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News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

The Food and Drug Administration approved on April 18 a handheld vagus nerve stimulation device for treating episodic cluster headaches. These “suicide headaches,” however, are only one among different chronic conditions that experts seek to address through the use of vagus nerve stimulation, which consists of sending a low electric pulse through the vagus nerve situated in the neck. In fact, a new report stated that increasing innovation in the field has led to greater knowledge of these VNS devices. For instance, patients that have resistance toward anti-epileptic drugs are being treated using the devices, while surgeons increasingly focus on minimizing the potential side effects of using the tools. GammaCore, the patient-administered handheld device for stimulating the vagus nerve, was developed by New Jersey-based neuroscience and technology firm ElectroCore. It transmits a mild electrical stimulation to the nerve through the skin, leading to pain reduction. “It does not have the side effects or dose limitations of commonly prescribed treatments or the need for invasive implantation procedures, which can be inconvenient, costly, and high-risk,” assured Dr. Stephen Silberstein, director of Jefferson University’s Headache Center in a statement. Long available in Europe, the device is applied to the neck during a headache. But while the FDA release was based on two trials, it is important to note that using the device could lead to mild, transient side effects. It should also be avoided by patients with active implantable medical devices; those with hypotension, hypertension, tachycardia (rapid heartbeat), or bradychardia (slow heartbeat); and children and pregnant women. Adjunctive vagus nerve stimulation, too, was shown to improve antidepressant effects among patients with treatment-resistant depression. “APA [American Psychiatric Association] recommends VNS as a treatment option for patients who have not responded to at least four adequate trials of depression treatments, including electroconvulsive therapy,” wrote Dr. Scott Aaronson and his colleagues. Patients who underwent VNS demonstrated improved clinical outcomes than those who received the usual treatment, including a significantly greater f-year cumulative response rate or 67.6 percent versus 40.9 percent. VNS therapy is used to help people overcome drug addiction, with the process consisting of helping the patient’s addicted brain adopt new behaviors and replace the ones linked to the need for drug intake. "When a subject is addicted to a drug, extinction is a method to help them relearn behaviors - so they are able to take different actions," said lead author and assistant professor Sven Kroener. The treatment aims to reinforce positive behavior as opposed to the drug-related one, placing the two types of behaviors in direct contradiction. When applied correctly, it could also decrease the relapse rates in drug-addicted individuals. Last year, a study found that rheumatoid arthritis patients who received VNS displayed “robust” responses. Researchers from the Feinstein Institute, SetPoint Medical, and the University of Amsterdam conducted a trial to see if a direct inflammatory reflex stimulation can minimize rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. Prior studies done on animals already showed great promise and success rates. Here, the team recruited 17 patients whose vagus nerve was surgically given a stimulation device, and then measured their response and progress for 42 days. Many of the patients whose previous rheumatoid arthritis treatments failed exhibited significant developments, according to the study. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


NEW HYDE PARK, NY - Many grandparents raising their grandchildren practice outdated health and parenting myths that could potentially pose serious risks to young children, according to illuminating new research by a Northwell Health pediatrician. The study, one of a trio led by senior investigator Andrew Adesman, MD, is scheduled for presentation at the Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting being held in San Francisco from May 6-9. Dr. Adesman, Chief of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at Cohen Children's Medical Center in New Hyde Park, focused his research on the particular difficulties facing grandparents solely raising their offspring's children. "When grandparents step up to the plate, it can be wonderful for grandchildren but can also pose challenges in terms of lifestyle, finances and mental and physical health to a somewhat older or elderly cohort," said Dr. Adesman. "In their questionnaires, a fairly large sample size of grandparents felt they were doing a good job but acknowledged they didn't have the support they often needed and that their role could be alienating in terms of their own peer group." More than 7 million grandchildren in the United States were being raised solely by their 2.7 million grandparents in 2012, according to the US Census Bureau. Factors contributing to this growing phenomenon include the opioid epidemic, parental incarceration or problems with parents' physical or mental health, Dr. Adesman said. In the decades since grandparents raised their own children, certain parenting practices and health beliefs have evolved - catching some grandparents unaware and potentially threatening their grandchildren's safety. For example, in one of Dr. Adesman's studies, "Potential Health Risks to Children When Grandparents Raising Their Grandchildren Subscribe to Out-Dated Health Beliefs," 44 percent of the 636 grandparents who completed a detailed questionnaire mistakenly believed that "ice baths are a good way to bring down a very high fever." In fact, ice baths pose a hypothermia risk. Perhaps more notably, nearly one-quarter of these grandparents did not know that "infants should be put to sleep on their back, not on their stomach or side" - a major risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Pediatricians can help grandparents raising their grandchildren by updating them on current health care beliefs and parenting methods, Dr. Adesman said. "It's important that pediatricians not make the mistake of taking for granted that because these grandparents have raised children already, they have the wisdom of the ages," he added. In his two other related studies, Dr. Adesman and his team surveyed 774 grandparents who identify as the primary caregiver of one or more grandchildren. One questionnaire aimed to characterize these grandparents' sources of support and evaluate their impact, as well as identify unmet needs for support. The study, "Adequacy of Psychosocial Supports for Grandparents Raising Their Own Grandchildren," showed that one in 10 grandparents reported they didn't have any support systems at the time they answered the survey, while an additional 12 percent said their support system didn't meet their most important needs. In addition, 71 percent reported that their parenting responsibilities had limited their ability to socialize with friends, and nearly one-third indicated that raising their grandchild had affected their spouse or relationship unfavorably. Many respondents expressed interest in receiving counseling (43 percent) or participating in a support group (61 percent), and those who lacked an adequate support system were less likely to report feeling generally happy (54 percent vs. 86 percent). "One major takeaway from this study is that for grandparents who are raising grandchildren, their parenting can often take a toll in terms of their own physical and emotional health, and support groups can make a difference," said Dr. Adesman, noting that grandparenting support groups can be found in most major cities. Dr. Adesman's remaining study, "Parenting Experiences and Self-Perceived Parenting Abilities of Grandparents Raising Their Own Grandchildren" covered parenting experiences, self-perceptions, challenges and other factors affecting these grandparents. Research showed that nearly one-third reported having a medical problem that interfered with their ability to care for their grandchild. Additionally, many said that choosing to parent their grandchild had negatively affected their own emotional (40.3 percent) or physical (32.4 percent) health. "I think pediatricians need to also evaluate not just the health and well-being of the child, but really ask about the physical and social health of the grandparent that has assumed responsibility for raising that child as well," Dr. Adesman suggested. "Because although the grandparents often elected to take on this role, it's not something they planned for and it can represent a challenge in many domains. Many grandparents are up to the challenge, but it may come with certain costs." Reporters interested in an interview with Dr. Adesman may contact him at aadesman@northwell.edu or 516-232-5229. The Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Meeting brings together thousands of individuals united by a common mission: to improve child health and wellbeing worldwide. This international gathering includes pediatric researchers, leaders in academic pediatrics, experts in child health, and practitioners. The PAS Meeting is produced through a partnership of four organizations leading the advancement of pediatric research and child advocacy: Academic Pediatric Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Pediatric Society, and Society for Pediatric Research. For more information, visit the PAS Meeting online at http://www. , follow us on Twitter @PASMeeting and #pasm17, or like us on Facebook. Northwell Health is New York State's largest health care provider and private employer, with 21 hospitals and over 550 outpatient practices. We care for more than two million people annually in the metro New York area and beyond, thanks to philanthropic support from our communities. Our 61,000 employees - 15,000+ nurses and nearly 3,400 physicians, including nearly 2,700 members of Northwell Health Physician Partners -- are working to change health care for the better. We're making breakthroughs in medicine at the Feinstein Institute. We're training the next generation of medical professionals at the visionary Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine and the School of Graduate Nursing and Physician Assistant Studies. And we offer health insurance through CareConnect. For information on our more than 100 medical specialties, visit Northwell.edu.


NEW HYDE PARK, NY- Parents choosing foods for their children are significantly more likely to purchase "health halo" products - branded to cause misleading assumptions of good nutritional value - when they only view package images and don't examine nutritional labels, according to novel new research by a Northwell Health pediatrician. The study, one of a trio led by senior supervising author Ruth Milanaik, DO, is scheduled for presentation at the Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting being held in San Francisco from May 6-9. Dr. Milanaik, Director of the Neonatal Neurodevelopmental Follow Up Program at Cohen Children's Medical Center in New Hyde Park, concentrated her studies on factors affecting children's food choices, including those parents made on their behalf and those depicted on popular children's television shows. Dr. Milanaik's research was very much a family affair: Her son, Jonathan Goldman, a student at Great Neck High School, was first author on two of the three studies, which all incorporated high school, college and medical student participation. Meanwhile, her 8-year-old son, who has diabetes, inspired a more critical eye toward factors affecting kids' food choices in both his brother and mother. Her study, "Defeating the Health Halo: Parental Food Choices for Grade-School Children," asked 1,013 parents to choose from pairs of food products in which one "health halo" item was matched with a more obviously unhealthy item with a similar nutritional label. These included pairings of Naked Smoothie vs. Coke; Oat Bites vs. Lucky Charms; and Cliff Bar vs. Peppermint Patty, among others. When given the package image and nutritional label of the same products side by side, nearly three-quarters of the parents started to question whether healthy food could be inferred from packaging alone. More than 77 percent indicated they should look at nutritional labels more carefully in the future. "Just because we believe from packaging and marketing that a product is healthy doesn't mean it really is," Dr. Milanaik said. "We have to look at nutritional labels and avoid products that have what we call the 'health halo' around them. It was a big wake-up for me as a parent of a diabetic, but also as a parent, period, to see some products I thought were intrinsically healthy not be any healthier than candy." In her two other studies, Dr. Milanaik and her team zeroed in on children's awareness of food choices. One study examined foods chosen by characters on popular children's TV shows. The other assessed how the types of food children notice on children's TV correlates with their body mass index. For the former study, "Food Consumption by Characters on Popular Children's Television Shows: Are Children Aware of Character Food Choices," the researchers analyzed 60 popular children's TV shows for depictions of characters eating food, when and why. They then asked parents of 1,800 children ages 3 through 10 about their favorite TV characters' food choices and why they seemed to be eating. Of 92 percent of shows containing food choices among characters, 59 percent of those foods were classified as "junk foods" encompassing fast food, dessert, candy and chips. Most food choices occurred while characters were "snacking not during meal times in a social setting." "On television channels aimed at children, there's been a lot of emphasis on decreasing violence, but I don't know whether they've really thought about what foods are being eaten by characters and whether they can promote a healthier eating style," Dr. Milanaik said. "Food should be something nutritious that you eat because your body is hungry. That's how we want children to view food, not as something you eat because you're bored or need something to do between meals." In the remaining study, "You Eat What You See: The Association between Foods on Popular Children's TV and Increased Body Mass Index," parents were asked to help their child recall a favorite TV character and the food he/she eats. BMI (body mass index) for each child was also calculated. While 43.5 percent of normal-weight children and nearly 43 percent of underweight children listed characters that ate unhealthy food, this proportion was higher among overweight children (54.5 percent) and obese children (49.8 percent). A closer look showed that nearly 22 percent of normal-weight children listed characters who ate dessert or treats, but this percentage rose significantly among underweight (28.4 percent), overweight (30.3 percent) and obese children (28.2 percent). Pediatricians should advise parents to limit children's TV viewing and discourage them from imitating unhealthy eating habits depicted, Dr. Milanaik said. "Physicians need to be able to take a few minutes and discuss with parents what's in a healthy diet and what should be avoided," she said. "It's very difficult - pediatricians have a lot to cover in a short visit. But I do think they should have a talk with parents about what their kids are eating, even if a child is weight-appropriate, since those choices will likely follow them into adulthood." Reporters interested in an interview with Dr. Milanaik can email her at rmilanai@northwell.edu or contact Northwell Health's press office at 516-321-6701. The Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Meeting brings together thousands of individuals united by a common mission: to improve child health and wellbeing worldwide. This international gathering includes pediatric researchers, leaders in academic pediatrics, experts in child health, and practitioners. The PAS Meeting is produced through a partnership of four organizations leading the advancement of pediatric research and child advocacy: Academic Pediatric Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Pediatric Society, and Society for Pediatric Research. For more information, visit the PAS Meeting online at http://www. , follow us on Twitter @PASMeeting and #pasm17, or like us on Facebook. Northwell Health is New York State's largest health care provider and private employer, with 21 hospitals and over 550 outpatient practices. We care for more than two million people annually in the metro New York area and beyond, thanks to philanthropic support from our communities. Our 61,000 employees - 15,000+ nurses and nearly 3,400 physicians, including nearly 2,700 members of Northwell Health Physician Partners -- are working to change health care for the better. We're making breakthroughs in medicine at the Feinstein Institute. We're training the next generation of medical professionals at the visionary Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine and the School of Graduate Nursing and Physician Assistant Studies. And we offer health insurance through CareConnect. For information on our more than 100 medical specialties, visit Northwell.edu.


Cold Spring Harbor, NY - Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has been awarded a research subcontract by Leidos Biomedical Research to lead a Cancer Model Development Center (CMDC) for pancreatic, breast, colorectal, lung, liver and other upper-gastrointestinal cancers. The project is 100% supported by U.S. federal funds (NCI Contract No. HHSN261201500003I, Task Order Number HHSN26100008). CSHL Cancer Center Director Dr. David Tuveson and CSHL Research Director Dr. David Spector will lead the multinational collaborative effort with Dr. Hans Clevers of the Hubrecht Institute, Dr. Aldo Scarpa and Dr. Vincenzo Corbo of the ARC-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer at the University of Verona, Italy, and Dr. James Crawford of Northwell Health and Dr. Peter Gregersen of Northwell's Feinstein Institute for Medical Research. The new center will generate three-dimensional organoid culture systems of cancers - next-generation models that improve upon current two-dimensional model systems used to study cancers and develop therapeutics. "CSHL is excited to lead this international team to develop more effective research models for cancer that can be shared broadly with the scientific community in order to accelerate discoveries for improved diagnosis and treatments for cancer patients," said Dr. Tuveson. Dr. Priya Sridevi from CSHL is the lead project manager for this CMDC. Under the contract, the CSHL-led CMDC will establish up to 150 organoid models in one and a half years, contributing to a larger international effort to generate 1,000 new cancer models. The Human Cancer Model Initiative (HCMI) was announced in July 2016 by the National Cancer Institute, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in the United Kingdom (UK), Cancer Research UK, and the foundation Hubrecht Organoid Technology. As part of NCI's Precision Medicine Initiative in Oncology, this new project is timed to take advantage of the latest cell culture and genomic sequencing techniques to create models that are representative of patient tumors and annotated with genomic and clinical information. This effort is a first step toward learning how to use these tools to design individualized treatments. Dr. Tuveson, the project's principal investigator, led an effort to develop pancreas cancer organoids, establishing CSHL as an instructional site offering courses in organoid development to the professional scientific community worldwide. Organoids can be established from healthy human tissue as well as from a variety of tumor tissue types. The power of the organoid is that it faithfully recapitulates the tissue from which it is derived. It can be genetically manipulated using technologies like shRNA (short hairpin RNA) that can turn genes on and off, or the revolutionary gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9. Moreover, organoid models are amenable to drug screening approaches so they can be used to validate therapeutics. The pioneer of the organoid model system, Dr. Clevers, is a key member of the new CSHL-led center. "We have laid the foundations for this collaborative program through informal exchanges of our young scientists," said Dr. Clevers. "It is very exciting that we can now turn this into a mature, well-funded endeavor that will create next-generation cancer models, as close as possible to what we find in individual patients." In support of the project, the ARC-Net team led by Dr. Scarpa and Dr. Corbo will leverage the biobanking infrastructure coordinated by Dr. Rita T. Lawlor at ARC-Net. "We are very proud to be part of this international research group," said Dr. Corbo. "This collaboration brings together world-leading expertise in cancer genomics and cancer modeling with the potential of accelerating the implementation of personalized medicine. We see an unprecedented opportunity to develop better models of cancers that will enable researchers to interrogate the wealth of genomic information available today for the rational development of cancer therapeutics." "Northwell Health and the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research are very excited to be part of this international effort, as it will help lay the foundation for new standards in clinical care that incorporate ex vivo studies of cancer tissues to guide cancer therapies," said Dr. Gregersen, Professor and Director of the Feinstein Institute's Boas Center for Genomics and Human Genetics. Dr. Crawford, Professor and Chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, noted: "Through this multi-institutional collaboration, Northwell Health will also be well-positioned to help advance the clinical trials necessary for bringing such advances into the realm of clinical care." CSHL entered into a strategic alliance with Northwell Health in April 2015, with the objective of providing CSHL researchers access to Northwell's growing network of clinical services encompassing more than 16,000 new cancer cases annually. For CSHL and Northwell Health, this CMDC project demonstrates the power of their strategic affiliation to establish closer links between research and the clinic for the benefit of cancer patients. The multinational HCMI effort aims to speed up development of new models and to make research more efficient by avoiding unnecessary duplication of scientific efforts. Genetic sequencing data from the tumors and derived models will be available to researchers, along with clinical data about the patients and their tumors. All information related to the models will be shared in a way that protects patient privacy. The goal is to give scientists around the world access to the best resources to be able to easily study all types of cancer. These new cell models could transform how we study cancer and could help to develop better treatments for patients,Scientists will make the models using tissue from patients with different types of cancer, potentially including rare and pediatric cancers, which are often under-represented or not available at all in existing cell-line collections. The new models will have the potential to reflect the biology of tumors more accurately and better represent the overall cancer patient population. The Hubrecht Institute, founded in 1916, is a research institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), situated on Utrecht Science Park "The Uithof" of the largest university in the Netherlands (Utrecht). Research at the Hubrecht Institute focuses on developmental biology and stem cells at the organismal, cellular, and molecular level. A variety of biological processes are being studied, mainly concerning embryonic development and development and homeostasis of organs. Presently there are 19 research groups, including the research group of Hans Clevers, with a total of about 220 employees. Prof. Dr. Hans Clevers discovered methods to grow stem cell-derived human epithelial 'mini-organs' (organoids) from tissues of patients with various diseases including cancer. Clevers' international reputation has brought him numerous grants and prestigious awards. For more information, visit https:/ ARC-Net, Applied Research on Cancer Network, is a university research centre that was established in 2007 through a joint initiative between the University of Verona, the University Hospital Trust of Verona and the Cariverona Foundation. ARC-Net represents Italy in the International Cancer Genome Consortium where the Centre coordinates the effort of the Italian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Project to the molecular characterization of rare pancreatic tumors. ARC-Net is organized into 5 core facilities platforms, which include a cancer tissue biobank that collects biological material and associated clinical, pathological and epidemiological data. To date the biobank has material from over 5,000 consented patients and has produced over 150 patients-derived xenografts of pancreatic cancer and other cancer models. For more information, visit http://www. Northwell Health is New York State's largest health care provider and private employer, with 21 hospitals and over 550 outpatient facilities. We care for more than two million people annually in the metro New York area and beyond, thanks to philanthropic support from our communities. Our 61,000 employees - 15,000+ nurses and nearly 3,400 physicians, including nearly 2,700 members of Northwell Health Physician Partners -- are working to change health care for the better. We're making breakthroughs in medicine at the Feinstein Institute. We're training the next generation of medical professionals at the visionary Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine and the School of Graduate Nursing and Physician Assistant Studies. And we offer health insurance through CareConnect. For information on our more than 100 medical specialties, visit Northwell.edu. Founded in 1890, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory has shaped contemporary biomedical research and education with programs in cancer, neuroscience, plant biology and quantitative biology. CSHL has been a National Cancer Institute designated Cancer Center since 1987. Home to eight Nobel Prize winners, the private, not-for-profit Laboratory employs 1,100 people including 600 scientists, students and technicians. The Meetings & Courses Program hosts more than 12,000 scientists from around the world each year on its campuses in Long Island and in Suzhou, China. The Laboratory's education arm also includes an academic publishing house, a graduate school and programs for middle and high school students and teachers. For more information, visit http://www.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Dr. Nurse's monograph on the identification of molecules that control cell division and their implications in cancer treatment will be published in Molecular Medicine MANHASSET, NY - Northwell Health's Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and Molecular Medicine announced today that the seventh Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine will be awarded to Sir Paul Nurse, PhD, director of The Francis Crick Institute. The award is in recognition of his research, which identified protein molecules that control the division (duplication) of cells in the cell cycle currently being examined as a therapy to stop or prevent cancer cell growth. Dr. Nurse's research led to the critical discovery that the protein, cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK), found both in yeast and in human genes, controls the cell cycle or cell growth process. Knowledge of the cell cycle is critical to the treatment of cancer. Most cancers are caused by the uncontrolled cell division due to damage to the controls regulating cell growth and reproduction, or by damage to how the cell replicates and grows. Leading drug companies are utilizing the understanding of the role that CDK plays in cell growth to test new therapies to stop cancer cell growth. "The Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine was established to recognize investigators who provide the crucial early knowledge that inspires further research and leads to new therapies," said Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president and CEO of the Feinstein Institute, editor emeritus of Molecular Medicine, and Cerami Award committee member. "Dr. Nurse's discovery of CDK is a fundamental advance that is now helping the development of targeted treatments for cancer." The Cerami Award, which includes a $20,000 prize, is conferred semi-annually by the editors of Molecular Medicine, a peer-reviewed, open-access journal published by the Feinstein Institute. A monograph authored by Dr. Nurse titled, "A Journey in Science: Cell Cycle Control," has been published on the Molecular Medicine website. "It is an honor to be recognized as an Anthony Cerami Award winner for my work on CDK and its impact on cancer," said Dr. Nurse. "When deciding on a course of study, it has been my belief that it is essential to tackle a significant research problem, one that if solved could make a difference. I'm happy to tell my story to inspire investigators on their path to making a difference." The Feinstein Institute is committed to celebrating the stewardship of the scientific process and imparting that perspective to young scientists. It also recognizes that the story behind making a discovery in medicine or health care should be cherished and broadly shared. The goal of the Cerami Award and its associated monographs is to document the thinking leading to such innovations and discoveries so that these stories can endure and inspire future generations of investigators. The Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine was made possible by the generosity of Dr. Cerami and the Ann Dunne Foundation for World Health. Dr. Cerami's breakthrough translational work includes the identification of anti-TNF's potential to treat a number of inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, and the development of the HbA1c Diagnostic Test, currently the gold standard for the diagnosis and control of diabetes. He is currently working on a potential treatment of diabetes as CEO of Araim Pharmaceuticals. Molecular Medicine is an open access, international, peer-reviewed biomedical journal published by The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research. Molecular Medicine promotes the understanding of normal body functioning and disease pathogenesis at the cellular and molecular levels, allowing researchers and physician-scientists to use that knowledge in the design of specific tools for disease diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention. For more information, visit molmed.org. The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research is the research arm of Northwell Health, the largest healthcare provider in New York. Home to 50 research laboratories and to clinical research throughout dozens of hospitals and outpatient facilities, the 3,500 researchers and staff of the Feinstein are making breakthroughs in molecular medicine, genetics, oncology, brain research, mental health, autoimmunity, and bioelectronic medicine - a new field of science that has the potential to revolutionize medicine. For more information about how we empower imagination and pioneer discovery, visit FeinsteinInstitute.org


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"Our collaboration with Peerbridge Health is part of our overarching strategy to introduce disruptive technologies that will help shape the future of health care delivery," said Michael Dowling, president and CEO of Northwell Health. To better understand the potential of this partnership, Peerbridge Health and Northwell conducted a clinical trial to measure the performance of the company's flagship product, the Peerbridge Cor™, a compact, lightweight, multi-channel electrocardiogram monitor. To ensure efficacy, the Peerbridge Cor was compared to other cardiovascular monitors in a clinical trial. "The trial demonstrated this technology was superior to the current Holter Monitor standard," said Nicholas Skipitaris, MD, chief of electrophysiology at Lenox Hill Hospital. "Not only did the Peerbridge Cor deliver excellent, multi-channel, analyzable data, but it delivered less motion artifact and fewer false positives, despite our patient's active New York lifestyle." "Our vision is to help consumers partner with their physicians through easily accessible remote monitoring options," said Arthur Bertolero, CEO of Peerbridge Health. "Northwell has been a strong strategic partner, sharing our passion to bring effective digital solutions to consumers and health professionals with the highest medical standard." Incidence/Cost of Cardiovascular The American Heart Association reports cardiovascular disease and stroke as the top two killers of American adults. Cardiovascular monitoring, both inside and outside medical environments, is critical for diagnosis, proper treatment, and improved outcomes. According to the US Center for Disease Control & Prevention Foundation, annual direct medical costs associated with cardiovascular diseases are projected to rise to more than $818 billion by 2030. To get ahead of the growth in patient demand, an increasing number of providers are looking for more efficient monitoring like Peerbridge to improve treatment and deliver better outcomes, which also has the potential to significantly reduce expenses. About Northwell Health Northwell Health is New York State's largest health care provider and private employer, with 22 hospitals and over 550 outpatient facilities. We care for more than two million people annually in the metro New York area and beyond, thanks to philanthropic support from our communities. Our 61,000 employees – 15,000+ nurses and nearly 3,900 physicians, including about 2,800 members of Northwell Health Physician Partners -- are working to change health care for the better. We're making breakthroughs in medicine at the Feinstein Institute. We're training the next generation of medical professionals at the visionary Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine and the School of Graduate Nursing and Physician Assistant Studies. And we offer health insurance through CareConnect. For information on our more than 100 medical specialties, visit Northwell.edu. About Peerbridge Health Headquartered in New York, NY, Peerbridge Health, Inc. (PBH) is a venture capital backed Health IT and wearable technology company. PBH seeks to improve remote monitoring through thoughtful design and a seamless user experience. The company's current focus is to bring a new freedom and precision to remote cardiac monitoring with its initial product release scheduled for 2017. The company has two digital health and fitness pioneering patents for medical grade monitoring of all vital signs; 7,979,111 and 9,101,264, with other patents pending. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/northwell-health-makes-strategic-move-into-wearable-technology-300462368.html


"It's a highly prestigious achievement to be recognized by the STS for such excellence in all three categories," said Alan Hartman, MD, senior vice president and executive director of cardiothoracic services at Northwell Health. "The superior ratings reflect the dedication, expertise and collaboration of our cardiac surgery and health care teams." The star rating system is one of the most sophisticated and highly regarded overall measures of quality in health care, rating the benchmarked outcomes of cardiothoracic programs in the US and Canada, according to the STS. The rating is calculated using a combination of quality measures for specific procedures performed by an STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Database participant. "Participating in the STS adult cardiac surgery database and its voluntary public reporting of outcomes demonstrates Northwell's commitment to quality health care improvement, and provides patients and their families with critical information to help them make the most- informed choices about their health care," said Dr. Hartman. The STS's Adult Cardiac Surgery Star Rating summary, covering data analysis for the time period ending 12/31/2016, will be made available to the public this summer on the society's website:  https://www.sts.org/ About Northwell Health Northwell Health is New York State's largest health care provider and private employer, with 22 hospitals and over 550 outpatient facilities. We care for more than two million people annually in the metro New York area and beyond, thanks to philanthropic support from our communities. Our 62,000 employees – 15,000+ nurses and about 3,900 physicians, including more than 2,800 members of Northwell Health Physician Partners – are working to change health care for the better. We're making breakthroughs in medicine at the Feinstein Institute. We're training the next generation of medical professionals at the visionary Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine and the School of Graduate Nursing and Physician Assistant Studies. And we offer health insurance through CareConnect. For information on our more than 100 medical specialties, visit Northwell.edu. About Society of Thoracic Surgeons The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) is a not-for-profit organization that represents more than 7,200 surgeons, researchers, and allied health care professionals worldwide who are dedicated to ensuring the best possible outcomes for surgeries of the heart, lung, and esophagus, as well as other surgical procedures within the chest. The Society's mission is to enhance the ability of cardiothoracic surgeons to provide the highest quality patient care through education, research, and advocacy. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sandra-atlas-bass-heart-hospital-earns-highest-quality-rating-in-cardiac-surgery-care-300462497.html


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--HealthReveal, a healthcare technology company that anticipates and mitigates adverse medical events for individuals with chronic disease, announced today a strategic investment by Northwell Ventures contributing to the Series A funding of $11.3 million. The Series A round was led by GE Ventures and joined by Greycroft Partners and Flare Capital Partners. HealthReveal partners with leading providers, payers and employers to guide patients to better health and preempt life-threatening occurrences. The company has developed a next-generation, cloud-based, decision support solution that analyzes the health of at-risk patients in real time. By using the power of evidence-based medicine and providing continual monitoring as a foundation for machine learning, health risks are detected and proactively addressed to avoid costly utilization and permanent adverse health outcomes. “We are delighted to invest in HealthReveal’s technology, which we expect will enhance their customers’ ability to combat chronic disease,” said Thomas Thornton, senior vice president and executive director of Northwell Ventures, which evaluates, develops and finances novel companies that advance Northwell’s growth and generate attractive returns. “The company brings a unique focus in deploying evidence-based medicine to assist patients and their doctors to make better and earlier decisions to optimize health.” “With Northwell as a strategic partner, we have an opportunity to ensure that incontrovertible medical knowledge is consistently and broadly applied by clinicians in providing evidence-based care,” said Dr. Lonny Reisman, the Company’s CEO and founder. “By looking at each patient personally and comprehensively we can make a meaningful improvement in clinical outcomes, medical costs and value.” HealthReveal is a healthcare technology company whose mission is to preempt the avoidable consequences of chronic disease. A fundamental component of fulfilling this mission is ensuring patients receive guideline-directed medical therapy. Patients suffering from chronic disease receive guideline-directed medical therapy only about 50% of the time1. The consequences are tragic at the individual patient level and also costly, as approximately 86% of healthcare costs per year are attributable to chronic disease2. HealthReveal partners with providers, payers and employers to continually monitor their at-risk patients and apply machine learning techniques to patient information to help avoid adverse events like strokes, heart attacks, heart failure, end stage renal disease and advanced cancer. Northwell Ventures (NV), the corporate venture arm of Northwell Health, launched a fund to invest in and actively manage companies that represent a current or future strategic interest. The NV fund seeks to identify and invest in novel technologies and business models that have the prospect to advance Northwell’s growth and generate attractive returns. The group, as a whole, works to accelerate Northwell’s broader strategic healthcare focus by utilizing Northwell as a laboratory to rapidly validate technologies, new business models, and conduct research to build profitable companies and increase the quality of care for our patients. For more information, please visit http://northwell.edu/ventures. Northwell Health is New York State’s largest health care provider and private employer, with 21 hospitals and over 550 outpatient facilities. We care for more than two million people annually in the metro New York area and beyond, thanks to philanthropic support from our communities. Our 61,000 employees – 15,000+ nurses and nearly 3,400 physicians, including nearly 2,700 members of Northwell Health Physician Partners -- are working to change health care for the better. We’re making breakthroughs in medicine at the Feinstein Institute. We're training the next generation of medical professionals at the visionary Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine and the School of Graduate Nursing and Physician Assistant Studies. And we offer health insurance through CareConnect. For information on our more than 100 medical specialties, visit Northwell.edu.

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