Federation de Microbiologie

Marseille, France

Federation de Microbiologie

Marseille, France
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Farnault L.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Zandotti C.,Federation de Microbiologie | Mallet F.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Olive D.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research
Acta Haematologica | Year: 2012

This study investigated immune recovery and the effect of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection on the early stages of T-lymphocyte recovery after cord-blood transplantation (CBT) from unrelated donors to 24 children. In addition, 15 children who were recipients of a bone-marrow transplant (BMT) were studied concomitantly. The main objectives of the study were whether lymphocytes from CBT recipients were capable of rapid qualitative differentiation in the effector memory (EM) stage, of regenerating de novo nave cells and of responding to CMV infection. Results showed that CB lymphocytes were mainly differentiated into the EM stage at 3 months and into the nave stage at 6 months. CMV infection induced a dramatic increase in CD8 but not CD4 T-cell counts, and differentiation into the EM stage with high perforin contents. Our data suggest that CB lymphocytes are capable of rapid differentiation in children, but stabilization of lymphocyte counts in children is associated with effective nave subset regeneration at 6 months. Moreover, the T-cell repertoire is capable of rapid adjustment when CMV infection occurs. © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Nougairede A.,Federation de Microbiologie | Nougairede A.,Institut Universitaire de France | Lagier J.-C.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Ninove L.,Federation de Microbiologie | And 16 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2010

Background In France, there was a reluctance to accept vaccination against the A/H1N1 pandemic influenza virus despite government recommendation and investment in the vaccine programme. Methods and Findings We examined the willingness of different populations to accept A/H1N1vaccination (i) in a French hospital among 3315 employees immunized either by in-house medical personnel or mobile teams of MDs and (ii) in a shelter housing 250 homeless persons. Google was used to assess the volume of enquiries concerning incidence of influenza. We analyzed the information on vaccination provided by Google, the website of the major French newspapers, and PubMed. Two trust Surveys were used to assess public opinion on the trustworthiness of people in different professions. Paramedics were significantly more reluctant to accept immunisation than qualified medical staff. Acceptance was significantly increased when recommended directly by MDs. Anecdotal cases of directly observed severe infections were followed by enhanced acceptance of paramedical staff. Scientific literature was significantly more in favour of vaccination than Google and French newspaper websites. In the case of the newspaper websites, information correlated with their recognised political reputations, although they would presumably claim independence from political bias. The Trust Surveys showed that politicians were highly distrusted in contrast with doctors and pharmacists who were considered much more trustworthy.Conclusions The low uptake of the vaccine could reflect failure to convey high quality medical information and advice relating to the benefits of being vaccinated. We believe that the media and internet contributed to this problem by raising concerns within the general population and that failure to involve GPs in the control programme may have been a mistake. GPs are highly regarded by the public and can provide face-to-face professional advice and information. The top-down strategy of vaccine programme management and information delivered by the Ministry of Health could have aggravated the problem, because the general population does not always trust politicians. © 2010.


Al Masalma M.,Federation de Microbiologie | Drancourt M.,Federation de Microbiologie | Dufour H.,Service de Neurochirurgie | Raoult D.,Federation de Microbiologie | Fournier P.-E.,Federation de Microbiologie
Journal of Medical Case Reports | Year: 2011

Introduction. Mycoplasma hominis is mostly known for causing urogenital infections. However, it has rarely been described as an agent of brain abscess. Case presentation. We describe a case of M. hominis brain abscess in a 41-year-old Caucasian woman following uterus curettage. The diagnosis was obtained by 16S rDNA amplification, cloning and sequencing from the abscess pus, and confirmed by a specifically designed real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Conclusions: Findings from our patient's case suggest that M. hominis should be considered as a potential agent of brain abscess, especially following uterine manipulation. © 2011 Al Masalma et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Ninove L.,Jean Moulin University Lyon 3 | Gazin C.,Federation de Microbiologie | Gould E.A.,Jean Moulin University Lyon 3 | Nougairede A.,Jean Moulin University Lyon 3 | And 5 more authors.
Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases | Year: 2010

Here we present a real-time one-step reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction SYBR Green assay derived from the method reported by van Elden and collaborators (2001) that ensures the rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective detection of both seasonal influenza A virus and emerging (H1N1) swine-origin influenza A virus (S-OIV). In addition to this screening test, which successfully detected both seasonal influenza A virus and S-OIV in human clinical samples, we showed that the probe initially designed by van Elden and collaborators could detect seasonal influenza A virus, but not S-OIV; a new probe was designed and tested that specifically detects S-OIV, but not seasonal influenza A. Both probe-based assays were validated by testing human clinical samples and specifically detected either seasonal influenza virus or S-OIV. Finally, in silico analysis of databases predicted that minor modifications of the van Elden primers would facilitate the use of this assay for the broad spectrum detection of all currently characterized variants of influenza A virus, including avian strains. © 2010, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Tan C.Y.Q.,Institut Universitaire de France | Ninove L.,Institut Universitaire de France | Gaudart J.,Aix - Marseille University | Nougairede A.,Institut Universitaire de France | And 4 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Human enteroviruses (HEV) are frequent human pathogens and, associated in particular with large outbreaks of aseptic meningitis. Here, we have compiled a database of clinical HEV isolates from the Public Hospitals of Marseille, from 1985 to 2005. Amongst 654 isolates that could be characterized by complete sequencing of the VP1 gene, 98% belonged to species HEV-B; the most frequently isolated serotypes were Echovirus E30, E11, E7, E6 and E4. The high incidence of E30 and the recent emergence of E13 are consistent with reports worldwide and peak HEV isolation occurred mostly in the late spring and summer months. The proportion of echoviruses has decreased across the years, while that of coxsackieviruses has increased. Stool (the most frequent sample type) allowed detection of all identified serotypes. MRC5 (Human lung fibroblasts) cell line was the most conducive cell line for HEV isolation (84.9% of 10 most common serotype isolates, 96.3% in association with BGM (Buffalo green monkey kidney cells)). Previous seroneutralization-based serotype identification demonstrated 55.4% accuracy when compared with molecular VP1 analysis. Our analysis of a large number of clinical strains over 20 years reinforced the validity of VP1 serotyping and showed that comparative p-distance scores can be coupled with phylogenetic analysis to provide non-ambiguous serotype identification. Phylogenetic analysis in the VP1, 2C and 3D regions also provided evidence for recombination events amongst clinical isolates. In particular, it identified isolates with dissimilar VP1 but almost identical nonstructural regions. © 2011 Tan et al.


Nougairede A.,Federation de Microbiologie | Nougairede A.,Institut Universitaire de France | Ninove L.,Federation de Microbiologie | Ninove L.,Institut Universitaire de France | And 12 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2010

Background:Within months of the emergence of the novel A/H1N1 pandemic influenza virus (nA/H1N1v), systematic screening for the surveillance of the pandemic was abandoned in France and in some other countries. At the end of June 2009, we implemented, for the public hospitals of Marseille, a Point Of Care (POC) strategy for rapid diagnosis of the novel A/H1N1 influenza virus, in order to maintain local surveillance and to evaluate locally the kinetics of the pandemic.Methodology/Principal Findings:Two POC laboratories, located in strategic places, were organized to receive and test samples 24 h/24. POC strategy consisted of receiving and processing naso-pharyngeal specimens in preparation for the rapid influenza diagnostic test (RIDT) and real-time RT-PCR assay (rtRT-PCR). This strategy had the theoretical capacity of processing up to 36 samples per 24 h. When the flow of samples was too high, the rtRT-PCR test was abandoned in the POC laboratories and transferred to the core virology laboratory. Confirmatory diagnosis was performed in the core virology laboratory twice a day using two distinct rtRT-PCR techniques that detect either influenza A virus or nA/N1N1v. Over a period of three months, 1974 samples were received in the POC laboratories, of which 111 were positive for nA/H1N1v. Specificity and sensitivity of RIDT were 100%, and 57.7% respectively. Positive results obtained using RIDT were transmitted to clinical practitioners in less than 2 hours. POC processed rtRT-PCR results were available within 7 hours, and rtRT-PCR confirmation within 24 hours.Conclusions/Significance:The POC strategy is of benefit, in all cases (with or without rtRT-PCR assay), because it provides continuous reception/processing of samples and reduction of the time to provide consolidated results to the clinical practitioners. We believe that implementation of the POC strategy for the largest number of suspect cases may improve the quality of patient care and our knowledge of the epidemiology of the pandemic. © 2010 Nougairede et al.


PubMed | Federation de Microbiologie
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European journal of epidemiology | Year: 2011

Evolution of the industrialized society had led to a risk management policy in many domains. Assessment of health care risk in the case of infectious diseases often includes mathematical models. Results of modelling were used in France to design emergency plans against flu pandemic. We believe that models cannot predict the features of the future outbreaks because the intrinsic properties of an emergent pathogen and the ecosystem in which it is developing are very complex. Of course, prediction of future outbreaks is not possible without using models, but we think that it is an illusion to presently believe that an emerging phenomenon can be anticipated by using only prediction from models. The recent pandemic caused by the novel A/H1N1 virus has confirmed the unpredictability of infectious diseases. The rapid evolution in several domains such as antimicrobial therapeutics, vaccine and hygiene conditions make comparison with past pandemics hard. The adherence of populations to prevention measures and immunisation campaigns are unpredictable. In addition, the presentation of pessimistic models is deleterious. They impress governments and provoke fears. There is a striking necessity to develop the number and the capacities of sentinel centres to take and adapt decisions based on timely available scientific information.


PubMed | Federation de Microbiologie
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2010

Within months of the emergence of the novel A/H1N1 pandemic influenza virus (nA/H1N1v), systematic screening for the surveillance of the pandemic was abandoned in France and in some other countries. At the end of June 2009, we implemented, for the public hospitals of Marseille, a Point Of Care (POC) strategy for rapid diagnosis of the novel A/H1N1 influenza virus, in order to maintain local surveillance and to evaluate locally the kinetics of the pandemic.Two POC laboratories, located in strategic places, were organized to receive and test samples 24 h/24. POC strategy consisted of receiving and processing naso-pharyngeal specimens in preparation for the rapid influenza diagnostic test (RIDT) and real-time RT-PCR assay (rtRT-PCR). This strategy had the theoretical capacity of processing up to 36 samples per 24 h. When the flow of samples was too high, the rtRT-PCR test was abandoned in the POC laboratories and transferred to the core virology laboratory. Confirmatory diagnosis was performed in the core virology laboratory twice a day using two distinct rtRT-PCR techniques that detect either influenza A virus or nA/N1N1v. Over a period of three months, 1974 samples were received in the POC laboratories, of which 111 were positive for nA/H1N1v. Specificity and sensitivity of RIDT were 100%, and 57.7% respectively. Positive results obtained using RIDT were transmitted to clinical practitioners in less than 2 hours. POC processed rtRT-PCR results were available within 7 hours, and rtRT-PCR confirmation within 24 hours.The POC strategy is of benefit, in all cases (with or without rtRT-PCR assay), because it provides continuous reception/processing of samples and reduction of the time to provide consolidated results to the clinical practitioners. We believe that implementation of the POC strategy for the largest number of suspect cases may improve the quality of patient care and our knowledge of the epidemiology of the pandemic.


PubMed | Federation de Microbiologie
Type: | Journal: Journal of medical case reports | Year: 2011

Mycoplasma hominis is mostly known for causing urogenital infections. However, it has rarely been described as an agent of brain abscess.We describe a case of M. hominis brain abscess in a 41-year-old Caucasian woman following uterus curettage. The diagnosis was obtained by 16S rDNA amplification, cloning and sequencing from the abscess pus, and confirmed by a specifically designed real-time polymerase chain reaction assay.Findings from our patients case suggest that M. hominis should be considered as a potential agent of brain abscess, especially following uterine manipulation.


PubMed | Federation de Microbiologie
Type: | Journal: Journal of medical case reports | Year: 2011

Mycetoma is a chronic granulomatous infection caused by environmental fungi or bacteria. It affects dermal and subcutaneous tissues, with putative contiguous extension to muscles or bones. While common in tropical and subtropical areas, mycetoma is rare in Europe.We describe a case of Actinomadura meyerae osteitis in a 49-year-old Caucasian woman who suffered a tibia open fracture contaminated with hay; to the best of our knowledge the first case of autochthonous A. meyerae infection reported in France. The bacterium was cultivated from a bone biopsy. Following surgical osteosynthesis and six months of treatment with cotrimoxazole, our patient made a full recovery.Our case report suggests that A. meyerae is a potential agent of wound infection in farm workers in contact with hay.

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