FEV North America Inc.

Auburn Hills, MI, United States

FEV North America Inc.

Auburn Hills, MI, United States
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Patent
FEV North America Inc. | Date: 2016-02-10

Radar testing systems with radar system rotational systems and methods for using the radar testing systems are disclosed. A radar testing system includes a radar system to be tested, a computer, and a radar simulator. A radar sensor rotation system mechanically coupled to a radar sensor of the radar system is communicatively coupled to the computer and configured to rotate the radar sensor to predefined and desired angles for predetermined amounts of time during testing of the radar system.


An exhaust diagnostic system. The system includes a diesel engine having an exhaust system with a diesel particulate filter (DPF), a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, a first NOx sensor located upstream of the SCR catalyst and a second NOx sensor located downstream of the SCR catalyst. In addition, an engine control unit (ECU) is in electronic communication with the first NOx sensor and the second NOx sensor. An SCR coordinator can be included and be configured to execute a non-intrusive SCR deNOx efficiency test, an intrusive SCR/DOC deNOx efficiency test and an intrusive DOC non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) conversion efficiency test on the exhaust system. As a result of the conversion efficiency tests, a distinction can be made as to whether the SCR catalyst or DOC is failing.


Jeihouni Y.,FEV North America Inc. | Eichler K.,RWTH Aachen | Franke M.,FEV North America Inc.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2016

In order to comply with demanding Greenhous Gas (GHG) standards, future automotive engines employ advanced engine technologies including waste heat recovery (WHR) systems. A waste heat recovery system converts part of engine wasted exergies to useful work which can be fed back to the engine. Utilizing this additional output power leads to lower specific fuel consumption and CO2 emission when the total output power equals the original engine output power. Engine calibration strategies for reductions in specific fuel consumption typically results in a natural increase of NOx emissions. The utilization of waste heat recovery systems provides a pathway which gives both reduction in emissions and reduction in specific fuel consumption. According to DOE (Department of Energy), US heavy-duty truck engines' technology need to be upgraded towards higher brake thermal efficiencies (BTE). DOE target is BTE>55% for Class-8 heavy-duty vehicles in the United States. On the other side, the emissions legislation is currently under review in California aiming at around 80% reduction in NOx emission to improve air quality according to California Air Resources Board (CARB). The heavy-duty vehicles are the primary emitters of NOx. Reduction of NOx emission to such stringent proposed target demands a very high NOx catalyst efficiency and more investment in exhaust aftertreatment systems. The waste heat recovery system, however, reduces the fuel consumption as well as the engine out NOx emission at the original engine output power. The reason for that is the engine produces the same power with lower fuel energy which affects the engine operating points in engine fuel maps. This paper will discuss a feasible waste heat recovery system for on-road heavy-duty diesel engine application under relevant boundary conditions. With the help of thermodynamic calculations the incremental power from waste heat recovery system as well as the fuel economy benefit will be calculated and discussed. As main topic, potentials for reduction of NOx emission and the other pollutants by using waste heat recovery system will be presented for a representative engine. Copyright © 2016 SAE International.


Haenel P.,FEV North America Inc. | Kleeberg H.,FEV North America Inc. | de Bruijn R.,FEV North America Inc. | Tomazic D.,FEV North America Inc.
SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants | Year: 2017

Modern combustion engines must meet increasingly higher requirements concerning emission standards, fuel economy, performance characteristics and comfort. Especially fuel consumption and the related CO2 emissions were moved into public focus within the last years. One possibility to meet those requirements is downsizing. Engine downsizing is intended to achieve a reduction of fuel consumption through measures that allow reducing displacement while simultaneously keeping or increasing power and torque output. However, to reach that goal, downsized engines need high brake mean effective pressure levels which are well in excess of 20bar. When targeting these high output levels at low engine speeds, undesired combustion events with high cylinder peak pressures can occur that can severely damage the engine. These phenomena, typically called low speed pre-ignition (LSPI), set currently an undesired limit to downsizing. This study analyzes the influence of ethanol fuel content on low speed pre-ignition events in a direct-injection turbo charged gasoline engine with a homogeneous (λ = 1) common rail high pressure injection system, side mounted multi-hole injectors and dual variable valve timing. All experiments were conducted on a steady state engine test bench with intake air, coolant, oil and fuel conditioning to be able to separate fuel effects from boundary condition influences. In addition, the engine was equipped with a prototype engine controller that allows to negate the influence of control algorithms on combustion. Four ethanol fuels containing different levels of ethanol were blended using the same base fuel and denatured ethanol. The investigated blends included E10, E20, E30 and E50 fuels. Subsequently, test runs were performed to understand the impact of different ethanol blends on occurrence, number and pressure characteristics of LSPI. © 2017 SAE International.


Tatur M.,FEV North America Inc. | Govindswamy K.,FEV North America Inc. | Tomazic D.,FEV North America Inc.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2017

Demanding CO2 and fuel economy regulations are continuing to pressure the automotive industry into considering innovative powertrain and vehicle-level solutions. Powertrain engineers continue to minimize engine internal friction and transmission parasitic losses with the aim of reducing overall vehicle fuel consumption. Strip friction methods are used to determine and isolate components in engines and transmissions with the highest contribution to friction losses. However, there is relatively little focus on friction optimization of Front-End-Accessory-Drive (FEAD) components such as alternators and Air Conditioning (AC) compressors. This paper expands on the work performed by other researchers' specifically targeting in-depth understanding of system design and operating strategy. Prime focus of the first part of the study is to outline the development of a flexible test stand that allows for highly accurate torque measurements on such components under precisely controlled environmental boundary conditions and device loads. Initial testing results from multiple test units are also presented. This paper will detail aspects of the test stand design that provide flexibility for adaptation to various test scenarios. The results from measurements for a number of FEAD components will be shown in the context of scatterbands derived from multiple component tests. Key results from direct-drive and belt-driven component tests will be compared to illustrate the influence of the belt layout on mechanical efficiency of the FEAD system. Copyright © 2017 SAE International.


Wellmann T.,FEV North America Inc. | Govindswamy K.,FEV North America Inc. | Tomazic D.,FEV North America Inc.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2017

The automotive industry continues to develop new technologies aimed at reducing overall vehicle level fuel consumption. Powertrain and driveline related technologies will play a key role in helping OEM's meet fleet CO2 reduction targets for 2025 and beyond. Specifically, use of technologies such as downsized engines, idle start-stop systems, aggressive torque converter lock-up schedules, wide-ratio spread transmissions, and electrified propulsion systems are vital towards meeting aggressive fuel economy targets. Judicious combinations of such powertrain and driveline technology packages in conjunction with measures such as the use of low rolling resistance tires and vehicle lightweighting will be required to meet future OEM fleet CO2 targets. Many of the technologies needed for meeting the fuel economy and CO2 targets come with unique NVH challenges. In order to ensure customer acceptance of new vehicles, it is imperative that these NVH challenges be understood and solved. This paper will begin with an introduction of the legislative framework with respect to fuel economy and CO2 targets for light duty vehicles. Key megatrends of engine, transmission, driveline, and electrified propulsion systems will be examined, following which the NVH behavior of each sub-system will be illustrated. A combination of experimentally measured data and simulations will be used to demonstrate key NVH challenges such as high levels of combustion noise, increased driveline torsional excitation, start-stop refinement, shift quality, and high-frequency whine noise from motors/generators in electrified propulsion systems. Examples of component-level and system-level NVH countermeasures will be discussed. Finally, the use of advanced test and simulation-based methodologies for smooth NVH refinement of future propulsion systems will be illustrated using case study examples. Copyright © 2017 SAE International.


Andert J.,RWTH Aachen | Herold K.,RWTH Aachen | Savelsberg R.,RWTH Aachen | Pischinger M.,FEV North America Inc.
IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology | Year: 2016

Range extender operation in an electric vehicle should be imperceptible to the driver from a noise/vibration standpoint. Rolling torque compensation allows virtually vibration-free range extender engine operation by utilizing a balanced counter-rotating inertia that is geared to the cranktrain. The combustion process results in engine torque fluctuations that could cause gear rattle in such a system due to a combination of torque reversal and lash in the geared connection. This brief paper addresses the problem of gear rattle in a rolling torque compensation system. First, a preloaded split gear is introduced as a potential mechanical solution to eliminate the clearance in the gear contact zone. In addition, an approach for a mechatronic solution involving active shaping of the generator torque is introduced. This methodology includes measurement of the combustion engine torque via cylinder pressure indication data, calculation of allowable torque limits, and the determination of a generator torque profile to address gear rattle. A multicriteria cost function is introduced to determine the optimal torque within the established constraints. Variations of the cost function are investigated with respect to their impact on efficiency and range extender acoustics. © 1993-2012 IEEE.


Dahodwala M.,FEV North America Inc. | Joshi S.,FEV North America Inc. | Koehler E.,FEV North America Inc. | Franke M.,FEV North America Inc. | Tomazic D.,FEV North America Inc.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2015

Substitution of diesel fuel with natural gas in heavy-duty diesel engines offers significant advantages in terms of operating cost, as well as NOx, PM emissions and greenhouse gas emissions. However, the challenges of high THC and CO emissions, combustion stability, exhaust temperatures and pressure rise rates limit the substitution levels across the engine operating map and necessitate an optimized combustion strategy. Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion has shown promise in regard to improving combustion efficiency at low and medium loads and simultaneously reducing NOx emissions at higher loads. RCCI combustion exploits the difference in reactivity between two fuels by introducing a less reactive fuel, such as natural gas, along with air during the intake stroke and igniting the air-CNG mixture by injecting a higher reactivity fuel, such as diesel, later in the compression stroke. Recent studies to optimize dual fuel diesel-CNG RCCI combustion have primarily focused on the simultaneous reduction of NOx and soot emissions. However, further investigation is needed to outline the in-cylinder conditions that are required in order for RCCI combustion to proceed. In addition, the THC emissions produced under dual fuel diesel-CNG RCCI operation need to be analyzed to better understand how to address this limitation of the technology. The current study builds on the dual fuel diesel-CNG study previously presented by the same set of authors by analyzing the experimental RCCI combustion results achieved on a heavy-duty diesel engine at 6 bar BMEP and multiple engine speeds. The study evaluates the impact of various control variables, such as CNG substitution, EGR rate and injection strategy on achieving RCCI combustion at 6 bar BMEP, thereby establishing a general framework for in-cylinder mixture properties required in realizing RCCI combustion. The conclusions at 6 bar BMEP are supported by 3D simulations of the complete combustion chamber using Converge CFD software. CFD results are also used to highlight the causes of high CH4 and CO emissions with dual fuel diesel-CNG RCCI operation. Further, the paper analyzes the experimental RCCI combustion results at 14 bar BMEP and multiple engine speeds to lay out the challenges in achieving RCCI combustion at increased engine load. Copyright © 2015 SAE International.


Parbat A.,FEV North America Inc. | Tousignant T.,FEV North America Inc. | Govindswamy K.,FEV North America Inc.
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2015

The definition of vehicle and powertrain level NVH targets is one of the first tasks toward establishing where a vehicle's NVH behavior will reside with respect to the current or future state of industry. Realization of vehicle level NVH targets relies on a combination of competitive powertrain (source) and vehicle (path) NVH performance. Assessment of vehicle NVH sensitivity is well understood, and can be accomplished through determination of customer interface NVH response to measured excitations at the source input locations. However, development of appropriate powertrain source targets can be more difficult, particularly related to sound quality. This paper discusses various approaches for definition of powertrain targets for sound quality, with a specific focus on impulsive noise. Copyright © 2015 SAE International.


Patent
FEV North America Inc. | Date: 2015-01-19

A process and a system for preventing pre-ignition in an internal combustion engine (ICE). The process includes providing an ICE that has a combustion chamber and an exhaust. Also provided is a total hydro-carbon (THC) sensor in communication with the combustion chamber. The THC sensor senses a THC level of the combusted gas for a given combustion cycle i (THC_(i)) of the ICE. In the event that THC_(i )is greater than a reference THC level (THC_(ref)), a pre-ignition countermeasure prior to an immediate subsequent combustion cycle i+1 is executed. Furthermore, the executed pre-ignition countermeasure prevents pre-ignition from occurring in the immediate subsequent combustion cycle i+1 of the ICE.

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