Federal Polytechnic

Kaura Namoda, Nigeria

Federal Polytechnic

Kaura Namoda, Nigeria
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

-- Pastor Hyacinth I. Ukwuagu wrote The Third Covenant of God to explain God's sacred mission to teach and sanctify humanity. To establish His New Kingdom, God must change humanity's unrighteousness to righteousness, judge the world, and ultimately unite the whole world in love and peace.Whenever Man's sins reach a crisis stage and the world is on the verge of destruction, God, in His infinite mercy and magnanimity, intervenes to save mankind. It was never His intention to let the people of the world perish. But when God's past covenants are broken, He must renew those covenants with the third covenant, which is the last hope for humanity to rid the world of evil.As it says in 1st Corinthians 15:53, "For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality."States the author, "The salvation of the human race is my major concern and motivation."He believes this is the last chance for man's salvation from God, for now is God's last physical manifestation on earth. It is said in the Scripture, "As it happened in the days of Noah, so shall it happen again."Watch the video at: https://youtu.be/ a2hJNKLGHPc About the Author: Hyacinth I. Ukwuagu was born in Imo State, Nigeria, and is a pastor of the Brotherhood of the Cross and Star (BCS), ordained by the Sole Spiritual Head of the Universe, Leader Olumba Olumba Obu. Pastor Ukwuagu holds a BS in economics and an MS in management. He was previously senior lecturer at Federal Polytechnic, Idah, Nigeria, and executive secretary of education authority of the Orlu Local Government Council in Imo State, Nigeria. He held various positions at state and national levels in the BCS. Married with six children, he is currently an independent business owner in Houston, Texas."This important book on God's will shows the continuing fight to save mankind from itself. We are pleased to announce its release," said Robert Fletcher, CEO of Strategic Book Publishing and Rights Agency.THE THIRD COVENANT OF GOD WITH HUMANITY: GOD NOW DWELLS AMONG MEN TO MANIFEST HIS WILL ON EARTH AS IN HEAVEN (ISBN: 978-1-62857-556-9) is now available for $18 and can be ordered through the publisher's website: http://sbprabooks.com/ HyacinthIUkwuagu or at www.amazon.com or www.barnesandnoble.com.WHOLESALERS:This book is distributed by Ingram Books and other wholesale distributors. Contact your representative with the ISBN for purchase. Wholesale purchase for retailers, universities, libraries, and other organizations is also available through the publisher; please email bookorder@sbpra.net.Strategic Book Publishing and Rights Co, LLCwww.SBPRA.net (http://www.strategicbookclub.com/)www.AuthorMarketingIdeas.com    www.PublishOnDemandGlobal.com*About our book publishing, marketing, and distribution team … We have provided services to over 10,000 authors around the world in the last eight years. We have hybrid-published over 6,500 authors, (about 500+ in a "traditional style" contract and the remainder in a self-publishing style), and their books are for sale in all the normal Ingram distribution channels, and Amazon and B&N (US, UK, Australia, Europe), plus China, India, Malaysia and almost every country in the world. We have attended and exhibited at over 30 of the largest book fairs in the world including London, New York, Beijing, Frankfurt, Guadalajara, New Delhi, Taiwan, and more. We have been instrumental in the adoption of POD in mainland China and Korea. For our author-clients we have produced over 1,000 press releases, video book trailers and other marketing materials for authors around the world. We have created over 7,500 author websites with extended capabilities, we have over 1,200 multi-format eBooks available on Kindle, Apple, Kobo, and other eBook platforms around the world. We look forward to assisting you to the best of our ability.https://www.facebook.com/sbpra.ushttp://pinterest.com/sbpra/https://twitter.com/SBPRAhttps://www.linkedin.com/company/sbpra


Umoh E.A.,Federal Polytechnic
IEEE International Conference on Adaptive Science and Technology, ICAST | Year: 2015

In this paper, we study the antisynchronization by adaptive controllers, of a generalized multi-wing butterfly attractor design template using the four-wing (n=1) structure as a case study. It was assumed that the parameters of the response system are not available for measurement while the two systems are identical. The direct coupling of the sawtooth wave functions of the identical systems with appropriate tuning of the gain coefficients of the adaptive nonlinear controllers resulted to the antisychronized trajectories of the drive and response systems in two-dimension space. Simulation results show that the chaotic regimes achieved antisychrony while the error and parameter error systems asymptotically stabilized in finite time in the sense of Lyapunov. © 2014 IEEE.


Adeoti O.,Federal Polytechnic | Ayelegun T.A.,Federal Polytechnic | Osho S.O.,Federal Polytechnic
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews | Year: 2014

This paper estimates Nigeria biogas potential from livestock manure and its contribution to climate change mitigation. Findings reveal that Nigeria biogas potential from livestock manure represents a minimum of 1.62×10 9 m3 of biogas per annum. Replacing diesel fuel with methane derived from biogas to produce electricity as well as inorganic nitrogen fertilizer with organic nitrogen from the anaerobic digester for agricultural use will lead to carbon dioxide (CO2) emission savings of 683,600 t per annum. This amount represents the minimum contribution of biogas derived from livestock manure to climate change mitigation if harnessed for electricity and agricultural use in Nigeria. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Makanjuola O.M.,Federal Polytechnic
Advance Journal of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2012

In the recent years, research efforts in the developing countries have been geared towards the improvement of protein quality foods using blends of legume and cereal which is considered a nutritionally balanced product. Therefore, this present study is aimed at finding local substitute for milk based product with high protein content of a well balancing amino acid composition and high digestibility; determining the proximate composition, microbial analysis as well as sensory evaluation of soy-corn yoghurt with a view of knowing the consumer acceptability of the product. Yoghurt samples were produced from blends of soymilk and corn milk (yellow maize corn) using Streptococcus thermophillus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus as starter cultures. Ratio of soy milk to corn milk were 80%:20%; 70%:30% and 100% soymilk as control. The yoghurt samples produced were coded A, B and C representing 100% soy yoghurt, 80%:20% soy corn yoghurt and 70%:30% soy corn yoghurt respectively. Yoghurt samples were subjected to chemical, microbiological and organoleptic assessment. The results of chemical analysis revealed protein contents of 4.30, 4.00 and 3.70% respectively for the samples. Fat contents varied between 2.10 and 2.60%, while ash contents of 0.50, 0.60 and 0.62% were obtained for the samples respectively. Total solids of between 10.98 and 8.80% were obtained with titratable acidity of 0.03, 0.05 and 0.06%, respectively. The carbohydrate contents of the samples ranged from 1.40 to 4.50% while all the samples showed fairly acidic levels. Water contents of between 89.00 and 91.20% were obtained. The microbiological examination revealed a tolerable level for all the samples. © Maxwell Scientific Organization, 2012.


Umoh E.A.,Federal Polytechnic
Proceedings of the 2nd Pan African International Conference on Science, Computing and Telecommunications, PACT 2014 | Year: 2014

The YU-WANG autonomous chaotic system is a three-dimensional system that possesses a quadratic cross-product and a hyperbolic nonlinear term in its system equations. The resulting complex dynamics formed by these nonlinearities can be manipulated to evolve two- and four-wing attractors which form intricate attractors with distinct dynamic properties. This paper presents the synchronization of the system with identical and non-identical hyperbolic nonlinear terms using hybrid feedback control techniques. The results of the various simulations show that the coupled systems are mildly susceptible to varying hyperbolic nonlinearities using the synchronization scheme. However, the folding trajectories are highly sensitive to parametric perturbation in the controller-deactivated architecture of the original system.. The synchronized signals holding possibilities of applications in secure communication system modelling and design. © 2014 IEEE.


Umoh E.A.,Federal Polytechnic
Proceedings of the 2nd Pan African International Conference on Science, Computing and Telecommunications, PACT 2014 | Year: 2014

A heuristic tuning of a Fuzzy Controller to examine the limits of gains that assures a unique control law for stabilization of a Rucklidge chaotic system is presented in this paper. The Rucklidge system is one of the paradigms of chaos that holds possibilities of applications in secure communication schemes and electrical power distribution systems where two identical or hybrid systems can be antisynchronized or synchronized for signal masking over public channels and power outage minimization and control. In this work, a low-cost and less rigorous fuzzy controller tuning strategy is presented where the controller output gain coefficients are tuned within a given bounds to produce unique solutions with better settling times in the context of state vectors stabilization problems. The strategy is less tedious when compared to other tuning methods used for controllers in some chaotic and non-chaotic systems. The approach has been validated on other chaotic systems to be robust for a class of chaotic system control. © 2014 IEEE.


Oje O.J.,Federal Polytechnic | Sule W.F.,Osun State University | Famurewa D.,Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti
Viral Immunology | Year: 2012

There are few studies on health-facility based prevalence rates for dual hepatitis B virus-hepatitis C virus (HBV-HCV) infection on a state-wide scale in Nigeria. In this study we determined the state-wide prevalence rate of dual positivity of hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-HCV antibody among hospital patients of Ekiti State, Nigeria, and identified associated factors. Consenting apparently-healthy patients visiting health centers in all local government area (LGA) headquarters of Ekiti State were consecutively selected to a total of 2000 individuals. Patient demographic data pertinent to HBV and HCV transmission were obtained using a structured questionnaire. Subsequently, serum samples prepared from the aseptically collected blood was tested for the presence of both HBsAg and anti-HCV antibody using DiaSpot test strips. The results were analyzed using binary logistic regression. Dual positivity of 7.40% was recorded among the study participants, with 9.80% and 12.80%, respectively, testing positive for HBsAg and anti-HCV antibody. The study patients were, however, most likely to be anti-HCV antibody positive. Nine of the 10 factors studied were independently associated with dual positivity. Five of these, in descending order of odds ratio, were: illiteracy (15.76, p=0.001); having ≥4 sexual partners (9.46, p=0.001); age range of 35-44 y (8.46,p=0.001); farming (7.33, p=0.001); and not at all to use of condoms during sexual intercourse (4.39, p=0.001). The dual positivity rate was relatively high, with unprotected sexual intercourse as the most probable mode of acquisition of HBV and HCV by the seropositive study participants. © 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Umoh E.A.,Federal Polytechnic
Proceedings of the 2012 IEEE 4th International Conference on Adaptive Science and Technology, ICAST 2012 | Year: 2012

The presence of noise generally degrades the control environment in any dynamic process. However, the role of noise in a chaotic system presents some engaging possibilities. The effect of modelled noise on stabilization of a chaotic dynamic system is reported in this paper. The noise was modelled as a lumped process and added to the system input. The Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model was used to model a chaotic Lorenz system. Lyapunov stability criteria were used to test for system stability in the presence of the added noise. Numerical simulation results show that the highly aperiodic and corrupted trajectories can be stabilized in the sense of Lyapunov, individually and globally © 2012 IEEE.


Umoh E.A.,Federal Polytechnic
2nd International Conference on Emerging and Sustainable Technologies for Power and ICT in a Developing Society, IEEE NIGERCON 2013 - Proceedings | Year: 2013

Chaotic systems are extremely sensitive to perturbations in their system dynamics leading to unpredictability of their evolution in time scale. This extreme sensitivity can be exploited for fast tuning of Fuzzy Controller output signals to attain asymptotic stability in the sense of Lyapunov, while preserving the uniqueness of the control law. This paper investigates the bounds of feasible regions for heuristic tuning of a Fuzzy Controller output scaling factor to achieve local asymptotically stable trajectories of a Lorenz chaotic system based on the Lyapunov stability criteria. Numerical simulations of the closed-loop system using MATLAB® software shows that the heuristic tuning approach is less time consuming and equally establishes the regions of controllability and stabilizability of the Controller based on the observed system responses. © 2013 IEEE.


News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: www.sciencemag.org

Cheap materials called perovskites are insinuating themselves into silicon solar cells—a first step toward ultimately usurping the reigning cell material. Last week, at a meeting here of the Materials Research Society (MRS), researchers announced that “tandem” cells, in which perovskites are layered on top of silicon and other photovoltaic materials, have achieved record-setting efficiencies at turning sunlight into electricity. Now, researchers are moving fast to surmount the lack of durability and other problems that have hindered the commercialization of perovskites. “I think perovskites are going to make it to market,” says Aslihan Babayigit, a perovskite researcher at Hasselt University in Diepenbeek, Belgium. The progress has been “amazing,” adds David Cahen, a materials scientist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel. “Even if all the problems are not solved, most look solvable.” Known since the 1830s, perovskites are a class of crystals with a common 3D structure. It wasn’t until 2009 that researchers in Japan first realized their potential as a photovoltaic material. The first perovskite devices converted only 3.8% of light energy into electricity, far less than crystalline silicon, today’s dominant commercial technology, which tops out at 25.3% efficiency for the best research cells. (Commercial cells usually vary between 16%–20%.) But researchers tinkered with their perovskite recipes, and the efficiencies of the cells quickly skyrocketed. The record now stands at 22.1%, demonstrated earlier this year by researchers in South Korea. Tandems, which combine cells optimized to capture different parts of the solar spectrum, can do even better. Silicon, for instance, preferentially absorbs reddish light, whereas perovskites tend to soak up blue and green photons. Slapping a perovskite cell on top of silicon need not cost much because the ingredients are dirt cheap, and the crystals can be grown easily at low temperatures. Tandems also allow perovskites to piggyback on the entrenched silicon industry. At the MRS meeting, Michael McGehee, a materials scientist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, reported that by growing a perovskite on silicon, he and his colleagues had created a tandem cell with an efficiency of 23.6%, better than the efficiencies of either component. Another group led by Christophe Ballif of the Federal Polytechnic School of Lausanne in Neuchâtel, Switzerland, reported in July that a silicon-perovskite tandem with a more complex architecture had reached an efficiency of 25.2%. Tandems are likely to continue improving for years. Researchers have yet to build in all the finer tricks of the trade, such as optimizing the electricity-carrying layers in the cells and adding coatings that minimize surface reflections. Even with current perovskite materials, over the next couple years silicon-perovskite tandems could reach efficiencies of 30%, McGehee predicts. At that threshold, says Henry Snaith, a physicist at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, solar companies will start to add perovskites into their commercial panels, driving further improvements in the materials that could ultimately help them supplant silicon altogether. At the MRS meeting, some researchers foreshadowed that day. Giles Eperon, a materials scientist at the University of Washington in Seattle, explained that when getting his Ph.D. at Oxford, he made a perovskite that strongly absorbs reddish light—the wavelengths that silicon has specialized in. Partnering with McGehee’s group, Eperon layered his red absorber on top of a more standard blue absorber, achieving an efficiency of 20.3% in a pure perovskite tandem. Although not yet as good as perovskite-silicon tandems, the perovskite components in the cells are still rapidly improving, whereas silicon has flatlined. For all their gains in efficiency, perovskites have faced lingering problems. Water vapor, high temperatures, or even prolonged sun exposure can dissolve or degrade perovskites within hours. But at the MRS meeting, McGehee reported exceptional stability for new perovskite recipes that replace an organic component called methylammonium with formamidinium or the element cesium. When encapsulated to protect them from moisture, these cells showed no sign of degradation for 6 weeks, even when exposed to temperatures of 85°C and a relative humidity of 85%, a standard test of durability. “Panels that pass it usually will not fail due to heat and humidity over 25 years outside,” McGehee says. Others are reporting improvements in manufacturing commercial-sized cells rather than the small, bespoke crystals used for setting records. Christopher Case, the chief technology officer for Oxford Photovoltaics (Oxford PV) in the United Kingdom, a perovskite solar cell company launched by Snaith, says the company has scaled up the postage stamp–sized research cells to ones that are 10 centimeters square and that have passed industry durability standards. Last month, the company acquired a former photovoltaic pilot facility in Germany. It is now gearing up to produce perovskite cells atop full-sized commercial silicon wafers, 15 centimeters on a side, Case says. Oxford PV also recently announced that they raised an additional £26 million ($33 million) over the last 18 months from investors, and Case says the company has inked partnerships with several of the top 10 silicon solar cell producers to investigate adding perovskites to their cells. If all goes well, he says, the first pilot products could appear in 2018. That leaves safety as the major outstanding roadblock to commercialization. The most efficient perovskites contain a highly soluble form of lead, a dangerous neurotoxin that could leach into homes, soil, or groundwater if the cells degrade. Babayigit says there are potential solutions, such as encapsulating the perovskite in protective shells or adding sulfides around the cell, which would bind and quarantine any lead that managed to escape. For now, she says, “it’s a heavily underresearched field that needs attention.” Given how quickly perovskites are moving to market, it’s a safe bet that someone will soon take on the project. For more related coverage visit our topic page on energy.

Loading Federal Polytechnic collaborators
Loading Federal Polytechnic collaborators