Fertility North

Joondalup, Australia

Fertility North

Joondalup, Australia

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Stemp M.,Fertility North | Stemp M.,Edith Cowan University | Roberts P.,Edith Cowan University | McClements A.,Fertility North | And 5 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Reproduction | Year: 2014

Objective: Biomarkers associated with cancer screening (CA125, CA15-3, CA72-4, total prostate specific antigen [tPSA]) and the monitoring of pregnancy (pregnancy associated plasma protein-A [PAPP-A]) were measured during natural and stimulated ovarian cycles in disease-free non-pregnant women to determine if they could reflect normal events relating to ovulation and/or endometrial changes. Methods: A total of 73 blood samples (10 women) collected throughout the natural menstrual cycle, and 64 blood samples (11 women) taken during stimulated ovarian cycles, were analysed on the Roche Cobas e411 automated analyser. Results: Detectable levels of tPSA were measured in at least one point in the cycle in 6/10 of women in the natural cycle and 10/11 of women in stimulated cycles, and CA72-4 was detected in only 12/21 women tested. Concentrations of CA125, tPSA, CA15-3 and CA72-4 showed no significant difference between the natural and stimulated ovarian cycle groups. On average the mean PAPP-A of the natural group was (2.41±0.58) mIU/L higher than the stimulated group (t=4.10, P< 0.001). CA125 and CA15-3 results were both significantly influenced by the stage of the cycle (P<0.0001), whereas tPSA and PAPP-A concentrations revealed no significant changes (P≥0.65). CA72-4 was not affected by the stage of the cycle nor ovarian stimulation. Conclusion: Ovarian stimulation reduced serum PAPP-A levels, CA125 and CA15-3 levels were generally unaffected by ovarian stimulation but displayed cyclical changes throughout both natural and stimulated cycles, whilst tPSA and CA72-4 were not affected by the stage of the cycle or ovarian stimulation. © 2014 Hainan Medical College.


Stemp M.,Fertility North | Stemp M.,Edith Cowan University | McClements A.,Fertility North | Sykes P.,Fertility North | And 3 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Reproduction | Year: 2013

Objective: To compare the results of two automated analysers by measuring reproductive hormones using the same quality control. Methods: Results obtained by the Roche Cobas e411 automated analyser in a specialised fertility clinic were compared to the Siemens Centaur CP for the reproductive hormones oestradiol, progesterone, LH, FSH and hCG. Results: Commercially-available quality control (QC) samples showed significant differences between the two assays for all five hormones at one or more levels. In clinical samples, the range of concentrations encountered was similar to the QC samples for LH and FSH but much higher for oestradiol, progesterone, and hCG showing the limitations of such QC samples in a specialised fertility setting when they are intended for general pathology use. There was a high degree of correlation for all hormones (all r>0.985) and a gradient close to 1 for all, except for hCG when the Siemens analyser read ≥1 000 IU/L (. r=1.209) and this is reflected in a large mean bias (-2 647.9 IU/L) and coefficient of repeatability (11 690.0 IU/L) when using a Bland-Altman plot. Conclusions: Despite an overall agreement between the two assay platforms for progesterone, LH and FSH, small differences between the two analysers in the concentrations of oestradiol and hCG as encountered in natural ovarian cycles or at the time of pregnancy testing may require a redefinition of clinical cut-offs. © 2013 Hainan Medical College.


Yap K.,Fertility North | Matson P.,Fertility North | Matson P.,Edith Cowan University
Asian Pacific Journal of Reproduction | Year: 2012

Objective: To explore a method of semen storage prior to assessment of sperm DNA fragmentation. Methods: This study examined a simplified alternative of air-drying semen on a microscope slide and reconstituting in seminal plasma prior to assessment of sperm DNA fragmentation using the halosperm® G2 kit. Results: It showed that semen could be air-dried and stored overnight at room temperature with no detrimental effect on DNA quality. A significant correlation between results existed for 20 semen samples both air-dried and snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen (. r=0.982, P=0.000). A mean difference between the results of only -1.98% confirmed the effectiveness of air-drying compared to snap-freezing. Conclusions: Future studies to refine this technique are required on the effect of extrinsic factors such as the choice of reconstituting medium, and stability over an extended time-frame at different temperatures. © 2012 Hainan Medical College.


Liu Y.,Fertility North | Peirce K.,Fertility North | Yap K.,Fertility North | McKenzie K.,Fertility North | And 5 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Reproduction | Year: 2012

Objective: To study the performance of thawed zygotes and cleavage stage embryos transferred either on the day of thaw or after overnight culture. Methods: A retrospective study of 864 frozen embryo transfer cycles. Cryosurvival rates per thawed embryo and implantation rates were analysed for embryos frozen on Day 1, Day 2 or Day 3 relative to oocyte collection (Day 0) and transferred on the day of thaw or after overnight culture, together with clinical pregnancy rates and prevalence of multiple gestations. Results: Survival of Day 3 embryos was significantly lower than those frozen on Day 1 (P=0.017) or Day 2 (P=0.015). Following overnight culture, resumption of mitosis of zygotes was more frequent than Day 2 (P=0.000) which are in turn higher than Day 3 (P=0.000) embryos. The implantation rate for Day 2 embryos dividing overnight was significantly higher than those that did not divide for women <35 yrs (P=0.001) but not those women <35 yrs (P=0.055). There were no differences in the implantation rates for those dividing or not after culture, for embryos frozen on Day 3 for women <35 yrs (P=0.254) or <35 yrs (P=0.403). Conclusions: Later cleavage stage post-thaw embryos survive and resume mitosis less frequently compared to earlier stages. Embryos not resuming mitosis after culture overnight can implant, particularly Day 3 embryos, suggesting that they can further increase the cumulative pregnancy rate per oocyte collection and that discarding them is wasteful. Overnight culture is best used for logistical reasons rather than a strategy to improve pregnancy rates. © 2012 Hainan Medical College.


Yap K.,Fertility North | Cawley T.,Fertility North | Matson P.,Fertility North | Matson P.,Edith Cowan University | Matson P.,Specialist Medical Center
Asian Pacific Journal of Reproduction | Year: 2013

Objective: To introduce a system using spiked seminal plasma for the QC of the MAR direct test, and to facilitate the determination of assay variability. Methods: A simple quality control (QC) system for use in the direct MAR test was developed using samples prepared by adding serum to antibody-negative centrifuged seminal plasma to obtain optimal binding, and storing 0.4 mL aliquots at -20 °C in straws. The serum was either from vasectomised men (positive control) or an antibody-negative woman (negative control). QC samples were thawed and mixed 1:1 with donor semen and pre-incubated for 1 hr at 37 °C, and tested for sperm antibodies using the direct method of the MarScreen IgG kit (Fertility Technology Resources, USA). Two batches of controls were prepared and one of these was run on each day. Results: The negative controls invariably gave binding of less than 5%, whereas the two positive controls had binding (mean ± sd) of 89.5% ± 6.2 % (coefficient of variation [CV] = 7.0%) and (97.2 ± 2.5) (CV = 2.6%). Conclusions: In summary, spiked seminal plasma incubated with whole semen can be used as a QC sample in the direct MAR IgG test. © 2013 Hainan Medical College.


Matson P.,Fertility North | Matson P.,Edith Cowan University | Tardif S.,University of Dundee | Tardif S.,Minitube Of America
Reproductive Biology | Year: 2012

Non-animal macromolecules (Select Phytone™ UF, wheat peptone, dextran 40, hydroxyethyl starch and methyl cellulose) as an alternative medium supplement for human spermatozoa were compared to bovine serum albumin. Select Phytone™ UF and wheat peptone discolored the medium and smelled like broth, making them unlikely to be acceptable for clinical use, whilst the others were colorless and odorless. All supplements were effective in the yield of spermatozoa isolated by swim-up technique, and maintenance of sperm motility. In summary, there are non-animal macromolecules that will support short-term sperm culture. © 2012 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn.


Zuvela E.,Fertility Specialists WA | Junk S.,Fertility Specialists WA | Moska N.,Hollywood Fertility Center | Matson P.,Fertility North | Matson P.,Edith Cowan University
Reproductive Biology | Year: 2011

The usefulness of latex beads of defined concentration was assessed as a substitute for sperm in the performance of External Quality Assurance (EQA) and Internal Quality Control (IQC) of semen analysis. Within the EQA programme, mean±SEM bias (%) was significantly reduced in 2007 compared to 2002 for both specialist (6.0%±5.4% vs. 55.0%±5.9%) and non-specialist (18.4%±5.9% vs. 90.9%±13.4%) laboratories (both p<0.0001), indicating improved accuracy over time. Within the IQC programme, the beads were used in the appraisal of two scientists, one experienced and one inexperienced, against a known standard. Beads were also used to calibrate eleven counting chambers, resulting in one old chamber being discarded due to its poor performance. The present study has shown that the use of a defined concentration of beads is an excellent adjunct to IQC and EQA programmes enabling the performance of both people and equipment to be assessed in an objective manner.


Hadlow N.,Western Diagnostic Pathology | Hadlow N.,University of Western Australia | Longhurst K.,Western Diagnostic Pathology | McClements A.,Fertility North | And 4 more authors.
Fertility and Sterility | Year: 2013

Objective: To assess the variability of antimüllerian hormone (AMH) concentrations in women with "adequate ovarian reserve" during unstimulated menstrual cycles and to determine the impact on clinical classifications. Design: Pilot cohort study. Setting: Private fertility clinic. Patient(s): Twelve consecutive women (aged 29 to 43 years) referred to a fertility service, with AMH measurements repeated throughout unstimulated cycle, and who had at least one AMH measurement indicating "adequate ovarian reserve." Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): AMH concentrations assessed in 82 serum samples from 12 women compared against the published cutoffs for reduced ovarian reserve and for risk of excessive response to ovarian stimulation. Result(s): Over half the women (7 of 12) were reclassified as a result of testing AMH concentrations at different phases of the menstrual cycle. Over one-third (4 or 5 of 12) crossed a cutoff for reduced ovarian reserve; 2 of 12 crossed cutoffs predicting hyperstimulation. There was a statistically significant change in AMH concentration according to the day of the cycle, with a negative trend of the median AMH concentration from the follicular to luteal phase. The maximum change in median AMH concentration over cycle was 7.9 pmol/L, and the mean difference between the maximum and minimum AMH was 6.7 pmol/L. Conclusion(s): In this pilot study, the AMH concentration varied during menstrual cycle, and the clinical classification of the ovarian response was altered. © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine.


McEvoy A.,Edith Cowan University | Roberts P.,Edith Cowan University | Yap K.,Fertility North | Matson P.,Edith Cowan University
Fertility and Sterility | Year: 2014

Intervention(s): Comparison of sperm DNA fragmentation levels (DFLs) using fresh, snap-frozen and air-dried semen, with air-dried samples stored at different temperatures and time periods to assess DNA stability.Objective: To develop a simple, convenient, and stable storage method for semen before DNA fragmentation testing.Design: Experimental cross-sectional study.Setting: Fertility clinic.Patient(s): 164 male partners of infertile couples.Main Outcome Measure(s): DFL determined by Halosperm G2 kit.Result(s): Results are expressed as mean ± standard error of the mean. The DFLs from fresh and air-dried semen gave comparable results (1.08% ± 0.65%), and from snap-frozen and fresh samples a statistically significant difference (5.5% ± 1.09%). Air-dried semen stored at room temperature for 7 days had a statistically significantly higher DFL compared with semen stored overnight (46.29% ± 9.12%). Samples stored at 4°C for 7 days or 1 day showed no statistically significant difference (0.83% ± 0.82%). DFLs from samples stored for either 1 or 30 days at 4°C showed a statistically significant difference (19.59% ± 5.72%); those stored at -22°C showed no statistically significant difference (0.68% ± 0.53%).Conclusion(s): Air-drying semen is a simple and stable storage method for up to 1 month at -22°C before DNA fragmentation testing. © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine.


PubMed | Fertility North
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Reproductive biology | Year: 2012

Non-animal macromolecules (Select Phytone UF, wheat peptone, dextran 40, hydroxyethyl starch and methyl cellulose) as an alternative medium supplement for human spermatozoa were compared to bovine serum albumin. Select Phytone UF and wheat peptone discolored the medium and smelled like broth, making them unlikely to be acceptable for clinical use, whilst the others were colorless and odorless. All supplements were effective in the yield of spermatozoa isolated by swim-up technique, and maintenance of sperm motility. In summary, there are non-animal macromolecules that will support short-term sperm culture.

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