Zurich, Switzerland
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Wirtz T.,Center De Recherche Public Gabriel Lippmann | Fleming Y.,Center De Recherche Public Gabriel Lippmann | Gysin U.,University of Basel | Glatzel T.,University of Basel | And 3 more authors.
Microscopy and Microanalysis | Year: 2012

Extended abstract of a paper presented at Microscopy and Microanalysis 2012 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA, July 29 – August 2, 2012. © 2012, Microscopy Society of America. All rights reserved.


Sacchi M.,Synchrotron Soleil | Sacchi M.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Popescu H.,Synchrotron Soleil | Gaudemer R.,Synchrotron Soleil | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Physics: Conference Series | Year: 2013

We have designed, built and tested a new instrument for soft X-ray scattering experiments. IRMA-2 is a UHV set-up for elastic and coherent scattering experiments developed at the SEXTANTS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron. Applications will be in the field of solid state physics, with emphasis on the investigation of the magnetic properties of artificially structured materials.


Fleming Y.,Center De Recherche Public Gabriel Lippmann | Wirtz T.,Center De Recherche Public Gabriel Lippmann | Gysin U.,University of Basel | Glatzel T.,University of Basel | And 5 more authors.
Applied Surface Science | Year: 2011

With the breakthroughs in lateral resolution with regards to secondary ion mass spectroscopy in recent years, new areas of research with much promise have opened up to the scientific community. Even though the much improved lateral resolution of 50 nm can effectively deliver more accurate 3D-images, the traditional 3D reconstructions, consisting of compiling previously acquired successive secondary ion mass spectrometry images into a 3D-stack, do not represent the real localized chemical distribution of the sputtered volume. Based on samples initially analyzed on the Cameca NanoSIMS 50 instrument, this paper portrays the advantages of combining the topographical information from atomic force microscopy and the chemical information from secondary ion mass spectrometry. Taking account of the roughness evolution within the analyzed zone, 3D reconstructions become a lot more accurate and allow an easier interpretation of results. On the basis of an Al/Cu sample, a comparison between traditional 3D imaging and corrected 3D reconstructions is given and the advantages of the newly developed 3D imaging method are explained. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Wirtz T.,Center De Recherche Public Gabriel Lippmann | Fleming Y.,Center De Recherche Public Gabriel Lippmann | Gerard M.,Center De Recherche Public Gabriel Lippmann | Gysin U.,University of Basel | And 7 more authors.
Review of Scientific Instruments | Year: 2012

State-of-the-art secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) instruments allow producing 3D chemical mappings with excellent sensitivity and spatial resolution. Several important artifacts however arise from the fact that SIMS 3D mapping does not take into account the surface topography of the sample. In order to correct these artifacts, we have integrated a specially developed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) system into a commercial Cameca NanoSIMS 50 instrument. This new SPM module, which was designed as a DN200CF flange-mounted bolt-on accessory, includes a new high-precision sample stage, a scanner with a range of 100 μm in x and y direction, and a dedicated SPM head which can be operated in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy modes. Topographical information gained from AFM measurements taken before, during, and after SIMS analysis as well as the SIMS data are automatically compiled into an accurate 3D reconstruction using the software program SARINA, which was developed for this first combined SIMS-SPM instrument. The achievable lateral resolutions are 6 nm in the SPM mode and 45 nm in the SIMS mode. Elemental 3D images obtained with our integrated SIMS-SPM instrument on AlCu and polystyrenepoly(methyl methacrylate) samples demonstrate the advantages of the combined SIMS-SPM approach. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.


Wirtz T.,Center De Recherche Public Gabriel Lippmann | Fleming Y.,Center De Recherche Public Gabriel Lippmann | Gysin U.,University of Basel | Glatzel T.,University of Basel | And 5 more authors.
Surface and Interface Analysis | Year: 2013

State-of-the-art secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) instruments allow producing 3D chemical mappings with excellent sensitivity and spatial resolution. Several important artifacts, however, arise from the fact that SIMS 3D mapping does not take into account the surface topography of the sample. The traditional 3D reconstruction assumes that the initial sample surface is flat and the analyzed volume is cuboid. The produced 3D images are thus affected by a more or less important uncertainty on the depth scale and can be distorted. The situation becomes even more complicated as the topography changes during the ion bombardment. In order to correct these artifacts, we have integrated a specially developed scanning probe microscopy system into the analysis chamber of the Cameca NanoSIMS 50 at the CRP-GL. This system includes a new high-precision sample stage, a scanner with a range of 100 μm in x and y and a dedicated SPM head which can be operated in the atomic force microscopy mode. Topographical information gained from scanning probe measurements taken before, during and after SIMS analysis as well as the SIMS data are automatically compiled into an accurate 3D reconstruction using the software 'SARINA', which was developed for this first combined SIMS-SPM instrument. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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