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Owerri, Nigeria

The Federal University of Technology Owerri is a federal government university in Owerri West Local Government area bounded by four communities of Eziobodo, Okolochi, Ihiagwa and Obinze, Imo State, Nigeria. It was one of the new universities set up by the Federal Government in June 1980 for each geo political zones, in order to increase skills, innovation and technologically oriented manpower for the technology base of Nigerian national economy. The current Vice-chancellor is Professor Chigozie C. Asiabaka. Wikipedia.


Lamina S.,Federal University of Technology Owerri
Ethiopian journal of health sciences | Year: 2013

Weight gains in pregnancy within the recommended guidelines are associated with healthy fetal and maternal outcomes; higher weight gains are associated with fetal macrosomia. This study was a systemic review of randomized controlled trials on the effect of aerobic training on maternal weight in pregnancy. The study data source was publications through May 2012 in the MEDLINE (PubMed) database. The citation lists of randomized controlled trials on the effect of aerobic training and maternal weight were extracted. Data on participants' characteristics, study quality, population, intervention, treatment outcome (maternal weight gain) were collected and analyzed. There were 11 randomized controlled studies using body weight (kg) as measure of treatment outcome. A total of 1177 subjects were recruited in the 11 studies. The mean± SD weight gain (kg) for the exercise (11.31± 7.44kg) and control (14.42± 6.60kg) groups; Meta-analysis result indicated significant effect of aerobic training on maternal weight (t= -7.580, p= .000) at p< 0.05. It was concluded that aerobic training is an effective tool in maternal weight gain control in pregnancy. More randomized controlled trials are warranted. Source


Lamina S.,Federal University of Technology Owerri
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research | Year: 2011

The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of interval and continuous training program on blood pressure and serum uric acid (SUA) levels in subjects with hypertension. Three hundred and fifty-seven male patients with mild to moderate systolic blood pressure (SBP) between 140 and 179 and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) between 90 and 109 mm Hg essential hypertension were age-matched and grouped into interval, continuous, and control groups. The interval (work:rest ratio of 1:1) and continuous groups were involved in an 8-week interval and continuous training program of 45-60 minutes, at intensities of 60-79% of heart rate maximum, whereas the control group remained sedentary during this period. SBP, DBP, maximum oxygen uptake (̇VO2max) and SUA concentration were assessed. One-way analysis of variance and Scheffe and Pearson correlation tests were used in data analysis. Findings of the study revealed significant effect of exercise training program on ̇VO 2max, SBP, DBP, and SUA. However, there was no significant difference between the interval and continuous groups. Changes in ̇VO2max negatively correlated with changes in SUA (r = 20.220) at p < 0.05. It was concluded that both moderate-intensity interval and continuous training programs are effective and neither seems superior to the other in the nonpharmacological management of hypertension and may prevent cardiovascular events through the downregulation of SUA in hypertension. Findings of the study support the recommendations of moderate-intensity interval and continuous training programs as adjuncts for nonpharmacological management of essential hypertension. © 2011 National Strength and Conditioning Association. Source


Ilo-Okeke E.O.,Chiyoda Corporation | Ilo-Okeke E.O.,Federal University of Technology Owerri | Byrnes T.,Chiyoda Corporation
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2014

We introduce a theoretical framework for single-shot phase contrast imaging (PCI) measurements of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Our model allows for the simple calculation of the quantum backaction resulting from the measurement, and the amount of information that is read out. We find that there is an optimum time Gτ∼1/N for the light-matter interaction (G is the ac Stark shift frequency, N is the number of particles in the BEC), where the maximum amount of information can be read out from the BEC. A universal information-disturbance tradeoff law εFεG1/N2 is found where εF is the amount of backaction and εG is the estimation error. The PCI measurement can also be found to be a direct probe of the quantum fluctuations of the BEC, via the noise of the PCI signal. © 2014 American Physical Society. Source


Lamina S.,Federal University of Technology Owerri
Journal of Clinical Hypertension | Year: 2010

The purpose of the present study was to determine and compare the effect of interval and continuous training programs in the management of hypertension. Three hundred fifty-seven male patients with essential hypertension were age matched and grouped into interval, continuous, and control groups. The interval (n=140; 58.90±7.35 years) and continuous (n=112; 58.63±7.22 years) groups were involved in 8 weeks of interval (60%-79% maximum heart rate) and continuous (60%-79% maximum heart rate) programs of between 45 to 60 minutes, while the control group (n=105; 58.27±6.24 years) remained sedentary during this period. Findings of the study revealed significant effect of both training programs on maximum oxygen consumption, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure at P<.05. The maximum oxygen consumption significantly and negatively correlated with systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, rate-pressure product, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure at P<.01. It was concluded that both training programs are effective adjunct nonpharmacological management of hypertension. The recommendation of the paper was that both interval and continuous training programs should form part of the kit in the management of hypertension. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.. Source


Iroezindu M.O.,Federal University of Technology Owerri
Nigerian journal of medicine : journal of the National Association of Resident Doctors of Nigeria | Year: 2012

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and malaria co-infection has become an important public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Data on HIV and malaria interaction in Nigerian adults is scanty. We determined the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia in HIV-infected adults and further investigated the role of immune status in the HIV/malaria association. This was a cross-sectional study involving 100 newly-diagnosed HIV-infected adults and 100 age and sex-matched HIV negative controls. Malaria parasitaemia was diagnosed by blood film microscopy using Giemsa staining technique and was defined as the presence of malaria parasites irrespective of species or parasite density. HIV infection was confirmed by western blot assay and CD4 T-lymphocyte count of the HIV-infected patients was quantified by flow cytometry. The prevalence of malaria parasitaemia was higher in HIV-infected adults (24%) than in the controls (9%) (chi2 = 8.17, p = 0.04). Participants residing in rural areas had higher prevalence of malaria parasitaemia than urban dwellers both for HIV-infected patients (34.1% Vs. 16.1%, chi2 = 4.3, p = 0.04) and controls (18.4%, Vs. 6.5%, chi2 = 3.4, p = 0.04). HIV-infected male patients tended to have malaria parasitemia more than their female counterparts (33.3% Vs. 17.2%, chi2 = 3.4, p = 0.06). Among HIV-infected patients, the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia progressively increased at lower CD4 cell counts, 10.3% for CD4 cell count of = 500, 17.5% for 200-499 and 45.2% for < 200 cells/microL (chi2 = 11.5, p = 0.003). HIV is likely to fuel malaria infection in tropical countries where both diseases are endemic. Malaria control practices should be further intensified in HIV-infected populations. Source

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