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Royo-Bordonada M.A.,Institute Salud Carlos III | Armario P.,Sociedad Espanola de Hipertension Liga Espanola de la Lucha Contra la HTA | Lobos Bejarano J.M.,Sociedad Espanola de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria | Pedro-Botet J.,Sociedad Espanola de Arteriosclerosis | And 16 more authors.
Clinica e Investigacion en Arteriosclerosis | Year: 2016

The VI European Guidelines for Cardiovascular Prevention recommend combining population and high-risk strategies with lifestyle changes as a cornerstone of prevention, and propose the SCORE function to quantify cardiovascular risk. The guidelines highlight disease specific interventions, and conditions as women, young people and ethnic minorities. Screening for subclinical atherosclerosis with noninvasive imaging techniques is not recommended. The guidelines distinguish four risk levels (very high, high, moderate and low) with therapeutic objectives for lipid control according to risk. Diabetes mellitus confers a high risk, except for subjects with type 2 diabetes with less than <10 years of evolution, without other risk factors or complications, or type 1 diabetes of short evolution without complications. The decision to start pharmacological treatment of arterial hypertension will depend on the blood pressure level and the cardiovascular risk, taking into account the lesion of target organs. The guidelines don't recommend antiplatelet drugs in primary prevention because of the increased bleeding risk. The low adherence to the medication requires simplified therapeutic regimes and to identify and combat its causes. The guidelines highlight the responsibility of health professionals to take an active role in advocating evidence-based interventions at the population level, and propose effective interventions, at individual and population level, to promote a healthy diet, the practice of physical activity, the cessation of smoking and the protection against alcohol abuse. © 2016.


Royo Bordonada M.A.,Institute Salud Carlos III | Armario P.,Sociedad Espanola de Hipertension Liga Espanola de la Lucha contra la HTA | Lobos Bejarano J.M.,Sociedad Espanola de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria | Pedro Botet J.,Sociedad Espanola de Arteriosclerosis | And 16 more authors.
Pediatria de Atencion Primaria | Year: 2017

The VI European Guidelines for Cardiovascular Prevention recommend combining population and high-risk strategies with lifestyle changes as a cornerstone of prevention, and propose the SCORE function to quantify cardiovascular risk. The guidelines highlight disease specific interventions, and conditions specific to women, young people and ethnic minorities. Screening for subclinical atherosclerosis with noninvasive imaging techniques is not recommended. The guidelines distinguish four risk levels (very high, high, moderate and low) with therapeutic objectives for lipid control according to risk. Diabetes mellitus confers a high risk, except for subjects with type 2 diabetes with less than ten years of evolution, with no other risk factors or complications, or type 1 diabetes of short evolution without complications. The decision to start pharmacological treatment of arterial hypertension will depend on the blood pressure level and cardiovascular risk, taking into account the lesion of target organs. The guidelines do not recommend antiplatelet drugs in primary prevention because of the increased risk of bleeding. The low adherence to the medication requires simplified therapeutic regimes and identifying and combating its causes. The guidelines highlight the responsibility of health professionals to play an active role in promoting evidence-based interventions at the population level, and propose effective interventions, both at individual and population level, to promote a healthy diet, the practice of physical activity, the cessation of smoking and the protection against alcohol abuse. © 2017, Spanish Association of Primary Care Pediatrics. All rights reserved.


Royo-Bordonada M.A.,Institute Salud Carlos III | Bejarano J.M.L.,Sociedad Espanola de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria | Alvarez F.V.,Sociedad Espanola de Arteriosclerosis | Sans S.,Sociedad Espanola de Salud Publica y Administracion Sanitaria | And 16 more authors.
Revista Espanola de Salud Publica | Year: 2013

Based on the two main frameworks for evaluating scientific evidence SEC and GRADE European cardiovascular prevention guidelines recommend interventions across all life stages using a combination of populationbased and high-risk strategies with diet as the cornerstone of prevention. The evaluation of cardiovascular risk (CVR) incorporates HDL levels and psychosocial factors, a very high risk category, and the concept of age-risk. They also recommend cognitive-behavioural methods (e.g., motivational interviewing, psychological interventions, led by health professionals and with the participation of the patient's family, to counterbalance psychosocial stress and reduce CVR through the institution of positive habits such as a healthy diet, physical activity, smoking cessation, and adherence to treatment. Additionally, public health interventions-such as smoking ban in public areas or the elimination of trans fatty acids from the food chain are also essential. Other innovations include abandoning antiplatelet therapy in primary prevention and the recommendation of maintaining blood pressure (BP) within the 130-139/80-85 mmHg range in diabetic patients and individuals with high CVR. Finally, due to the significant impact on patient progress and medical costs, special emphasis is given to the low therapeutic adherence levels observed. In sum, improving cardiovascular prevention requires a true partnership among the political class, public administrations, scientific and professional associations, health foundations, consumer associations, patients and their families. Such partnership would promote population-based and individual strategies by taking advantage of the broad spectrum of scientific evidence available, from clinical trials to observational studies and mathematical models to evaluate population-based interventions, including cost-effectiveness analyses.


Royo-Bordonada M.A.,Institute Salud Carlos III | Lobos Bejarano J.M.,Sociedad Espanola de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria | Villar Alvarez F.,Sociedad Espanola de Arteriosclerosis | Sans S.,Sociedad Espanola de Salud Publica y Administracion Sanitaria | And 17 more authors.
Hipertension y Riesgo Vascular | Year: 2013

Based on the two main frameworks for evaluating scientific evidence (SEC and GRADE) European cardiovascular prevention guidelines recommend interventions across all life stages using a combination of population-based and high-risk strategies with diet as the cornerstone of prevention. The evaluation of cardiovascular risk (CVR) incorporates HDL levels and psychosocial factors, a very high risk category, and the concept of age-risk. They also recommend cognitive-behavioural methods (e.g., motivational interviewing, psychological interventions) led by health professionals and with the participation of the patient's family, to counterbalance psychosocial stress and reduce CVR through the institution of positive habits such as a healthy diet, physical activity, smoking cessation, and adherence to treatment. Additionally, public health interventions - such as smoking ban in public areas or the elimination of trans fatty acids from the food chain - are also essential. Other innovations include abandoning antiplatelet therapy in primary prevention and the recommendation of maintaining blood pressure within the 130-139/80-85. mmHg range in diabetic patients and individuals with high CVR. Finally, due to the significant impact on patient progress and medical costs, special emphasis is given to the low therapeutic adherence levels observed. In sum, improving cardiovascular prevention requires a true partnership among the political class, public administrations, scientific and professional associations, health foundations, consumer associations, patients and their families. Such partnership would promote population-based and individual strategies by taking advantage of the broad spectrum of scientific evidence available, from clinical trials to observational studies and mathematical models to evaluate population-based interventions, including cost-effectiveness analyses. © 2013 SEHLELHA.


Royo-Bordonada M.A.,Institute Salud Carlos III | Lobos J.M.,Sociedad Espanola de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria | Brotons C.,Sociedad Espanola de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria | Villar F.,Sociedad Espanola de Arteriosclerosis | And 7 more authors.
Medicina Clinica | Year: 2014

Background and objective: In Spain, where cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death, control of their risk factors is low. This study analyzes the implementation of cardiovascular risk (CVR) assessment in clinical practice and the existence of control objectives amongst quality care indicators and professional incentive systems. Method: Between 2010 and 2011, data from each autonomous community were collected, by means of a specific questionnaire concerning prevalence and control of major CVR factors, CVR assessment, and implementation of control objectives amongst quality care indicators and primary care incentive systems. Results: Fifteen out of 17 autonomous communities filled in the questionnaire. CVR was calculated through SCORE in 9 autonomous communities, REGICOR in 3 and Framingham in 3, covering 3.4 to 77.6% of target population. The resulting control of the main CVR factors was low and variable: hypertension (22.7-61.3%), dyslipidemia (11-45.1%), diabetes (18.5-84%) and smoking (20-50.5%). Most autonomous communities did not consider CVR assessment and control amongst quality care indicators or incentive systems, highlighting the lack of initiatives on lifestyles. Conclusions: Variability exists in cardiovascular prevention policies among autonomous communities. It is necessary to implement a common agreed cardiovascular prevention guide, to encourage physicians to implement CVR in electronic clinical history, and to promote CVR assessment and control inclusion amongst quality care indicators and professional incentive systems, focusing on lifestyles management. © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Sociedad Espanola de Epidemiologia., Federacion de Asociaciones de Enfermeria Comunitaria y Atencion Primaria., Sociedad Espanola de Arteriosclerosis., Ministerio de Sanidad and 12 more.
Type: | Journal: Hipertension y riesgo vascular | Year: 2016

The VI European Guidelines for Cardiovascular Prevention recommend combining population and high-risk strategies with lifestyle changes as a cornerstone of prevention, and propose the SCORE function to quantify cardiovascular risk. The guidelines highlight disease specific interventions, and conditions as women, young people and ethnic minorities. Screening for subclinical atherosclerosis with noninvasive imaging techniques is not recommended. The guidelines distinguish four risk levels (very high, high, moderate and low) with therapeutic objectives for lipid control according to risk. Diabetes mellitus confers a high risk, except for subjects with type 2 diabetes with less than <10 years of evolution, without other risk factors or complications, or type 1 diabetes of short evolution without complications. The decision to start pharmacological treatment of arterial hypertension will depend on the blood pressure level and the cardiovascular risk, taking into account the lesion of target organs. The guidelines dont recommend antiplatelet drugs in primary prevention because of the increased bleeding risk. The low adherence to the medication requires simplified therapeutic regimes and to identify and combat its causes. The guidelines highlight the responsibility of health professionals to take an active role in advocating evidence-based interventions at the population level, and propose effective interventions, at individual and population level, to promote a healthy diet, the practice of physical activity, the cessation of smoking and the protection against alcohol abuse.


PubMed | Sociedad Espanola de Epidemiologia., Federacion de Asociaciones de Enfermeria Comunitaria y Atencion Primaria., Sociedad Espanola de Arteriosclerosis., Ministerio de Sanidad and 12 more.
Type: | Journal: Revista espanola de salud publica | Year: 2016

The VI European Guidelines for Cardiovascular Prevention recommend combining population and high-risk strategies with lifestyle changes as a cornerstone of prevention, and propose the SCORE function to quantify cardiovascular risk. The guidelines highlight disease specific interventions, and conditions as women, young people and ethnic minorities. Screening for subclinical atherosclerosis with noninvasive imaging techniques is not recommended. The guidelines distinguish four risk levels (very high, high, moderate and low) with therapeutic objectives for lipid control according to risk. Diabetes mellitus confers a high risk, except for subjects with type 2 diabetes with less than 10 years of evolution, without other risk factors or complications, or type 1 diabetes of short evolution without complications. The decision to start pharmacological treatment of arterial hypertension will depend on the blood pressure level and the cardiovascular risk, taking into account the lesion of target organs. The guidelines dont recommend antiplatelet drugs in primary prevention because of the increased bleeding risk. The low adherence to the medication requires simplified therapeutic regimes and to identify and combat its causes. The guidelines highlight the responsibility of health professionals to take an active role in advocating evidence-based interventions at the population level, and propose effective interventions, at individual and population level, to promote a healthy diet, the practice of physical activity, the cessation of smoking and the protection against alcohol abuse.


PubMed | Federacion de Asociaciones de Enfermeria Comunitaria y Atencion Primaria, Sociedad Espanola de Cardiologia, Institute Salud Carlos III, Sociedad Espanola de Hipertension Liga Espanola de la Lucha Contra la Hipertension Arterial and 6 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Medicina clinica | Year: 2013

In Spain, where cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death, control of their risk factors is low. This study analyzes the implementation of cardiovascular risk (CVR) assessment in clinical practice and the existence of control objectives amongst quality care indicators and professional incentive systems.Between 2010 and 2011, data from each autonomous community were collected, by means of a specific questionnaire concerning prevalence and control of major CVR factors, CVR assessment, and implementation of control objectives amongst quality care indicators and primary care incentive systems.Fifteen out of 17 autonomous communities filled in the questionnaire. CVR was calculated through SCORE in 9 autonomous communities, REGICOR in 3 and Framingham in 3, covering 3.4 to 77.6% of target population. The resulting control of the main CVR factors was low and variable: hypertension (22.7-61.3%), dyslipidemia (11-45.1%), diabetes (18.5-84%) and smoking (20-50.5%). Most autonomous communities did not consider CVR assessment and control amongst quality care indicators or incentive systems, highlighting the lack of initiatives on lifestyles.Variability exists in cardiovascular prevention policies among autonomous communities. It is necessary to implement a common agreed cardiovascular prevention guide, to encourage physicians to implement CVR in electronic clinical history, and to promote CVR assessment and control inclusion amongst quality care indicators and professional incentive systems, focusing on lifestyles management.

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