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WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Wilkinson Barker Knauer, LLP is pleased to announce that Sean Conway has joined the firm. Sean brings over six years of communications regulatory experience, both in private practice and in various roles at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Sean began serving at the FCC as Attorney Advisor in the Wireline Competition Bureau, where he was one of the lead drafters in a rulemaking proceeding to modernize the E-rate program. He also served as Legal Advisor in the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, advising on policy matters in the wireless industry, including competition, accessibility, licensing, and spectrum use issues. Most recently, he had been Deputy Director in the Office of Legislative Affairs at the FCC. Prior to his time at the FCC, Sean was an attorney at Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, as a member of the policy and regulatory practice group, where he represented clients before Congress, the FCC, the Federal Trade Commission, and other regulatory agencies. He has also worked as an attorney for Sol Systems LLC, advocating before state utility commissions, and as a legal fellow for the Hillary Clinton for President Exploratory Committee. From 2004 to 2006, Mr. Conway was a legislative aide for then Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton. While attending law school at the University of Virginia, Sean was the Executive Editor of Virginia Law Weekly and actively involved in student organizations. He received a B.A. in history and government from The College of William & Mary, graduating magna cum laude and competing as a Division I Track & Field athlete. He is actively involved in the DC community, coaching a Special Olympics DC basketball team. Bryan Tramont, Managing Partner of Wilkinson Barker Knauer, said, “We are excited to have Sean on Team WBK, where his government and private sector experience, intellect, penchant for teamwork, and can-do attitude will fit nicely with the culture of the firm. As an added bonus, it is also widely expected that he will significantly lower the average mile time on the WBK road running team.” Mr. Conway commented, “WBK has a stellar reputation as a great place to work, and it has a dynamic and thriving telecommunications practice. I look forward to joining the team.” Wilkinson Barker Knauer, LLP, one of the largest law firms in the nation dedicated primarily to the practice of communications and energy law, is ranked as a “first tier” firm by Chambers USA (Telecom, Broadcast, and Satellite: Regulatory), and Legal 500 (Telecoms and broadcast: regulatory), and was twice named “Law Firm of the Year” in communications law by U.S. News - Best Lawyers (2012 & 2014). The firm, with offices in Washington, D.C. and Denver, Colorado, advises clients ranging from global Fortune 100 companies to small start-ups in regulatory, transactional, privacy, consumer protection, intellectual property, corporate and litigation matters involving all aspects of communications and energy law, at both the state and federal levels. Mr. Conway is resident in the firm’s Washington, D.C. office and can be reached at 202-383-3412 and at SConway@wbklaw.com. Additional information about Mr. Conway can be found at http://www.wbklaw.com/Our_Team/Sean__Conway.


News Article | February 4, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Samsung may be gearing up for the launch of a new device in the U.S. as the company has filed for a trademark at United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for the brand name "Galaxy J7 Sky Pro." The request has already been accepted by the USPTO and an examining attorney will be assigned within three months of filing. The has been no further information about the device other than the official filling which can be seen on USPTO's website. It is unclear how this device is going to be different from the Samsung Galaxy J7 or why the moniker "Sky Pro" has been used in the brand name. Tech enthusiasts are not even sure if the name belongs to a smartphone, but given that the name says Galaxy J7 it may be safe to assume that "Sky Pro" is a variant of the smartphone. There have been speculations of Samsung launching the Galaxy J7 (2017) in U.S. via carriers like Verizon, U.S. Cellular and AT&T. Now rumors are rife that Samsung may plan to launch Galaxy J7 (2017) under the name Galaxy J7 Sky Pro. The Galaxy J7 (2017) has already surfaced on Geekbench, which is a benchmarking website, and even prior to that some renders of the device have been leaked online. The smartphone has been granted the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) certification as well. A few days ago, the Galaxy J7 (2017) was also spotted on GFXBench. While nothing has been officially confirmed by Samsung, some specifications and features of the Galaxy J7 (2017) leaked out after the handset appeared on Geekbench and more recently GFXBench. Previous and recent leaks suggest that the device may sport a 5.5-inch display with a resolution of 1280 x 720 pixels. While both the benchmarking sites reveal that the Galaxy J7 (2017) may come with 2 GB of RAM, there are contradictory reports regarding its processor. The Geekbench listing notes that the rumored smartphone will house a Snapdragon 625 processor, whereas the recent GFXBench listing shares that the handset will come with an Exynos 7870 CPU. Previous leaks also suggest that the battery fueling the handset will be a 3000 mAh one. It seems that the Galaxy J7 (2017), which is the successor of the Galaxy J7 (2016), may be launched as the Galaxy J7 Sky Pro in the U.S. in the near future. Only once Samsung launches the Galaxy J7 Sky Pro the mystery will be solved. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.techradar.com

This feature has been brought to you by IPVanish This is a follow-up to the story ‘How Trump’s Cybersecurity Quest May Reshape the Internet’. President Trump has been vocal about his fondness for mass online surveillance; "I want surveillance of these people," he announced in reference to Muslim Americans during his campaign. According to Edgar, it may not be as difficult to implement such surveillance as one might think. In his essay, Edgar explains: “If Trump decides to build a great firewall, he may not need Congress. Section 606 of the Communications Act of 1934 provides emergency powers to seize control of communications facilities if the president declares there is a ‘war or threat of war’ or ‘a state of public peril.’” In 2010, a Senate report concluded that Section 606 ‘gives the President the authority to take over wire communications in the United States and, if the President so chooses, shut a network down.’ With a signature, the former reality television star could invoke it. Section 606 has never been applied to the internet before, but there is no law stating that it cannot be. Edgar adds, “If Trump wants to ‘close that internet up,’ all he will need is an opinion from his Attorney General that Section 606 gives him authority to do so, and that the threat of terrorism is compelling enough to override any First Amendment concerns.” While on the surface it may seem that Trump champions protecting the people with cybersecurity, he doesn’t seem to grasp the concept of online freedom. “We have to talk ... about, maybe in certain areas, closing that internet up in some way,” he stated at a rally in South Carolina during his campaign. He also warned that "certain things will be done that we never thought would happen in this country,” such as policies that "were frankly unthinkable a year ago." It is this kind of minatory rhetoric that seems to show Trump’s true colours, and frighten those who believe that the right to personal privacy from the government should not be limited to the physical. At least Donald Trump’s stance on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and net neutrality are crystal clear, though it still comes with glaring discrepancies. Net neutrality — the idea that internet service providers (ISPs) should not restrict access to, favour, or block certain content or services delivered online — was brought about in the early 2000s by Columbia University media law professor, Tim Wu. Issues concerning net neutrality had been practically nonexistent until 2014 when FCC Chairman, Tom Wheeler, proposed a plan that would have allowed internet giants like AT&T, Verizon, and Comcast to create “pay-to-play” fast lanes. But Americans spoke out, causing Wheeler to throw out his original proposal and release new net neutrality rules based on Title II of the Communications Act, which would regulate broadband as a public utility and put internet users’ protection as the number one priority. Still, net neutrality has not come without backlash from Congress, the courts, and now the incoming President. Trump is seeking to reverse the Obama administration's policies concerning net neutrality and loosen the regulations that govern ISPs and data. He advocates for reclassifying broadband from a public utility like electricity or water to an information service, and charging it as such. Supporters of the previous administration want to prohibit paid prioritisation and blocking because it would be bad for consumers, whereas supporters of the incoming administration believe that this kind of broadly-offered service would benefit business. Trump plans to expedite this process as soon as he takes office, which means we could be witnessing a widely discriminatory internet very soon. Some of the most pressing items on the conservative President’s to-do list are to replace FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, and to end the FCC’s involvement in the telecommunications market. This decision to replace Wheeler has been supported by The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF), a nonprofit public policy think tank in Washington D.C., who believe that the FCC overstepped its boundaries when it changed broadband regulations. “A Trump-appointed FCC chair has a chance to fix that mistake,” stated Robert Atkinson, ITIF President. But by cutting the FCC out of internet regulation altogether, privacy oversight of ISPs would fall to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC); and instead of having the FCC regulate the behaviour of users or determine what is unfair or deceptive, the responsibility falls on trade groups in different industries.  The FCC released rules in October of 2016 that allowed broadband users “increased choice, transparency, and security over their personal data." These rules would automatically be nullified if the 2015 FCC’s TCPA Declaratory Ruling and Order is thrown out. So, with laxer regulations and an FCC that does not oversee internet regulation, results will likely include higher internet and cable bills, worse customer service, and fewer, less varied choices for service. With laxer regulations, it will also easier for cable and phone companies to mine the browsing habits of and other information relating to customers in order to target ads. Many companies have already expressed excitement over Trump’s reduced regulation plan, like Verizon, who has been attempting to build a digital ad-business to compete with Google and Facebook but has been met with recent privacy rules that require them to ask for customers’ permission before using their data. While it remains unseen whether Donald Trump will actually put an end to net neutrality as we know it, the threat still looms over us. Without net neutrality, access to certain web services may be manipulated by local cable and phone companies. Matt Wood, policy director for the public-interest group Free Press, stated that “Internet providers could use subtle tactics and behind-the-scenes manoeuvres to change people's behaviour and make more money,” and many consumers could see a decline in the number and variety of services offered, and an increase in prices. While these kinds of alterations could lead to a censored internet where information is not so free, provide the best way to combat this. While Trump does not seem to have a very firm grasp on modern technology, he has promised tech leaders that his administration will continue to support the furthering of new technologies and support their innovations every step of the way. As President-elect, Trump met with various tech leaders to discuss job creation, innovation, free trade, and cybersecurity. Representatives from Google, Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, Amazon, Oracle, and Cisco were in attendance, however, one innovator was notably missing. Twitter CEO, Jack Dorsey, did not receive an invitation to meet with Trump, a snub which struck many as odd considering the conservative’s frequent and controversial use of the micro-blogging platform. Despite the threats to online privacy and internet freedom that have been made apparent in Donald Trump’s rhetoric, it’s been proven time and time again that he cannot always be held at his word. We can only hope that the new administration puts the right policies and practices in place that will protect the integrity of our online environment and put an end to privacy threats before they even begin. Even with hope, it is imperative that the American people do not take the issues of online privacy lightly.  What matters most now, is that President Donald J. Trump’s powers to survey and control the internet do exist. The people of America must prepare themselves for “turnkey tyranny,” as Edward Snowden put it in his first interview — and the fact that some new leader, someday, may “find the switch.”


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Samsung is all ready to address the world with a range of new products on Feb. 26 at its Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2017 press event in Barcelona, Spain. With few days to go, one may have expected the rumors pertaining to the launch of Samsung devices to come to a halt. However, the flow doesn't seem to cease at all as another rumor about a Samsung device has popped up. The device in question is the Galaxy Book, a Windows 10-powered tablet. The latest rumor comes from MSpoweruser which chanced upon a new app, which at the launch of a Windows 10-powered Samsung tablet that will come with an S Pen stylus in tow. The publication spotted a new app called Book Settings, which has made its way to the Windows Store. The app made for Samsung Electronics Co, Ltd. revealed the existence of a Samsung tablet which may be called the Galaxy Book. Apart from sparking rumors that Samsung may launch a Windows 10-powered tablet, the app revealed that the tablet may likely come with an S Pen stylus, just like the impending Galaxy Tab S3. The stylus would also be supporting the Air Command functionality. For the unfamiliar, Samsung's Air Command allows a user to access many other features in the tablet with the help of the S Pen stylus. One simply has to hover the stylus over the screen and then tap the S Pen button. Once the Air Command gets activated, the user is presented with various options like Smart Select, Screen Write and Samsung Notes. The app description in the Windows Store specifically states that it has been designed for "Galaxy Book" and "may not function normally on other devices." The rumored Samsung tablet may run on LTE as stated by the app, which weighs approximately 13.32 MB. If the Galaxy Book tablet indeed gets launched at MWC, it may well be the third tablet in the lineup given that Samsung may also unveil the Galaxy Tab S3 and Galaxy TabPro S2 at the trade show. The Galaxy TabPro S2 is also rumored to be a Windows 10-powered tablet, albeit bigger in size than the Galaxy Book. Previous rumors hinted that Galaxy Book may rock a 10.2-inch screen and may feature Samsung's Smart Dimming feature.  Another Samsung tablet codenamed SM-W627received Federal Communications Commission (FCC) certification a few weeks ago. It is being guessed that SM-W627 and Galaxy Book are the same device. The FCC listing showed that the tablet dubbed the Galaxy Book may come with 4G LTE connectivity, a keyboard, as well as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth support. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Leader in GDPR-compliant technology to be the headline partner of the acclaimed event recognizing trailblazing data-driven executives, including UK Information Commissioner SEATTLE, WA and LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM--(Marketwired - Feb 8, 2017) - autoGraph, the leaders in marketing AI for General Data Protection Regulations, announced today it will be the exclusive sponsor for the DataIQ 100 in 2017. As the headline partner of the February 23 event in London, autoGraph CEO and 2016 DataIQ 100 honoree Henry Lawson will open the ceremony with an address alongside David Reed, DataIQ Director of Research and editor-in-chief, and UK Information Commissioner, Elizabeth Denham. This year's DataIQ 100, the third-annual event of its kind, will once again assemble and honor the cross-industry community of game-changing data and analytics leaders at large and mid-market organizations. A key area of focus at this year's event will be General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR), an area in which autoGraph is leading the industry as the only software with the ability to ensure brands are GDPR-compliant in their targeted marketing efforts. "DataIQ 100 is a much-admired event that recognizes the most powerful and influential data professionals representing global brands," says Lawson. "With GDPR being a focal topic of discussion at the ceremony, we wanted to be heavily involved as a sponsor this year to engage and lead the data compliance conversations amongst the best and brightest data executives." This year's DataIQ 100 will notably feature GDPR initiatives taking place in Europe and the influence of those regulations are having on a global scale with Federal Communications Commission (FCC) also addressing its data privacy protocols. The consequences for brands not being GDPR-compliant upon the regulations being enacted in May of 2018 will be severe, although this is also an opportunity for brands to engage and gain the trust of their customers on a deeper level. Implementations of autoGraph have demonstrated marketing consent by customers increases up to 75 percent for brands due to the engaging and customer-centric focus of the platform. The participation of luminaries like Denham at the event demonstrates the growing prominence of data protection and the need for compliance as GDPR approaches in 2018. "GDPR will be here quicker than you think. And while there's a lot in there you'll recognize from the current law, make no mistake, this one's a game changer for everyone. We're talking about a 21st century approach to the processing of personal data. We're all going to have to change how we think about data protection," stated Denham. With autoGraph's passion toward developing technology solutions to be GDPR and FCC compliant, involvement at the highest level at the prestigious event as DataIQ 100 recognizes executives impacting the data industry in the following categories: "We associate the sponsor of our event with an elite business that is significantly impacting the data industry," said Adrian Gregory, CEO of DataIQ. "autoGraph is an innovative company at the forefront of GDPR strategies. Seeing an opportunity to introduce executives to a solution that will quickly enable their company to become compliant with the regulations made autoGraph the ideal partner for this year's DataIQ 100." To learn more about autoGraph, please visit www.autograph.me. About autoGraph autoGraph® enables brands to build trust and deliver dynamic customer experiences through the User Generated Profile platform. User Generated Profiles are a patented technology that unlocks consumers' motivations, desires and aspirations. User Generated Profiles define new and unique audiences within a brand's own customer base, and empower consumers to share latent and expressed preferences to brands to deliver emotional, hyper-personalized connections across all digital touch-points. autoGraph is the first to provide a patented technology to generate first party consumer permissions & consent that is in line with EU General Data Protection Regulations and US Federal Communications Commission. autoGraph serves its global client base across retail, media, telecommunications and financial services. autoGraph is based in Seattle, WA and London, and is venture capital-backed by Voyager Capital and Rally Capital. Follow autoGraph on LinkedIn and Twitter. Email queries to info@autograph.me


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

The Multifamily Broadband Council (MBC), which represents small, independent communications companies that provide broadband-related services to multifamily communities and their vendors, has filed two petitions with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) challenging Article 52 of the San Francisco Police Code. In the first petition, MBC seeks a declaratory ruling that Article 52 is fully preempted by federal law and policy and thus is invalid. In the second petition, MBC seeks a ruling that the ordinance is barred by the FCC’s Over-The-Air-Reception Devices (OTARD) rules and an immediate suspension of Article 52. Article 52 threatens competition and consumer value, while advancing the interests of only well-heeled behemoths like Google, which has shown a willingness to lose hundreds of millions of dollars on its Google Fiber deployments in order to destroy its smaller competitors. Subject to only limited exceptions, Article 52 imposes an extreme form of mandatory access to multiple occupancy buildings, trampling on basic property rights and contract law. The ordinance requires property owners to permit all communications service providers onto their property at an occupant’s request, and to permit these providers to use the property owner’s existing wiring even if another provider is already using it. This mandate applies regardless of whether the property owner has an existing contract with other communications service providers already serving the property. Under the guise of increased consumer choice, Article 52 tips the scales against small businesses, will line the pockets of multinational corporations, and will in fact negatively impact broadband competition. The following statement can be attributed to MBC’s President, Dan Terheggen: “The FCC should not be fooled by Article 52’s pro-competitive wrapping paper. At its core, Article 52 is nothing more than a gift to well-financed players like Google. The rule tilts the playing field against small, entrepreneurial start-ups such as MBC’s members by overriding the voluntary contractual arrangements necessary for these companies to obtain the financing required to invest in innovative and competitive services for consumers. Ultimately, Article 52 will lead to less investment in broadband deployment and less consumer choice as bulk discounts are eliminated and affordable competition from innovative start-ups evaporates. Indeed, the negative consequences of this ordinance will include higher prices for lower- and fixed-income tenants, poor customer service, endless litigation, and a reduction of meaningful broadband competition in San Francisco. But Article 52 isn’t just deeply flawed policy – it also violates the letter and spirit of the FCC’s rules regarding inside wiring and other matters, and is in direct conflict with the FCC’s rule governing consumer choice in antenna placement (known as the “OTARD” rule). Accordingly, we are asking the FCC to intercede and reject the ordinance as inconsistent with the OTARD rule and preempted by federal law and policy. We are hopeful that the FCC will act quickly to restore a level playing field in San Francisco and prevent the spread of such ordinances to other cities.” For further information, please contact MBC’s Executive Director, Valerie Sargent, at (949) 274-3434 or vsargent@mfbroadband.org.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

ARLINGTON, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Federated Wireless announced today that its spectrum controller has been granted conditional certification from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). This is a significant step that signals to operators that they can begin trials with the Federated Wireless solution, and a step that leads to full certification expected in the second quarter of this year. The Federated Wireless solution unlocks a spectrum of possibilities by breaking down barriers to wireless spectrum, giving greater access to operators by creating a shared model for what was previously individually licensed. The certification cements Federated Wireless’ first mover status and allows it to provide operators with highly efficient and secure access to spectrum resources, when they need it. “The FCC’s conditional certification of our spectrum controller demonstrates solid momentum in the shared spectrum market as we transition from defining a concept to developing market-ready solutions that give operators of any size a flexible and cost-effective option for accessing wireless spectrum,” said Iyad Tarazi, CEO of Federated Wireless. “This market is growing at an unprecedented pace. All four major US operators have joined the Citizens Broadband Radio Service (CBRS) Alliance. The standards are in place, and FCC certification is poised to begin. We are excited to be part of making the FCC’s vision a reality. Our spectrum controller allows a monumental transformation in wireless spectrum to be realized, enabling a new wave of innovation and business models to be created.” In today’s wireless-reliant world, spectrum is finite and quickly running out. In fact, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) predicts the number of devices connected to mobile networks worldwide will grow tenfold by 2020, from 5 billion to 50 billion, further straining spectrum and presenting greater issues. The economy needs better allocation and a solution that will facilitate multiple operators coexisting and leveraging spectrum. Federated Wireless’ spectrum controller allows spectrum to be allocated as needed, eliminating the need for operators to purchase entire bands of dormant spectrum, which is a lengthy process with high acquisition costs of up to billions of dollars. By enabling spectrum to be effectively allocated, managed and optimized, the spectrum controller allows a shared model to be created on the 3.5 GHz band, which was recently unlocked by the FCC. The spectrum controller is a 100 percent cloud-based solution that eliminates the need for specialized hardware. A robust set of APIs and patented machine learning and spectrum management algorithms simplify CBRS deployments, helping businesses to improve both time-to-market and time-to-revenue while decreasing development costs. Federated Wireless offers standardized subscription costs no matter the size of the organization, ensuring operators only pay for the capacity used. Federated Wireless has been a pioneer in preparing the 3.5 GHz band for commercial use, working closely with the United States Department of Defense and the FCC, and co-founding the CBRS Alliance, an organization focused on developing the 3.5 GHz ecosystem. The conditional certification milestone comes after five years of leading the creation of the shared spectrum market, developing necessary standards and ensuring customer deployments can be successful in all markets. Federated Wireless has completed trials and demonstrations with a number of companies, including Alphabet, Nokia, Ruckus Wireless, SpiderCloud Wireless, Siemens, Telrad and Airspan, among others. The spectrum controller is currently undergoing trials for a variety of applications with more than two dozen operators and equipment vendors. Federated Wireless is on track to reach full regulatory approval from the FCC in the first half of 2017 and plans to have commercial customers by the end of 2017. Federated Wireless is unlocking a spectrum of possibilities by breaking down barriers to wireless spectrum, giving greater access to operators by creating a shared model for what was previously individually licensed. Headquartered in Arlington, Virginia, Federated Wireless is an influential first mover in the industry that has spent the last 5 years leading the creation of the shared spectrum market from the ground up, developing and nurturing the necessary standards, and working to ensure that customer deployments can be successful in all network environments. More information can be found at www.federatedwireless.com.


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Huawei, which is less than a week away to launch its flagships at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2017, seems to be favored by the rumor mill as there is yet another leak pertaining to its flagship smartphone Huawei P10. The Huawei P10 has been in news recently, not only because of the frequent leaks, but also the promotional teaser launched by the company on Feb. 14. The teaser confirmed to the world that Huawei's P10 would indeed be launched on Feb. 26 at the MWC. The recent leak obtained by AusDroid from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) website gives people a peek into the innards of the upcoming Huawei flagship. The images were in the documents submitted by Huawei to FCC to obtain approval for the smartphone's U.S. release. The first image shows off the front and back renders of the Huawei P10. However, the second image shows the internals of the handset. The prototype of the Huawei P10, as evidenced in the leaked renders, are kept between two rulers, which gives one an idea about the length and width of the upcoming smartphone. As the phone shown in the pictures sports a flat display, it would be safe to assume that the handset is Huawei P10 and not Huawei P10 Plus. One can reach at this conclusion as earlier rumors suggested that the Huawei P10 Plus may sport a 5.5-inch curved edge display, whereas the smaller sibling Huawei P10 will have a 5.2-inch flat display. The images of the handset that show off the internals, reveal that Huawei won't be embedding a fingerprint sensor on the back panel of its upcoming flagship smartphone. Instead, the company may have decided to conceal the fingerprint sensor in the physical Home button , located on the front panel of the smartphone. The images also show that the phone may come with a removable battery, changeable back covers, a 3.5 mm headphone jack and also a USB port Type-C. The 5.2-inch flat screen Huawei P10 is rumored to house an octa-core Kirin 960 processor along with a Mali-G71 MP8 graphics processing unit (GPU). The handset is expected to come pre-loaded with Android 7.0 Nougat with Huawei's customized Android skin EMUI 5.0 on top. Users can expect 4 GB of RAM and 64 GB of internal memory on Huawei P10 although chances of higher configurations cannot be rolled out. There is also a possibility that both the Huawei P10 and P10 Plus maybe come in different storage and RAM options to cater to the varying budgets and requirements of different customers. Huawei P10 is scheduled to get launched at MWC 2017 on Feb. 26 at the company's press event. Rumors suggest that the handset would not hit the market until March and may start at $500. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Huawei has been in the news recently for a mixed number of reasons - be it the expected launch of rumored Huawei P10 at the MWC 2017 or the arrest of its executives for leaking confidential information to LeEco. Now a new development has taken place and suggests that the company has a new smartphone in the pipeline. A mysterious Huawei device codenamed MYA-L03 has been spotted on Geekbench. The MYA-L03 is speculated to be a budget friendly smartphone from the company and has cleared the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) certification on Dec. 28, 2016. The date is listed on a FCC document which is available for viewing on the FCC website. Various reports suggest that the mysterious device could be named "Huawei Maya." According to the Geekbench listing, the Huawei MYA-L03 is expected to come pre-loaded with Android 6.0 Marshmallow and may be powered by a quad-core MediaTek MT6737T CPU, clocking at 1.44 GHZ. The rumored smartphone may house 2 GB of RAM and has a single-core-score of 658 and a multi-core-score of 1815, according to the listing. The FCC filing, on the other hand, discloses a similar model under the name MYA-L23. The FCC listed model is a dual-SIM smartphone whereas the Huawei device spotted on Geekbench will house only a single SIM. The MYA-L23 is speculated to have 2920 mAh battery, 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi, and will be supporting 4G/LTE (bands 2, 4, 5, and 7). The FCC cleared smartphone is also expected to come packed with the Bluetooth option. Going by the picture in the FCC filing, the device may come with a replaceable back cover option to satisfy the growing demand of changeable colorful back plates. A closer look at the picture reveals microSD card slot and a SIM slot in the device. The rear camera is located on the upper portion with the LED flash on its left. Huawei will most likely place its brand name on the back panel of the upcoming smartphone. The company is trying its best to get a strong foothold in the ultra-affordable smartphone market in the U.S. Rumors suggests that the mysterious Huawei smartphone may cost anything between $100 to $150. Huawei has a press event slated for Feb. 26 and it remains to be seen if the mysterious Huawei Maya will be introduced at the upcoming event. Since the smartphone has been given the green signal by the FCC, the handset will make its way to the U.S. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


PARIJS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Actility, leider in energiezuinige netwerken met groot bereik, heeft vandaag bekendgemaakt dat Tom Wheeler is toegetreden tot de directie van het bedrijf. Wheeler was onder president Obama voorzitter van de Amerikaanse autoriteit voor telecommunicatie, de Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Hij is een gepassioneerd voorstander van internetsystemen die de productiviteit verhogen. Wheeler ziet de toegevoegde waarde van Web 3.0 vooral terug in sensoren die alle sectoren nuttige informatie verschaffen, waardoor bedrijven in staat zijn hun werkwijze te verbeteren. Commercieel succes is zodoende niet meer afhankelijk van het doelgericht aansturen van content voor consumenten. De aanstelling van Wheeler laat zien dat Actility vastberaden streeft naar een leidersrol in de toekomst van Web 3.0.

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