation of data regarding the Company’s development portfolio and the potential effectiveness of such portfolio, contain predictions, estimates and other forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are based on the Company’s current expectations and subject to risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially, including unanticipated developments and the risks related to the efficacy or safety of the Company’s development pipeline, the results of further research and development, the high degree of risk and uncertainty associated with drug development, clinical trials and regulatory approval processes, other market or economic factors and competitive and technological advances; and other risks detailed from time to time in the Company’s reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the Form 10-K for the year ending December 31, 2016. Incyte disclaims any intent or obligation to update these forward-looking statements.


PubMed | University of Valencia, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Cell Division and Cancer Group and Fibroblast
Type: | Journal: Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE | Year: 2016

Relatively quiescent somatic stem cells support life-long cell renewal in most adult tissues. Neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain are restricted to two specific neurogenic niches: the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus and the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ; also called subependymal zone or SEZ) in the walls of the lateral ventricles. The development of in vivo gene transfer strategies for adult stem cell populations (i.e. those of the mammalian brain) resulting in long-term expression of desired transgenes in the stem cells and their derived progeny is a crucial tool in current biomedical and biotechnological research. Here, a direct in vivo method is presented for the stable genetic modification of adult mouse V-SVZ cells that takes advantage of the cell cycle-independent infection by LVs and the highly specialized cytoarchitecture of the V-SVZ niche. Specifically, the current protocol involves the injection of empty LVs (control) or LVs encoding specific transgene expression cassettes into either the V-SVZ itself, for the in vivo targeting of all types of cells in the niche, or into the lateral ventricle lumen, for the targeting of ependymal cells only. Expression cassettes are then integrated into the genome of the transduced cells and fluorescent proteins, also encoded by the LVs, allow the detection of the transduced cells for the analysis of cell autonomous and non-autonomous, niche-dependent effects in the labeled cells and their progeny.


News Article | December 8, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Earlier this week, researchers in Austria, Yugoslavia, and Australia presented their findings on the value of a protein called FGF18 as a potential diagnostic biomarker for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Surviving Mesothelioma has just posted a new article on the presentation. Click here to read it now. To test the protein’s value as a mesothelioma biomarker, the team collected samples of blood plasma from 107 mesothelioma patients, 49 healthy people, and 8 people with non-malignant pleural diseases. According to the report presented to lung cancer experts at this week's annual conference of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, the FGF18 level was much higher in mesothelioma patients than it was in healthy patients or those with other conditions. “Importantly, malignant pleural mesothelioma patients presenting with FGF18 levels below the median had a significantly longer overall survival when compared to those with high FGF18 levels,” states the report summary. “Because there is currently no definitive way to test for mesothelioma, treatment is often delayed while patients wait for a diagnosis,” says Alex Strauss, Managing Editor for Surviving Mesothelioma. “Every potential new mesothelioma biomarker is a step toward more effective diagnosis and treatment planning.” For a complete overview of the mesothelioma biomarker report presented at the IASLC meeting, see International Team Identifies Potential New Mesothelioma Biomarker, now available on the Surviving Mesothelioma website. Dong, Y, et al, “Circulating Fibroblast Growth Factor 18 is Elected in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Patients - A Multi-Institutional Study,” Paper presented at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer annual conference, December 2016, Vienna, Austria, http://library.iaslc.org/search?search_location=Stolz+2 For nearly ten years, Surviving Mesothelioma has brought readers the most important and ground-breaking news on the causes, diagnosis and treatment of mesothelioma. All Surviving Mesothelioma news is gathered and reported directly from the peer-reviewed medical literature. Written for patients and their loved ones, Surviving Mesothelioma news helps families make more informed decisions.


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) - Pipeline Review, H2 2016’, provides in depth analysis on Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) targeted pipeline therapeutics. The report provides comprehensive information on the Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) , targeted therapeutics, complete with analysis by indications, stage of development, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type. The report also covers the descriptive pharmacological action of the therapeutics, its complete research and development history and latest news and press releases. Additionally, the report provides an overview of key players involved in Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) targeted therapeutics development and features dormant and discontinued projects. Report features investigational drugs from across globe covering over 20 therapy areas and nearly 3,000 indications. Drug profiles featured in the report undergoes periodic review following a stringent set of processes to ensure that all the profiles are updated with the latest set of information. Additionally, various dynamic tracking processes ensure that the most recent developments are captured on a real time basis. The report helps in identifying and tracking emerging players in the market and their portfolios, enhances decision making capabilities and helps to create effective counter strategies to gain competitive advantage. - The report provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape for Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) - The report reviews Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) targeted therapeutics under development by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources - The report covers pipeline products based on various stages of development ranging from pre-registration till discovery and undisclosed stages - The report features descriptive drug profiles for the pipeline products which includes, product description, descriptive MoA, R&D brief, licensing and collaboration details & other developmental activities - The report reviews key players involved in Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) targeted therapeutics and enlists all their major and minor projects - The report assesses Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) targeted therapeutics based on mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type - The report summarizes all the dormant and discontinued pipeline projects - The report reviews latest news and deals related to Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) targeted therapeutics - Identify emerging players with potentially strong product portfolio and create effective counter-strategies to gain competitive advantage - Identify and understand the targeted therapy areas and indications for Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) - Identify the use of drugs for target identification and drug repurposing - Identify potential new clients or partners in the target demographic - Develop strategic initiatives by understanding the focus areas of leading companies - Plan mergers and acquisitions effectively by identifying key players and it’s most promising pipeline therapeutics - Devise corrective measures for pipeline projects by understanding Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) development landscape - Develop and design in-licensing and out-licensing strategies by identifying prospective partners with the most attractive projects to enhance and expand business potential and scope Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) Overview 7 Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) - Products under Development by Stage of Development 8 Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) - Products under Development by Therapy Area 9 Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) - Products under Development by Indication 10 Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) - Pipeline Products Glance 11 Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) - Products under Development by Companies 13 Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) - Therapeutics Assessment 15 Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) - Companies Involved in Therapeutics Development 21 Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) - Drug Profiles 25


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Neprilysin (Neutral Endopeptidase 24.11 or Atriopeptidase or Common Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Antigen or Skin Fibroblast Elastase or Enkephalinase or CD10 or MME or EC 3.4.24.11) - Pipeline Review, H2 2016" report to their offering. This report provides comprehensive information on the therapeutic development for Neprilysin, complete with comparative analysis at various stages, therapeutics assessment by drug targ


News Article | July 8, 2015
Site: www.inc.com

Here's a common tale: a successful financial services litigator who works with large hedge funds, financial institutions, and major commercial concerns one day decides to abandon his thriving career... and start a healthcare business. Okay, maybe not so common after all. Yet that's the story of Scott Vold, co-founder of Fibroblast, a company that makes software to ensures no patient falls through the cracks in the healthcare system--and then misses out on potentially lifesaving care. Of course there's more to the story than that. "Not that law isn't a great profession," Scott says, "but it wasn't the most fulfilling job for me. Then one day I was chatting with a friend and he asked for advice. Andrew is a gastroenterologist and colleague of his had a patient who had a microscopic amount of blood in his urine, so his colleague referred him to a specialist. He tried to follow up with his patient several times, tried to get in touch with the urologist he referred the patient to... and eighteen months later learned the patient had died of bladder cancer. "Andrew says this kind of thing happens all the time. He only knows who shows up in his office. He doesn't know about the patients who should be coming to see him. And he doesn't know if the patients he refers to other specialists actually follow through. "I went back to my office and I couldn't focus on anything else. It became this burning idea: we need to solve this problem because it touches everyone. In time Andrew and I realized it was not just an idea but a business--so together we started Fibroblast." So what has Scott, a first-time entrepreneur, learned about starting a business? After four or five months of sketching ideas on notepads we learned about lean startups and the concept of Minimum Viable Product. I went to a little business center and spent five or six hours putting together mockups of screens and we found a developer to build the alpha version of our product. Then we just kept putting that in front of practicing physicians and their staff to get feedback, and we finally got several small practices to help us prove our concept. Always start small. You don't know what you don't know... and a MVP is the perfect tool to get the feedback you need to create a product that customers will actually love. 2. Think beyond the customers you know. Since Andrew is an independent gastroenterologist with a great network of physicians and practices, in the early days of the company we felt if we could solve the problem for those practices our software would catch on like wildfire. So we started selling to those practices... but that's not easy because their margins are shrinking, their numbers are dwindling, they move slowly... And we soon realized we were growing too slowly. Then I pulled my head up from the weeds and thought about the Affordable Care Act and its affect on the overall healthcare market. Fee for value was a growing trend and major health systems needed better tools to make sure patients didn't leak out of their systems. So we started to sell to big health systems. While those deals move slowly and are incredibly complex, they are also great deals in that they allow us to gain scale very quickly. As in many industries, healthcare is all about reference-based selling. Once you land your first customer, every one after that becomes incrementally easier. (Large providers don't want to be first.) Multibillion-dollar companies lead the market, and those systems are unable to take risks on smaller, earlier-stage companies because their margin of error has been slashed. So it's a catch-22 of sorts: when you get the first client that is the right size, right shape, etc, and can point to it and say, "This system that looks like you trusts us... and here's some data to support what we've done... and here's some people you can talk to..." that goes a long way. At first we were eager to sell to anyone; in time we realized we really needed to segment the market, create a profile for an idea customer, and thoroughly understand why a healthcare system would buy our technology. That let target our messaging use language that they use and understand--and that got us in the door because our message resonated deeply. 5. Embrace a different (better) kind of stress. Our early days were stressful, but the level of stress and type of stress I feel now is categorically different than what I felt as a lawyer. When I was practicing the stress was heavy, oppressive... every single interaction was an argument with someone else. What I have now is a positive type of stress: I can see the goal we're trying to achieve and we're working hard to get there, but the outcome is uncertain. But, there is much more of a direct line of sight between effort and outcome: I feel much more in control of my own destiny and the company's success. There is also the stress of knowing there are patients in that healthcare system that should be seeing a specialist or getting additional care... and they won't. If they had our software they would get the care they need. We hear countless stories from people saying, "I wish my aunt or uncle or dad had something like this when the doctor told him to get the colonoscopy. They never did, and unfortunately he has colon cancer." That's also a stress of sorts. We're worried that patients aren't being taken care of. But it's a good kind of stress, because it's incredibly motivating to know we can make a real difference in peoples' lives. 6. Don't think you need to move. We're a tech company but we made the conscious decision to stay in Chicago. I'm a native, my co-founder moved here for his residency, and we're committed to growing the healthcare community here. There are good business reasons to stay in Chicago as well. We have an incredible ecosystem for healthcare: world-renowned healthcare systems, some of the best pharmaceutical and medical device companies, major public and private support, angel investors and VCs who want to support homegrown companies.... Put all those things together and this is a great place to be--we have everything we need to meet the needs of our customers. Plus I'm proud of my city and I want to help be a part of the growth of the tech community here. We're working to build a company we're proud of--why not do that in a city we're proud of?


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor or Heparin Binding Growth Factor 2 or FGF2) - Pipeline Review, H2 2016" report to their offering. The report provides comprehensive information on the Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor or Heparin Binding Growth Factor 2 or FGF2) , targeted therapeutics, complete with analysis by indications, stage of development, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type. The report also covers the descriptive pharmacological action of the therapeutics, its complete research and development history and latest news and press releases. Additionally, the report provides an overview of key players involved in Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor or Heparin Binding Growth Factor 2 or FGF2) targeted therapeutics development and features dormant and discontinued projects. For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/lc5nc6/fibroblast_growth

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