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News Article | May 13, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

TORONTO/FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Businesses around the world scrambled on Saturday to prepare for a renewed cyber attack, convinced that a lull in a computer offensive that has stopped car factories, hospitals, schools and other organizations in around 100 countries was only temporary. The pace of the attack by a destructive virus dubbed WannaCry slowed late on Friday, after the so-called "ransomware" locked up more than 100,000 computers, demanding owners pay to $300 to $600 get their data back. "It's paused but it's going to happen again. We absolutely anticipate that this will come back," said Patrick McBride, an executive with cyber-security firm Claroty. Symantec predicted infections so far would cost tens of millions of dollars, mostly from cleaning corporate networks. Ransoms paid so far amount to only tens of thousands of dollars, one analyst said, but he predicted they would rise. Companies rushed to protect Windows systems with patches that Microsoft released last month and on Friday. WannaCry exploited a vulnerability to spread itself across networks, a rare and powerful feature that caused infections to surge on Friday. Code for exploiting that bug, which is known as "Eternal Blue," was released on the internet in March by a hacking group known as the Shadow Brokers. The group claimed it was stolen from a repository of National Security Agency hacking tools. The agency has not responded to requests for comment. The identity of the Shadow Brokers is not known, though many security researchers say they believe they are in Russia, which is a major source of ransomware and was one of the countries hit first and hardest by WannaCry. Cyber security experts, who have been on watch for months for an "Eternal Blue"-based attack, said on Saturday that they expect the computer code to be used in types of cyber attacks beyond extortion campaigns, including efforts to seize control of networks and steal data. Governments and private security firms on Saturday that they expect hackers to tweak the malicious code used in Friday's attack, restoring the ability to self-replicate. Those expectations prompted businesses to call in technicians to work over the weekend to make sure networks were protected with security updates needed to thwart Eternal Blue. "It's all hands on deck," said Shane Shook, an independent security consultant whose customers include large corporations and governments. Guillaume Poupard, head of France’s national cyber security agency, told Reuters he is concerned infections could surge again on Monday, when workers return to the office and turn on computers. The U.S. government on Saturday issued a technical alert with advice on how to protect against the attacks, asking victims to report attacks to the Federal Bureau of Investigation or Department of Homeland Security. Security software maker Avast said it had observed 126,534 ransomware infections in 99 countries, with Russia, Ukraine and Taiwan the top targets. Security experts said that they were not sure how many victims would pay the ransoms, or if access to computers was being restored after such payments. Elliptic, a private security firm that investigates ransomware attacks, said that only about $32,000 had been sent to bitcoin addresses listed by the extortionists in ransom demands that flashed on screens of infected computers. "We expect this number to increase significantly over the course of the weekend," said Tom Robinson, lead investigator at Elliptic. That is far below what it is likely to cost companies to recover from such attacks. Symantec researcher Vikram Thakur said that total repair costs are likely to be in the tens of millions of dollars. "The expensive part is the clean up of the machine and restoring the encrypted data," he said. Still, such figures do not account for lost production at firms like Renault, which on Saturday said it had halted stopped manufacturing at plants in Sandouville, France and Romania to prevent the spread of ransomware in its systems. Among the other victims is a Nissan manufacturing plant in Sunderland, northeast England, though a spokesman said "there has been no major impact on our business." Hundreds of hospitals and clinics in the British National Health Service were infected on Friday, forcing them to send patients to other facilities. On Saturday, Interior Minister Amber Rudd said that 97 percent of the nation's health service trusts were "working as normal."


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump on Thursday ran into resistance for calling ousted FBI chief James Comey a "showboat," an attack that was swiftly contradicted by top U.S. senators and the acting FBI leader, who pledged that an investigation into possible Trump campaign ties to Russia would proceed with vigor. In his first interview since firing Comey on Tuesday, Trump appeared to try to underscore that Comey's dismissal was about his performance at the Federal Bureau of Investigation and not about the Russia probe. Trump faces accusations from Democrats that he fired Comey to hinder the FBI investigation into U.S. intelligence agency allegations that Russia meddled in the 2016 presidential election to benefit Trump. The probe has hung over Trump's presidency since he took office in January and threatens to overwhelm his policy priorities. "He's a showboat. He's a grandstander," Trump told NBC News. "The FBI has been in turmoil. You know that, I know that, everybody knows that." Trump's characterization was odds with that of the top Republican and Democratic lawmakers on the Senate Intelligence Committee. At a hearing on Thursday, the Republican chairman of the panel, Richard Burr, and the top Democrat, Mark Warner, praised Comey. Warner said he was offended at Trump's remarks. Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe, testifying in place of Comey, contradicted Trump's appraisal of turmoil at the FBI, saying Comey had "broad support" from the rank and file "and still does to this day," McCabe said. Officials familiar with internal FBI politics said Trump's action has hurt morale and would make it hard to attract and retain staff. Trump had been expected to soon visit FBI headquarters, but MSNBC reported that plan had been thrown out after agency officials told the White House that Trump would not be greeted warmly following his firing of Comey. Former Republican Representative Mike Rogers is being considered as a candidate to replace Comey, a senior White House official said. The nominee must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate. McCabe promised to tell senators of any White House meddling into the agency's probe on Russia. Democrats have called for a special counsel to look into the matter. "It is my opinion and belief that the FBI will continue to pursue this investigation vigorously and completely," McCabe told the senators. Moscow has denied interference in the election and the Trump administration denies allegations of collusion with Russia. Trump said in the NBC television interview that he never pressured Comey into dropping the FBI probe, adding: "If Russia did anything, I want to know that." Trump said there was no "collusion between me and my campaign and the Russians," but that "the Russians did not affect the vote." His explanation of why he fired Comey ran counter to previous administration explanations of Comey's dismissal. The White House and Vice President Mike Pence had said Trump fired Comey on the recommendation of Attorney General Jeff Sessions and No. 2 Justice Department official Rod Rosenstein. On Thursday, Trump said he would have taken the action regardless. "I was going to fire Comey. My decision," Trump said. "I was going to fire regardless of recommendation." Rosenstein, who met privately with some senators on Thursday, was invited to brief all 100 senators next week, Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said. Schumer said he hoped that Sessions would also speak to senators separately on the firing of Comey. In the House of Representatives, Justin Amash, a Republican member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, said on Twitter that he had signed onto Democratic-sponsored legislation calling for an independent, bipartisan commission to probe Russian meddling in last year’s U.S. election campaign. U.S. intelligence agencies concluded that Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered an effort to disrupt the election that included hacking into Democratic Party emails and leaking them, with the aim of helping Trump. Leaders of the U.S. intelligence agencies, including Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats and CIA chief Mike Pompeo, testified to the senators on Thursday that they agreed with that finding. Trump, in his interview, also gave further details of his account that Comey had told him on three separate occasions that he was not under investigation in the Russia matter. Trump said he had asked Comey once over dinner and twice by telephone. "I said: 'If it's possible, would you let me know, am I under investigation?'" Trump told NBC. "He said: 'You are not under investigation.'" Trump said the dinner with Comey was at the White House and Comey wanted to discuss staying on as FBI chief. "We had a very nice dinner. And at that time, he told me: 'You are not under investigation.'" White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said she believed it was not a conflict of interest for a president to ask the FBI chief such a question. Comey has not publicly discussed any conversations he had with Trump. At the Senate hearing, McCabe testified it was not typical practice to tell people they were not a targets of an investigation. Republican chairman Burr asked McCabe whether he ever heard Comey tell Trump the president was not the subject of investigation. McCabe sidestepped the question, saying he could not comment on an ongoing probe. Warner, the top Democrat on the panel, said it was "hard to avoid the conclusion" that Trump's firing of Comey was related to the Russia investigation. "And while it's clear to me now more than ever that an independent special counsel must be appointed, make no mistake our committee will get to the bottom of what happened during the 2016 presidential election," Warner said.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

This combo of images taken Wednesday, May 10, 2017, shows top row from left: Tom Stump of Hamburg, Pa.; Cheri Zettel of Dallas and Mary Smith of Schenectady, N.Y., and bottom row from left, Robin Pickens of St. Louis; Harding Aslinger of Chattanooga, Tenn.; and Charles Martin, of Oklahoma City. Opinions on President Donald Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey are dividing along familiar partisan lines: Republicans and Trump supporters see it as necessary, while Democrats view it with suspicion. (AP Photo) Recent events in the nation's capital have many Americans feeling like they're riding a never-ending political roller coaster. Less than a week after House Republicans voted to dismantle Barack Obama's signature health care law, President Donald Trump abruptly fired FBI Director James Comey. Then, on Wednesday, Trump met with Russia's top diplomat amid ongoing FBI and congressional investigations of Russian meddling in last year's presidential election and possible contacts between the Trump campaign and Russia. As voters processed the latest news out of Washington they remained divided along party lines with Republicans and Trump supporters seeing Comey's dramatic firing as necessary and Democrats viewing it with suspicion. 'HE'LL GET RID OF THEM' Ronnie Vaca, a 36-year-old who works in the biotechnology industry, said he disagrees with Trump's decision to fire Comey and thinks it's a cover-up to keep investigators from uncovering evidence of Russian interference in the presidential election. "If he doesn't get the answer he wants, he'll get rid of them and put in someone who gives him what he's looking for," said Vaca, an Army veteran from Orange County, California, who voted for Hillary Clinton. Harding Aslinger, a 70-year-old retiree who was visiting St. Louis's Gateway Arch from Chattanooga, Tennessee, called Comey's firing "necessary for the betterment of the government." Aslinger said he has "total confidence" in the president and his administration. IT'S NOT THE 'FEDERAL BUREAU OF PROSECUTION' Financial adviser John Carey said he thinks Comey should have resigned or been fired last July for overstepping his bounds in the investigation into Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's emails. The 65-year-old from Kansas City, Missouri, said he believes Comey should have turned the facts over to the Department of Justice, rather than stating his own opinions about the case. "It's the Federal Bureau of Investigation, not the Federal Bureau of Prosecution," said Carey, who didn't vote for president last year. Amber Jordan, a 34-year-old marketing director from Little Rock, Arkansas, said she thinks personnel changes are to be expected with any new administration. She didn't think anyone, Comey included, should be surprised by Trump's decision. "He doesn't like to work with people who don't like to work for him," she said. Jordan expected Comey would be fired, but said the way Trump announced the termination was akin to how someone would be dismissed on the reality TV show "The Bachelor." "You don't just fire someone live on the air," Jordan said. "That's not the way the president should handle things. Oklahoma City bookstore owner Charles Martin supported Hillary Clinton in November, but he's tried to remain hopeful during the Trump presidency. But Trump's latest move has him worried. Firing the FBI director amid an ongoing investigation into possible contacts between the Trump campaign and Russia is un-American and something expected in a "strong-arm regime," said Martin, 40. "What is unsettling about this is it looks like we might be getting to the end of what's been a national embarrassment and starting to approach the cusp of a national tragedy," Martin said. "Ten years down the road, are we going to be looking back at this as, 'I can't believe that this was a thing that we did — how funny?' Or is this going to be, 'Wow this is where it all started falling apart?'" 'WE NEED TO KNOW' Like other Clinton supporters, Cheri Zettel found the timing of Comey's firing suspicious because of the Russia probe. She wants a special prosecutor to take over the investigation. "They may find nothing, and that's fine too. But we need to know," she said. Zettel, 57, of Dallas, said the U.S. "can't have constant influence in our elections, or we've lost our democracy." She added: "I'm not thrilled that Comey had so much influence on our election ... but nobody was looking at firing him when it was all about Hillary Clinton." IT HAPPENED 'AT SUCH A VULNERABLE TIME' Mary Smith, a retired homemaker and registered independent who voted for Hillary Clinton, said she's still trying to make sense of it all. "I don't understand it," said Smith, 71, of Schenectady, New York, as she waited at the Albany airport. "It seems at such a vulnerable time when he's trying to investigate the Russian connection to Flynn, that this action would be taken."


A simple tweak could unlock the Web for millions of people. The letters to the right of the dot in a URL look harmless, but for many users they’re a barrier. In 2011, the International Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers decided to grow the number of top-level domains from 12 to 1,200, including some that use non-Latin characters. But that revealed a problem: many applications simply don’t recognize those new characters. Our own Mike Orcutt explains how a simple tweak could change that and help millions of people use the Internet more effectively. Get The Download! Sign up here to have it delivered free to your inbox. With James Comey out at the FBI, American privacy could take a hammering. Donald Trump’s decision to fire James Comey as director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation is causing consternation. But what will it mean for tech? Comey has historically been in opposition of widespread use of encryption—most famously during the Apple-FBI battle over unlocking the San Bernardino iPhone. But as Recode’s analysis points out, Donald Trump could appoint an even more militant replacement who is happy to dramatically expand government surveillance powers. Facebook’s new translation AI is ultra-efficient. The social network has a new machine learning approach to help you read posts in other languages. But while it's only marginally more accurate than a system announced by Google last fall, Facebook’s learns nine times faster because it considers whole sentences at a time, rather than words one after the next. Wired reports that the advance will soon be rolled out to the social network’s 1.8 billion users, where it will form part of Facebook’s quest to build the perfect chabot. "We think of censorship as denying information to people, but that’s a very limited, 20th Century way of looking at it." — Zeynep Tufecki, an associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and author of Twitter and Teargas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest, describes some of the difficulties facing modern activism.


News Article | May 13, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

U.S. President Donald Trump waves before delivering keynote address at Liberty University's commencement in Lynchburg, Virginia, U.S., May 13, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump on Saturday is set to deliver the commencement address - his first as president - to Liberty University, the nation's largest Christian college, where he is expected to find to a friendly audience after a week of turmoil in Washington. Trump has been closeted in the White House all week, making only a few, brief public appearances after he took the highly unusual and fraught step of abruptly firing James Comey as FBI director on Tuesday. Dismissing the head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation at a time when the agency probes alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 election has sparked criticism of presidential overreach and overshadowed Trump's push to boost jobs through tax reform and a massive infrastructure program. On Saturday, Trump told reporters traveling with him on Air Force One that he wants to move quickly to nominate a new FBI director to replace Comey, saying he may be able to make his decision before he leaves for his first foreign trip later next week. The college in Lynchburg, Virginia should provide a receptive crowd for Trump. He campaigned there during his run for office and was bolstered by the endorsement of its president, Jerry Falwell Jr., who helped secure support from religious conservatives. "He's going to tell them what he wants to do to make their careers run more smoothly and make it easier for them to raise families," Falwell told WDBJ7, a CBS television affiliate in Roanoke, Virginia, about Trump's message to graduates. "I've been working with his speech writers and I think he's going to deliver a wonderful speech that will be personal to Liberty," Falwell said in the interview. Trump has expressed frustration that the Russia probe has loomed over his presidency. He insisted this week that he fired Comey over his performance, not because of the investigation, but the timing of the dismissal and his comments afterward have raised alarms with his critics. Trump, who has been preparing for his first foreign trip to the Middle East and Europe late next week, also will deliver the commencement address to the United States Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut, on Wednesday. "To young Americans at both schools, I will be bringing a message of hope and optimism about our nation’s bright future," Trump said in his weekly address to the nation. Trump will encourage students to "be a force for good in the world by standing up for the values that Liberty has taught them," White House spokesman Sean Spicer said. Liberty University said it expects more than 7,000 of its 18,000 graduates to participate in the ceremonies, most of whom earned their degree online. Past commencements have attracted as many as 40,000 people, the college said.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.technologyreview.com

James Comey was no fan of encryption on consumer devices. But now that he's been fired as director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, whoever comes next is likely to be even worse for anyone favoring a right to digital privacy and freedom from government surveillance. President Donald Trump’s decision to show Comey the door, while nominally a result of his handling of the Clinton e-mail debacle, is widely believed to be an attempt to stall an ongoing investigation, spearheaded by Comey, into the Trump administration’s ties with Russia. If that is the case, it’s unlikely to work, argues Wired. But regardless of the Trump’s motivations for the decision and the surfeit of potential repercussions for his political situation, one thing is clear: the FBI will need a new director. And Trump could use the opportunity to install someone with an even more militant take on encryption and privacy than Comey. Historically, Comey has been in opposition of the widespread use of encryption. That view was aired most publicly during the Apple-FBI battle over the unlocking of an iPhone used during a terrorist attack in San Bernardino, California, in 2015. And more recently, at a Senate hearing, he admitted that he “could imagine a world that ends up with legislation saying: if you are going to make devices in the U.S., you figure out how to comply with court orders.” For what it’s worth, Comey might be right. As we’ve argued, smartphones that lock away every shred of information could inhibit law enforcement far more than we really want, however unpalatable the prospect of the FBI rifling through your device is. Of course, the long-simmering tussle between technology firms and the government about federal access to encrypted data was all but predestined to flare up again under the Trump administration. But the empty seat at the top of the FBI could now be filled by someone who is able to push Comey’s line even harder. As Amie Stepanovich, a policy manager at a surveillance reform public-interest group called Access Now, said to Recode, Trump has “consistently appointed officials that support gross expansions of government authority at the expense of individual rights.” She added that people may be right to be “worried about who Trump is going to recommend for that position.” Indeed, Jeff Sessions, Trump’s attorney general, reckons that it is “critical that national security and criminal investigators be able to overcome encryption.” Meanwhile Mike Pompeo, his CIA director, has written that “the use of strong encryption in personal communications may itself be a red flag" for terrorism. Who exactly will take the reins at the FBI remains to be seen. But their stance on encryption and surveillance is relatively easy to predict.


News Article | May 13, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The FBI Agents Association (FBIAA), representing over 13,000 active duty and retired Agents, urges President Donald Trump to nominate former House Intelligence Committee Chairman and FBI Special Agent Mike Rogers to serve as the next Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). "Chairman Rogers exemplifies the principles that should be possessed by the next FBI Director,” said FBIAA President Thomas F. O’Connor. “It is essential that the next FBI Director understand the details of how Agents do their important work. Mike Rogers’ background as a Special Agent, veteran of the armed forces and former member of Congress sets him apart as someone capable of confronting the wide array of challenges facing our help ensure that the Bureau remains the world’s premiere law enforcement agency. “Rogers’ unique and diverse experience will allow him to effectively lead the men and women of the Bureau as we work to protect our country from criminal and terrorist threats,” said O’Connor. “During his time in Congress he showed a commitment to confronting threats to our country in a nonpartisan and collaborative manner.” O’Connor set forth principles for the selection of a new Director that are supported by the thousands of FBIAA-member Agents across the country. The four principles include: “Agents are essential to the Bureau’s primary mission of protecting our country from a wide array of threats ranging from street gangs and mortgage fraud to cyber-espionage and foreign and domestic terrorists,” said O’Connor. “The next Director must remain committed to the centrality of the Special Agent to the Bureau's mission.” “Although then-Special Agent Rogers left the FBI in 1995 to start his political career, he has never forgotten the men and women of the Bureau and was a champion for Agents during his Congressional career, said O’Connor. Chairman Rogers (R-MI) served in the House of Representatives from 2001 to 2104 and as Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee from 2011 to 2014. A 1985 graduate of Adrian College, he was a commissioned officer in the U.S. Army through the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps at the University of Michigan, and then served as a FBI Special Agent before being elected to the Michigan Senate in 1995. The FBIAA is a professional association with a membership of more than 13,000 active and retired agents nationwide. The FBIAA was founded over three decades ago in response to the growing recognition that agents needed to join together in order to protect and advance the interests of agents both within the Bureau, as well as in the public domain. The FBIAA works diligently to promote and facilitate the intelligent, skillful, and efficient discharge of the professional duties of all FBI agents. The Association works hard to advance and safeguard the careers, economic interests, conditions of employment, and welfare of active and retired FBI agents. For additional information, visit the FBIAA website at www.fbiaa.org. Follow FBIAA on Twitter @FBIAgentsAssoc.


News Article | May 14, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

U.S. President Donald Trump delivers keynote address at Liberty University's commencement in Lynchburg, Virginia, U.S., May 13, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. lawmakers on Sunday called on President Donald Trump to turn over any tapes of conversations with fired FBI chief James Comey, potentially setting up a showdown with the White House as Democrats considered a boycott of the vote on Comey's replacement. In a highly unusual move, Trump last week appeared to suggest on Twitter that he might have tapes of conversations with Comey and warned the former director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation against talking to the media. Trump and a White House spokesman declined to confirm or deny whether such tapes exist. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said the White House must "clear the air" about whether there are any taped conversations. "You can't be cute about tapes. If there are any tapes of this conversation, they need to be turned over," Graham told NBC's "Meet the Press" program. Trump sparked a political firestorm when he abruptly fired Comey last week. The FBI has been investigating alleged Russian meddling in the U.S. election and possible ties between Moscow and the Trump campaign. Democrats have accused Trump of attempting to thwart the FBI's probe and have called for some type of independent inquiry into the matter. Trump has said he removed Comey because he was not doing a good job and that Comey had lost the support of FBI employees. Trump tweeted on Friday that "James Comey better hope that there are no 'tapes' of our conversations before he starts leaking to the press!" If there are recordings, Republican Senator Mike Lee of Utah told the "Fox News Sunday" program it was "inevitable" that they would be subpoenaed and the White House would have to release them. Lee, who was on Trump's list of potential replacements for Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, also said recording conversations in the White House is "not necessarily the best idea." Trump's threat about tapes has intensified calls from Democrats for an independent probe of alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. election. Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer said Trump must immediately provide Congress with any tapes and warned that destroying existing tapes would violate the law. Schumer also said Senate Democrats are weighing whether to refuse to vote on a new FBI director until a special prosecutor is named to investigate Trump's potential ties to Russia. Russia has denied the claims and the White House says there was no collusion. "To have that special prosecutor, people would breathe a sigh of relief because then there would be a real independent person overlooking the FBI director," Schumer told CNN's "State of the Union" program. Trump, who has sought better relations with Russia, has continued to question whether it was behind the hacking of email accounts belonging to Democrats involved in Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign. But Secretary of State Rex Tillerson told NBC's "Meet the Press" program there is no question that "the Russians were playing around in our electoral processes." He defended Trump's decision to meet with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in the Oval Office last week. "It's in the interest of the American people, it's in the interest of Russia and the rest of the world that we do something to see if we cannot improve the relationship between the two greatest nuclear powers in the world," Tillerson said. The Justice Department began interviewing candidates for the FBI director job on Saturday. Some people under consideration include acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe, Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas, New York Appeals Court Judge Michael Garcia and former Assistant Attorney General Alice Fisher, according to a White House official. Meanwhile, a NBC/Wall Street Journal poll released on Sunday found that 29 percent of Americans approve of Trump's decision to fire Comey, while 38 percent disapprove. If a Senate vote on a new FBI director breaks down along party lines, Democrats would not have the votes to block a nominee because Republicans hold a majority in the chamber. "The key is getting some of our Republican colleagues to join us," Schumer said. Republican leaders in the Senate have rebuffed calls for a special prosecutor, saying it would interfere with ongoing congressional probes. Graham said there may come a time when a special prosecutor is needed but not now. "Right now, it is a counterintelligence investigation, not a criminal investigation. So you don't need a special prosecutor," Graham said on "Meet the Press."


Patent
The United States Of America As Represented By The Federal Bureau Of Investigation and Federal Bureau Of Investigation | Date: 2014-02-28

The present invention relates to a hot-wire detonator emulator that has the capability of monitoring switching in a simulated, mock, or inert improvised explosive device (IED) powered by direct current. One purpose of the inventive emulator is to function as an energetic witness substitute by replacing the detonator in an actual IED, thus enabling bomb technicians to conduct bench top and field analyses of IEDs, and to assess the effectiveness of render-safe procedures by, for example, illustrating how a detonator would react in a render-safe procedure.


Patent
Federal Bureau Of Investigation | Date: 2015-06-03

A real-time quantitative PCR assay that utilizes a duplex, synthetic DNA standard to ensure optimal quality assurance and quality control. One embodiment of the invention facilitates amplification of mtDNA by focusing on a 105-base pair target sequence that is minimally homologous to non-human mtDNA. The present invention can also be used to identify the presence of PCR inhibitors and thus indicate the need for sample repurification.

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