Fertility Centers of New England

Reading, MA, United States

Fertility Centers of New England

Reading, MA, United States
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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Fertility Centers of New England is proud to announce that our own Dr. Joseph A. Hill has been recognized by his peers in NH Magazine as one of the leading Reproductive Endocrinologists and Infertility Specialists in the NH 2017 list of Top Docs. “We feel fortunate to count Dr. Hill among our team of experienced reproductive endocrinologists and infertility specialists,” said Fertility Centers of New England Medical Director, Danielle Vitiello, MD. “His expertise and knowledge together with his dedication to individualized patient-focused care have helped set FCNE apart as one of the premier reproductive treatment centers in the country.” “It is an honor and a privilege to be able to serve those needing advanced reproductive care,” said Dr. Hill. “I am also gratified to have been so recognized by physicians in NH,” he continued. Dr. Joseph Hill is President of the Fertility Centers of New England. He is a world-renowned speaker and expert in reproductive medicine, especially relating to infertility and recurrent pregnancy loss. Dr. Hill completed his post-doctoral fellowship training in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility and in Reproductive Immunology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Hill has been awarded several academic scholarships; published more than 150 scientific and clinical papers and textbook chapters; and presented at numerous medical and scientific meetings in 22 countries. He is a member of many professional associations, including the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Gynecological and Obstetrical Society, the Society for Gynecologic Investigation, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, and the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. Dr. Hill is available to see patients in our Reading, MA, Boston, MA and Portsmouth, NH locations.


Balaban B.,American Hospital | Brison D.,St Marys Hospital | Calderon G.,IVI Barcelona | Catt J.,Optimal IVF | And 18 more authors.
Human Reproduction | Year: 2011

BACKGROUND: Many variations in oocyte and embryo grading make inter-laboratory comparisons extremely difficult. This paper reports the proceedings of an international consensus meeting on oocyte and embryo morphology assessment. Methods Background presentations about current practice were given. Results The expert panel developed a set of consensus points to define the minimum criteria for oocyte and embryo morphology assessment. CONCLUSIONS It is expected that the definition of common terminology and standardization of laboratory practice related to embryo morphology assessment will result in more effective comparisons of treatment outcomes. This document is intended to be referenced as a global consensus to allow standardized reporting of the minimum data set required for the accurate description of embryo development. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved.


Finn A.,Fertility Centers of New England | Scott L.,Fertility Centers of New England | O'Leary T.,Fertility Centers of New England | Davies D.,Fertility Centers of New England | Hill J.,Fertility Centers of New England
Reproductive BioMedicine Online | Year: 2010

The delivery rates of 298 patients having preimplantation genetic diagnosis with aneuploidy screening (PGS) were compared with the delivery rates of 144 PGS patients that cancelled the plan for PGS with embryo transfer on day 2 or day 3. The goal of this study was to compare the impact of embryo de-selection with PGS to embryo selection using sequential embryo scoring (SES) on outcome in poor-prognosis patients. Embryos with good sequential scores were more likely to have a normal PGS result than embryos with poor SES scores (34% versus 12%; P < 0.05). Patients proceeding with PGS had an overall delivery rate of 15% per oocyte retrieval. There was a significant difference in delivery rates between patients with less than six embryos and patients with greater than six embryos (6% versus 19%; P < 0.005). The overall delivery rate for patients having transfers without PGS was 23% (P < 0.05 compared with PGS patients) with no difference between low and good responders. It was concluded that PGS neither enhanced nor impaired delivery rates in high responding poor-prognosis patients yet SES may be more accurate than PGS as a means of selection for low-responding poor-prognosis patients. © 2010, Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Balaban B.,American Hospital | Brison D.,St Marys Hospital | Calderon G.,IVI Barcelona | Catt J.,Optimal IVF | And 17 more authors.
Reproductive BioMedicine Online | Year: 2011

This paper reports the proceedings of an international consensus meeting on oocyte and embryo morphology assessment. Following background presentations about current practice, the expert panel developed a set of consensus points to define the minimum criteria for oocyte and embryo morphology assessment. It is expected that the definition of common terminology and standardization of laboratory practice related to embryo morphology assessment will result in more effective comparisons of treatment outcomes. This document is intended to be referenced as a global consensus to allow standardized reporting of the minimum dataset required for the accurate description of embryo development. This paper reports the proceedings and outcomes of an international consensus meeting on human oocyte and embryo morphology assessment. An expert panel developed a series of consensus points to define the minimum criteria for such assessments. The definition of common terminology, and standardization of laboratory practices related to these morphological assessments, will permit more effective comparisons of treatment outcomes around the world. This report is intended to be referenced as a global consensus to allow standardized reporting of the minimum descriptive criteria required for routine clinical evaluations of human embryo development in vitro. © 2011 ALPHA Scientists in Reproductive Medicine and the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Fertility Centers of New England
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Reproductive biomedicine online | Year: 2010

The delivery rates of 298 patients having preimplantation genetic diagnosis with aneuploidy screening (PGS) were compared with the delivery rates of 144 PGS patients that cancelled the plan for PGS with embryo transfer on day 2 or day 3. The goal of this study was to compare the impact of embryo de-selection with PGS to embryo selection using sequential embryo scoring (SES) on outcome in poor-prognosis patients. Embryos with good sequential scores were more likely to have a normal PGS result than embryos with poor SES scores (34% versus 12%; P<0.05). Patients proceeding with PGS had an overall delivery rate of 15% per oocyte retrieval. There was a significant difference in delivery rates between patients with less than six embryos and patients with greater than six embryos (6% versus 19%; P<0.005). The overall delivery rate for patients having transfers without PGS was 23% (P<0.05 compared with PGS patients) with no difference between low and good responders. It was concluded that PGS neither enhanced nor impaired delivery rates in high responding poor-prognosis patients yet SES may be more accurate than PGS as a means of selection for low-responding poor-prognosis patients.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Fertility Centers of New England is proud to announce that we have been designated as a Cigna Infertility Center of Excellence. The Cigna Center of Excellence recognizes participating infertility centers that meet or exceed rigorous performance standards. “It’s an honor to be designated a Cigna Infertility Center of Excellence," said Fertility Centers of New England President and CEO, Joseph A. Hill, M.D. “This designation speaks to our commitment to providing our patients with the highest levels of care, affordable treatment options, and high success rates.” Cigna makes information about the quality and cost of health care services available to its members to help them make informed decisions about their health care needs. The Fertility Centers of New England has met and surpassed all the qualifying criteria for this recognition. “We hope this information helps our potential patients make more informed decisions about their healthcare options," Hill said. “There are few IVF centers in the United States achieving both Center of Excellence status and accreditation by the AAAHC," he added. “Our entire team is very proud to be a preferred IVF provider for Cigna and we are confident that our patients will receive the highest quality of care at all of our locations.” About Fertility Centers of New England The Fertility Centers of New England is an international leader in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of infertility. We combine advanced reproductive technologies with a comforting, supportive environment to give patients the personal care they deserve. The Fertility Centers of New England has nine convenient locations for treatment and cycle monitoring throughout New England. We accept all insurance plans and offer a range of options for self-pay patients, including donor oocyte cycles. Patients interested in obtaining additional information about the Fertility Centers of New England may call our center at 877-877-9901 or visit us at http://www.bostonfertilitycenter.com/.

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